@yogthos
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What it ultimately comes down to is that truly secure systems cannot be based on trust. The article does a good job outlining all the ways the users have to trust Whisper Systems without any ability to do independent external verification regarding what the server is doing with the data available to it.

Even if we assumed that Signal works as advertised the fact that it’s tied to your phone number is incredibly dangerous. Obviously if this information was shared with the government it will disclose your identity as the article notes. This information can then be trivially correlated with all the other information the government has on you and your social network. Given that Signal is advertised as a tool for activists, that means it creates a way to do mass tracking of activists.

Being centralized is another huge problem given that the service could simply be shut down at any time on government order. If you’re at a protest and rely on Signal it could just stop working.

edit: as people have pointed out, it turns out you can use third party clients

Finally, since the client is a binary distributed by Whisper, it’s not possible to verify that the client and server use the published protocol independently. Since alternative clients aren’t allowed to connect to the server, we can’t test the protocol and have to rely on trust.

poVoq
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I don’t think you can have messaging without some level of trust, but I agree that the Signal Foundation isn’t very trustworthy.

As for the communication protocol… there are some 3rd party clients that connect to the Signal servers (Axelotl, signald etc.) which have not been banned from connecting for quite some time now. Not sure why, but at least that shows that the protocol in general works as intended. Together with reproducible builds for the official client this at least makes it likely that the unmodified official client works as advertised (although there could still be some caveats in the shared libraries).

But who knows what the server does and supply chain attacks that substitute the official client for a modified one are still easily possible when Signal controls all distribution channels (they will tell you this is to prevent supply chain attacks, but only those of most 3rd parties, not those originating from within Signal & Google/Apple).

@yogthos
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I mean trust specifically in the context of the technology. Things need to be independently verifiable. And thanks for correction regarding the clients, I was under the impression that you could only use the official app with their server. If you can use an open source client that addresses my concern regarding verification.

At the very least we can know that the protocol works as advertised. Since it’s E2E, I think it’s probably reasonable to assume that at least the messages themselves are secure.

@null_radix
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Finally, since the client is a binary distributed by Whisper, it’s not possible to verify that the client and server use the published protocol independently

you can use Signal-Foss and use their builds or build it yourself.

@yogthos
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That does address that concern.

@Eli
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@dreeg_ocedam
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@yogthos
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Yeah, others corrected me. My understanding was that you had to use the client from the app store to talk to the official server.

@KLISHDFSDF
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This is FUD that some people keep on spreading. You can build your own client https://signal.org/blog/reproducible-android/

There’s even these 3rd party clients that have existed for some time now and haven’t been blocked:

@k_o_t
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4h ago

40+ comments

uh oh

edit: seriously tho, 👌 writeup

Dessalines
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Haha thanks. Its impossible for it not to be controversial, for some reason I’ve found signal fans to be more fanatical in their loyalty to it than most advocates of other privacy apps.

@dreeg_ocedam
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Dessalines
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Frankly, these are the exact same defenses you hear of companies like apple, who also run centralized services, yet their userbases are utterly convinced of their privacy.

You can’t just say things like “the evidence against them is circurmstancial”, for centralized services. It all boils down to “gut feelings”, rather than the reproducibility requirements that the self hosted solutions must pass. Don’t trust these companies by default, and never take a pretty ui or branding polish as a stand in for trust.

Phone number ids, and centralized, us based services wouldn’t be acceptable for any privacy oriented chat app. Signal also shouldn’t get a pass.

@Helix@feddit.de
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uh oh

It’s a good article :) hope you don’t have to delete comments, but by the looks of it, they’re very civil.

@k_o_t
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yeah, i didn’t mean that anything bad is going on, just that it’s a somewhat controversial topic and heated debate is taking place hehe

@tinyhole
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I’ve got to be honest with you. I went into this hesitant but you make some convincing arguments.

While for activism I agree with your recommendations. More generally it’s mostly a social network and thus UX thing. I recently moved from whatsapp to signal because my social network was willing to do so and the UX was similar to whatsapp.

It believe element and thus matrix is almost ready to do the same.

The future of the internet is federated and p2p or none at all.

Dessalines
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👏

@Helix@feddit.de
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Signal’s use luckily never caught on by the general public of China ( or the Hong Kong Administrative region ), whose government prefers autonomy, rather than letting US tech control its communication platforms

Pretty useless tangent. Even for the US of A, Signal isn’t the best communications platform. And China has its own problems with WeChat/QQ, which is basically run by the state. At least they don’t export it like the US does…

poVoq
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Why no mentioning of XMPP (other then Jitsi, which sort of is XMPP)? It is at least as good if not better then Matrix.

@tomtom
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the decentralized nature of XMPP is a huge plus for me.

I guess Matrix also has that, in theory, but from what I have seen the matrix.org homeserver still effectively functions as a central point to track metadata.

I guess the issue with XMPP is that people can send unencrypted messages to you, perhaps with deanonymizing information?

Dessalines
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Mainly preference, I don’t prefer it because it isn’t encrypted by default.

I could add a section on XMPP I spose.

poVoq
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Neither is Matrix if you use some 3rd party clients. With the most popular XMPP clients e2ee is enabled by default.

Dessalines
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Sorry for the length, I’m writing this for a wider, non-tech audience, so I had to go into a describe a lot of terms.

@Helix@feddit.de
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ever heard of footnotes? :D

Appreciate the write-up. Linked it on my sparse wiki page about Signal.

@Sammo
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Thanks for the nice article!

Dessalines
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No probs!

@Sammo
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Also a few interesting things: I saw a lot of people saying that Signal isn’t keeping metadata, and a few articles from4 years ago claiming that. I took a look at the signal ToS and Privacy Policy which states quite the opposite: „SIGNAL DOES NOT WARRANT […] THAT OUR SERVICES WILL BE […] SECURE, OR SAFE”, „For the purpose of operating our Services, you agree to our data practices as described in our Privacy Policy, as well as the transfer of your encrypted information and metadata to the United States and other countries where we have or use facilities, service providers or partners.“ and „Other instances where Signal may need to share your data

To meet any applicable law, regulation, legal process or enforceable governmental request.“

@KLISHDFSDF
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Lets look at how they’ve behaved when forced to comply with the law - https://signal.org/bigbrother/central-california-grand-jury/

You’ll see that the only info they can provide is:

  • The day you signed up
  • The last day one of your clients pinged their servers (this is needed to purge abandoned clients)

So what their ToS means is pretty much that they will operate within the realm of reality. Who out there IS providing a warranty of security/safety? And if they fail to ensure your safety/security, how do you go about “redeeming” your warranty? I think you’re reading too much into it.

@dreeg_ocedam
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@roastpotatothief
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matrix, jitsi, etc, are very different types if platform from signal. if you just want signal but without all the problems, it’s Wire.

but if you want my opinion - the only thing that matters is bridging. none of these small networks can succeed unless they can bridge to the others and to email. bridging is subverting the network effect to combine the small players and help them destroy the big players.

@Echedenyan
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Are you really recommending Wire after years of not taking care of their users?

I stopped making reports and using it 2 years ago when they changed parent company, upgraded their ToS to notify they could cancel or ban the service for countries which don’t generate profit for them or under law and because they started ignoring bug reports sending by email an automatic reply that they “were dedicated to the enterprise edition and delaying the personal edition support”.

@roastpotatothief
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I didn’t know about any of that. TBH this subject comes up a lot on lemmy and you’re the first to mention those things.

I’ve not noticed any bugginess or lack-of-support type problems.

TBH those complaints don’t even sound that bad! compared against the problems the other messaging apps (inc signal) have.

@je_vv
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I see Jami missing, though Briar is mentioned. Any particular reason for missing Jami? Perhaps because it doesn’t use the double ratchet popularized by Signal? It does e3ee by default, and supports voice and video calls besides chats…

Halce
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The same way you could (and in my opinion should) be wary of Briar too, not yet, perhaps, for technical reasons at least, but in regards to the sources of their funding (see the bottom section of https://briarproject.org/about-us) - OTF

Dessalines
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That is definitely sus, and makes me scrutinize briar a little bit more. Its probably okay for now, because unlike signal, its decentralized, and the f droid builds are from source.

@Echedenyan
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distributed*

@TheAnonymouseJoker
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IngrownMink4
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And what do you think of Molly? Do you recommend it to replace Signal or is it preferable not to use Signal or any of its forks?

Dessalines
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Federated / P2P is a must IMO for any messaging service, so that rules out any signal or fork, even if its self hostable, which I assume molly is.

IngrownMink4
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Okay, I will keep that in mind. I thought Molly was the ideal alternative to replace Signal. I will try to use more Element or Briar.

poVoq
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No fixed account and really easy multi-server connection clients like with IRC kinda works also.

@KLISHDFSDF
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A quick rebuttal of some points you made. Not going too in depth as I just want to provide my perspective:

  • CIA Funding:
    • This is a non-issue. The OTF also funds: Briar, Tor, Wireguard, Delta Chat, Bind9, CGIProxy, CertBot, K-9 Mail, Tails, NoScript, QubesOS, The Guardian Project, and a host of other essential privacy tools/software. You’re telling me they’re all compromised just because they’re getting funded? I don’t buy it.
  • A Single, Centralized, US-based service
    • The Code is open source and Android has reproducible builds, iOS would have them too, but it’s impossible based on the way Apple’s build process works. Lastly, Signal’s devs/infra exist in the US, they have to exist somewhere, why not the country of origin? With the code being open/reproducible, you don’t have to trust them.
  • Phone # Identifiers
    • This is to make onboarding easier and minimize spam - I got my grandma to install it and find the rest of the family on Signal VERY easily. Trying to get her onboard with Matrix/Element or even Briar would have been a struggle. I like Briar, but its not ready for mainstream yet. I also like Element, but I don’t believe it’s quite a text/sms replacement like Signal is - in addition to leaking metadata.
  • Social network graphs
    • Here you mention metadata, so I’ll ask which other provider goes to the lengths that Signal does to minimize the collection of metadata? And please read over how Sealed sender works before you claim its easy to circumvent. You deride their implementation and claim how easy this is to collect without understanding what’s going on under the hood.
  • Abandonment of Open source
    • This is a stretch. Signal is a non-profit. They don’t have the same funding or staffing as their competitors and all their code is current. Yeah, they let it get out of sync for a while, they’re human, not robots. Don’t let perfect be the enemy of good.
  • Bundling a Cryptocurrency
    • What does a messaging platform have to do with crypto/payments? I don’t know, you should ask every other big player who is also trying to get in on the game hoping to siphon even more data from everyone’s purchases.

I do want to close by saying that Signal is definitely not the end-all-be-all of secure messaging platforms, but it is currently the best for mass adoption. I’m keeping my eyes on Matrix, Sessions, and Briar, but can’t say they’re ready to “go mainstream” yet.

@Helix@feddit.de
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The Code is open source

the server code being not federated means you effectively can’t (or won’t) self host.

Phone # Identifiers – This is to make onboarding easier and minimize spam

Yeah but you could do that as verification and an additional means to find users, not the primary user ID. Threema has generated IDs, Matrix has usernames, Telegram has usernames. Why can’t Signal?

Yeah, they let it get out of sync for a while

Why, though?

What does a messaging platform have to do with crypto/payments?

Good question. Signal obviously didn’t ask about it and wants to become another WeChat/QQ clone where you can pay with your messaging application and circumvent taxes.

Signal is definitely not the end-all-be-all of secure messaging platforms, but it is currently the best for mass adoption.

I’d agree if you’d add “one of” between “currently” and “the”.

Dessalines
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Also, its not that signal just got lazy with letting their code get out of sync. They chose not to publish updates for their server for a whole year, until the open source community got really angry, and then they finally relented. If I or any open source maintainer did that, we’d rightly be abandoned. Some here are giving signal a pass for it tho.

@KLISHDFSDF
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I think the difference is it’s not a federated platform so not many people really care about access to the server-side code. If I was hosting a lemmy instance I would obviously be frustrated if you withheld from all other instance admins as you’d be putting us at a disadvantage. Signal doesn’t allow federation so the consequences aren’t the same.

and then they finally relented

You’re embellishing the story for added emotional value. What if instead you wrote, “users were angry, the Signal devs were busy, but eventually got around to publishing the latest code”. You weren’t there so you can’t say that they didn’t want to - or had the time to - publish the server code. You’re implying malice when it doesn’t have to be. Why? Maybe it was on their backlog and it was a task that nobody ever got around to? I dunno, I’ve been in situations like that before and it just sucks to hear people implying the Signal devs are doing shady things when it may simply be that they’re human and not perfect. I’ve had times where our dev team was accused of being “lax” when we’re all running at 110% but just can’t get to that one thing that a small handful of people really want and are very vocal about.

Dessalines
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I can tell you, publishing source code is as easy as typing git push. That they needed to “clean things up” at all in an ostensibly open source codebase is sus.

@KLISHDFSDF
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I’m going to disagree again.

I know how easy it is to type “git push”. I’ve worked where we had 200+ things that were that “simple” but just weren’t prioritized because of our small team. Also had to do thorough code reviews before we synced to our public repo. There’s a hundred non-malicious reasons they delayed - including that they didn’t yet want to make the monero stuff public yet. It’s not uncommon to keep things from the public until they’re ready, in case you decide to scrap the project and remove it last minute before you sync to your public repo and have people question something that is no longer valid/important. I guess I try to look at it from a more human perspective than immediately trying to tarnish people’s intentions.

Dessalines
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That simply means that development isn’t out in the open. Why would you not push branches and do code reviews out in the open for an ostensibly open source project?

@KLISHDFSDF
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That simply means that development isn’t out in the open

Correct. FOSS doesn’t mean they have to develop it out in the open, only that they have to release the code for everyone else’s benefit.

Why would you not push branches and do code reviews out in the open for an ostensibly open source project

Because open source simply means the code is available. You’re not forced to interact with anyone else just because something is open source.

@KLISHDFSDF
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the server code being not federated means you effectively can’t (or won’t) self host.

Agreed. I hope they change their minds on this, although I’m not holding my breath.

Yeah but you could do that as verification and an additional means to find users, not the primary user ID. Threema has generated IDs, Matrix has usernames, Telegram has usernames. Why can’t Signal?

Agree. The devs have stated that this is coming this year. We’ll see if they can roll it out before the year ends.

Yeah, they let it get out of sync for a while

Why, though?

Honestly, don’t know and don’t care. I suspect because they didn’t want to yet make public their crypto stuff, but I’m not going to assume malice here without evidence.

Good question. Signal obviously didn’t ask about it and wants to become another WeChat/QQ clone where you can pay with your messaging application and circumvent taxes.

Whatsapp also lets you pay - although I believe its only in India. Telegram also attempted to include crypto. Why wouldn’t we want a private way to pay instead of letting Facebook/Google/etc, take over? I fully support them making sending money easier and more private.

I’d agree if you’d add “one of” between “currently” and “the”.

I’ll agree that it’s “one of” the best. Which one would you throw in your top 3?

@Helix@feddit.de
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I’ll agree that it’s “one of” the best. Which one would you throw in your top 3?

Matrix or XMPP. I made a messenger comparison matrix (in German) and they get the most green check marks for my criteria.

@dreeg_ocedam
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@dreeg_ocedam
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@null_radix
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Bind9

Damnit! guys and gals, the CIA is hinding in bind9

@dreeg_ocedam
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Dessalines
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Since when does Zuckerberg endorses Signal?

He uses signal, I don’t think he’s publicly endorsed it. Read over that sentence again.

The best way to do private/secure messenging is to do it similarly to the least private and secure messaging protocol in use?

I’m just describing how it works, this seems overly combative. Encryption is a different topic than federation. Emails and phone calls are federated, yet insecure.

This entire section completely ignores that Signal isn’t designed to talk to random people. It’s designed to talk to your friends/family/coworkers, who most likely already have your phone number. It makes it super easy to migrate. There’s no way my grandma would be able to add me on briar…

That “ease of migration” comes at a cost: namely that signal’s centralized server now knows your identity. And yes while briar isn’t quite user friendly yet, its just as easy to share a user_id string as it is a phone number. With matrix or XMPP I can share my ID with a link.

sealed sender

I don’t know enough about this to comment, but signal still has to know who to send the message to. That means that the server must decrypt the recipient at some point.

Payment in Signal has been a major request since the migration from WhatsApp. In multiple countries WhatsApp has a payment feature that is hugely popular.

I’d argue that most people don’t want a cryptocurrency bundled in their chat apps. This is a really strange thing to defend.

For the last one, its telling that you deleted half my sentence. The full sentence is this:

Signal’s use luckily never caught on by the general public of China ( or the Hong Kong Administrative region ), whose government prefers autonomy, rather than letting US tech control its communication platforms, as most of the rest of the world naively allows.

Many countries have now realized their mistake in letting US tech companies control their social media platforms, and are trying to adopt the PRC model of home-grown chat apps. A great example is India, where Facebook and Youtube ( 2 US tech companies ), are the most popular social media apps. This was a glaring mistake allowing these US surveillance giants to so completely own the social media landscape of India.

@KLISHDFSDF
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I don’t know enough about this to comment, but signal still has to know who to send the message to. That means that the server must decrypt the recipient at some point.

Then you shouldn’t be spreading FUD about it.

@dreeg_ocedam
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Dessalines
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If you live in France, why would you want a US company to own and control your communications? That was the main thrust of the article, which you never addressed.

@dreeg_ocedam
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Dessalines
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The App is FLOSS,

As I noted in my article, remember when signal went a whole year without publishing their server source code updates?

Non of your points are really any concrete proof of Signal being backdoored.

I also addressed this, in the NSL section. It is illegal for signal to tell you that, otherwise they all face heavy prison time. Your default position then is to “trust” US services… not a good idea from a privacy standpoint given the history of surveillance disclosures.

@chiefstorm
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I appreciate and admire your motivation @dessalines@lemmy.ml

However, Signal is like the one application that’s user friendly and is NOT compromised, and you seem to be completely attacking it.

I have reason to believe that Signal is NOT compromised. and the code is indeed Open Source and can be trusted.

I don’t trust the US, but I do trust Moxie Marlinspike to be a privacy advocate, he has spent his entire career being an advocate for privacy.

although Signal went a whole year without publishing server source code because they were being subtle about introducing mobilecoin crypto-asset support, and they didn’t want people to jump hog wild into mobilecoin. However, they now have released the server source code, therefore I do not think this is a valid argument.

Dessalines
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How do you feel about marlinspikes ruthlessly banning all third party clients and server implementations? Or his choice of phone # identifiers?

@chiefstorm
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I appreciate your critique and well written essay, as well as your motivation. Thank you again for writing this, and I will heed your advice and be more skeptical of signal foundation. However, but I have followed Marlinspike for years, and was an early signal adopter, so I do have some trust that the project is not compromised.

comment from lobster also makes some good points here, and I tend to agree with this guy

This take comes up every so often, e.g. in some of the linked articles. I’m sympathetic to many of the concerns raised, but I’ve yet to see serious engagement with some of the deeper issues raised. For example: A significant number of security and privacy-enhancing technologies (PET) have received US military funding or other support. See: Tor from the Naval Research Lab, OpenBSD from DARPA. SELinux comes from the NSA. The Open Technology Fund has also support Ricochet, WireGuard, ? Delta.chat, and Briar (that the author recommends), etc. (link). Are all these tools suspect? As an aside, the EU also funds a significant number of PETs. While not as egregious as the US, the EU is no enemy of mass surveillance, either. One reason for Signal’s centralization is, in short, that it’s hard to update federated protocols, including their security features. E2E encryption in XMPP or email is still a pain, and far from usable for most people. I hope that e.g. Matrix can pull it off, but they face challenges that centralized services don’t. With a centralized service, you know that you can handle unforeseen security developments quickly. Shouldn’t this be a key priority for a security tool? Using phone numbers as identifiers has its benefits: you don’t need to store users’ contacts on your servers. A service like Wire, that does allow you to sign up without a phone number, has to store your full social graph on their end. Avoiding this sort of metadata is a hard problem — Signal has opted for minimizing the amount they store. It’s hard to overstate how much ease of use matters when it comes to gaining mass adoption for these tools. For a long time, privacy & security tools were super user-unfriendly, reserved only for a small technical elite (see PGP). If we want to combat mass surveillance, we need tools that the masses want to install (in my experience, it’s hard enough to convince activist groups to migrate off Discord or Slack — the alternatives need to be similarly easy to use).

How do you feel about the guy who donated 50 million to Signal? He probably has the most influence on the project second only to Marlinspike.

@KLISHDFSDF
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How do you feel about marlinspikes ruthlessly banning all third party clients

False.

There are a few 3rd party clients. They all identify themselves to the server that they’re 3rd party clients and they haven’t been banned.

Dessalines
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Thanks for linking Libresignal, read over its readme.

But really 3rd party clients are beside the point: the main thrust of the article is about signal being a single, us domiciled, centralized service. They don’t let you self host a server, and you also have no way of verifying their server code. You just have to “trust them”.

@tomtom
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Yes I do not see why we should trust any system which forbids self-hosting, especially when alternatives exist.

@dreeg_ocedam
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Halce
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We have one FLOSS project that is very high quality, secure and gained significant popularity, and we start shooting it down ourselves…

This would be a truly problematic sentiment in some other cases. But the point here, is that unlike Matrix, Signal is not really ours.

@dreeg_ocedam
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Halce
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What I mean is that Signal is more of a code dump rather than a truly free software project, it’s developed mostly internally, in that way Matrix is much more a true community project.

@dreeg_ocedam
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Halce
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Sure. Signal is a better choice than the clown that’s Telegram.

@dreeg_ocedam
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@jazzfes
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So if we don’t know what runs on the server side, how do we know then that this is not used to map user networks, i.e. who communicates with who? From an activist POV wouldn’t that be a significant risk?

Also, even if you trust the company today, given that it is US based, it is subject to the gag orders the US government agencies hand out. So that makes it still a problem, no?

@dreeg_ocedam
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@jazzfes
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Self hosting of the synapse server is pretty well documented. There even is an ansible script to speed it up.

I self hosted early on and it wasn’t particularly time consuming.

Again, the specific issue with Signal is that it is located in the US, which has pretty authoritarian practices against exactly the type of organisation that runs Signal. This potentially makes Signal problematic even if the people running it have the best intentions.

Is this context the use of phone numbers is questionable too, in my opinion at least. The given rational is that it makes it easier for users to sign up, but that’s really not true. Email is used by pretty much everyone and doesn’t rely on phone numbers. I’m sure someone thinking half a day about user IDs that aren’t carrying inherent privacy risk will likely come up with something.

I had my parents using matrix for years without issue in a quite advanced age and they had no issues desite not using phone numbers…

@dreeg_ocedam
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@jazzfes
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Got to ask now: are you working for Signal? It really sounds like it…

Re sysadmin and self hosting it really depends on the scope. You can follow basic security recommendations, which you will set up once, and which will protect you from bots and scripts. What about targeted attacks? Not sure, but if you host for yourself or family and friends only, I wouldn’t take this as my threat model.

I have a Nextcloud server running for about 4 years now with close to zero downtime. During those years I had perhaps two instances where I did larger upgrades which took me perhaps an hour on two weekends to prepare (basically backing stuff up, dealing with the excitement, reading up) and then maybe one evening to execute.

I’m sure hosting for millions of people who might end up sending lawyers your way is difficult. Running something like matrix yourself for friends and family simply isn’t and it removes all the security and privacy risk that comes with trusting an US based organisation that had its share of controversies, and more importantly is subject to the questionable laws and enforcement practices.

Anyone who had installed linux and is happy to work with a console would be capable of learning how to self host in a reasonable amount of time.

poVoq
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Except that they don’t have the message senders thanks to sealed sender

Sealed sender is a nice idea, but due to Signal’s centralized server architecture it is sadly snake-oil. If Signal wants they can easily circumvent sealed sender with a simple timing correlation as they have 100% knowledge about when a client sends or receives a message.

@dreeg_ocedam
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poVoq
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Because that client connects to their server to do so roll eyes

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Of course they know which client connects when to their server and sends messages to them. Seal sender is only about cutting the direct relation between that sending event and the receiver. However they also know exactly when a client receives a message (just not directly from whom). Thus since they know exactly when clients send and receive messages it is trivial to run a timing attack for a few minutes and you know with 99.9% certainty who is talking to whom, even with seal sender.

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If that were the case, the sealed sender stuff would a complete lie, which would seem out of character for Signal.

It seems like your loyalty to signal isn’t based on any facts or history whatsoever. I go over the untrustworthy history of signal’s founders, but you’ve ignored all those points in your replies so far.

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I go over the untrustworthy history of signal’s founders

The OTF also funds the following: Briar, Tor, Wireguard, Delta Chat, Bind9, CGIProxy, CertBot, K-9 Mail, Tails, NoScript, QubesOS, The Guardian Project

You going to say that Briar is a good alternative despite receiving funding from the CIA just like Signal? How about QubesOS or NoScript. Are they also no longer trustworthy because they’re funded by the OTF?

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That honestly does make me question those projects a bit more, and should put some more scrutiny on them. Radio free asia is not looking out for open source, they’re trying to get a jump on coopting projects, because no one else is funding open source.

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Whisper Systems was founded in 2010 according to Wikipedia, while the funding from the open tech fund started in 2013.

Interestingly, Singnal actually introduced its cryptographic protocol to the public only in 2013, when they got the funding (see even Wikipedia for that).

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Of course, I never said it was founded by radio free asia, just that it got its initial funding from them. The only thing thats up for debate there, is their continued involvement.

But based on them defending signal from critics as recently as a few years ago.

2ndly, open source doesn’t mean too much for centralized services that aren’t self hostable, and especially ones that delay their source code updates until the community wonders why there haven’t been any after a full year.

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https://archive.is/Rz6Qa near the bottom.

The forks also aren’t federated, making them dead in the water imo.

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Its not a complete lie, as a similar system on a federated messenger where lots of different legal entities control the different client to server connections would really benefit from it (I hope someone will implement it for XMPP in the future), but due to the centralization of the Signal servers it is snake-oil as explained above.

I am not sure what you mean with “authenticate” in this context, but of course the signal servers receive TCP connection from a specific IP address at a specific point in time. If they also look at that TCP connection and authenticate the sender is mostly irrelevant, but I would guess they also do that to prevent network spam / flooding attacks.

Edit: I think a lot of the things Signal does are good so long as you trust them and assume not a single one of their employees (or one of those their servers run on, AFAIK previously Google and now AWS) is compromised by the NSA/FBI. I find that highly unlikely and thus have to assume Signal’s servers are run by a hostile actor and according to that such timing attacks are likely to happen.

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If you use additional measures to protect yourself it becomes a bit more difficult to correlate the info, but they still also know when a specific client with a specific phone number connects to their network. So maybe they have to run that timing attack over a few hours, but the end result is the same.

@chiefstorm