What are Lemmy’s feelings about the best cloud storage options these days, if you really want to break into the 1-2TB range? I’m not there yet, probably not even halfway there, but I like the peace of mind of potentially having the space if I need it. And I think subscribing to something in the Netflix price range is maybe something I’m ready for.

My thoughts so far:

pcloud - Intriguing because you can pay for a “lifetime” plan of 2TB of storage. But it’s $350, which is a lot, and I don’t know that I love the interface or usability, and I don’t know if I trust them.

iDrive - Super affordable. 5tb for “just” $80/year. It might be the best deal, but nothing about their identity suggests to me that they are “good guys.” By which I mean, I’m not sure I trust them to make long-term promises for any specific plan.

Mega - I like its very anti-google, very encrypted attitude. Born from the ashes of megaupload, they built encryption and zero knowledge into it. I LOVE that you can connect to it through the android app Solid Explorer and therefore don’t even need the mega app if you don’t want it. I hear bad things about it though? And it’s pretty expensive at $115 per year for 2TB.

My personal thoughts/reasoning/caveats:

Homebrew stuff: I don’t quite trust myself to use a homebrew setup like Nextcloud or Syncthing correctly. There’s too much in terms of labor, upkeep, catastrophic single points of failure where you could lose everything. I feel like I’m 70% of the way to being smart enough to do this.

Avoiding the Bad Guys and the Free Stuff: I’ve tried the free version of just about everything, from Google to Onedrive to Dropbox to Mediafire to Mega. There’s even an android app that offers 1 free terrabyte?? But I don’t want something from the bad guys where I’m going to be integrated into their closed source death drap: Google, Amazon, Microsoft, Apple, and I don’t want a too-good-to-be-true free service where I’m the product.

I also would prefer to avoid something from the upstarts who kinda-sorta imitate the bad guys: Dropbox, Mediafire, Box. Because I’m not sure how much I can trust any specific long term promise from them.

It sounds like you’re saying nothing is good enough! What exactly do you want!? Something from good guys, not bad guys. Something like Standardnotes, but for file storage. They emphasize privacy, good governance principles and longevity of their service. Or Linode, with their independence, sense of mission, love of Linux & free software, all of which tells me they are good guys.

Probably the correct answer is (1) here’s this magical perfect source I never thought of, or (2) I’m thinking this much about it, I should probably do Nextcloud or syncthing given all the constraints that I’m putting out there.

Anyway, that’s my thoughts on cloud storage. What are yours?

@sproid
link
57d

My general recommendation is to use a Nextcloud provider. Depending on how much you are willing to spend a vps will allow you to use encryption at the cost of some restrictions, o go cheaper using the shared instance. Either way you don’t have to manage backend & you can upgrade storage as needed. Since you’ll choose the provider that means there’s some trust, but for sensitive files or folders I’ll recommend you use something like Cryptomator. That way you don’t have to change or use another service for improve privacy and security. That means you could use Cryptomator on any of the services you already mentioned. I like pcloud as second option to Nextcloud. But Nextcloud is a more comprehensive alternative to GApps that Pcloud.

@abbenm
creator
link
14d

After some thinking, this is basically a perfect solution. Thank you :)

Dessalines
admin
link
108d

Don’t use cloud storage at all, use syncthing. If you really need a lot of disk space, that’s going to be the cheapest anyway.

@GenkiFeral
link
36d

I use both Syncthing and Nextcloud. nextcloud is automatic and, at least for me, I have to spend time and effort each time to use Syncthing. Maybe I set it up wrong. i use Syncthing to share PC-related things such as programs, themes, customized config files, wallpapers, and my beloved music and playlist files. Nextcloud is far easier and even easy on my phones. i had some trouble using Syncthing on phones - though, periodically i could make it sort of work. The articles I read all said Syncthing was a bit confusing and I agree.

Dessalines
admin
link
26d

Hrm, what do you have to do? Syncthing is made to be, set it up once, then forget about it.

@abbenm
creator
link
16d

Unfortunately my experience with Syncthing is that it has confused me, as well. But I think, if I got to the point I understood it, it would be a perfect, godsend alternative to something like Dropbox, as long as you have your own hardware to run everything.

@GenkiFeral
link
26d

I am no techie, but, yeah, StandardNotes is great. I have a free 2GB nextcloud acct, but there are paid accounts that are very affordable. I did make sync mistakes by trying to sync Obsidian (notes) with Nextcloud and their sync softwares conflicting causing a mess. I contacted the free provider, though, and they fixed what I tried to fix for months, but failed to. I think that is a rare case, so think Nextcloud is wonderful. Hope to set up a Pi server with my own Nextcoud and use the free account as a backup for a while (not sure how power outages or storm power surges could hurt a Pi). I am also very curious about Mega and Linode 9I thought Linode was for business accounts, though).

@abbenm
creator
link
16d

I agree. I think the collective wisdom here points me to a paid nextcloud instance.

You are right about Linode, they are not a fit for this use case. They were just one example I could think of as a company with a good ethos that I would like to see. And just a clear example that companies like that most definitely do exist, so it’s not all just bad guys.

@PointyFluff
link
98d

Your own NAS. Not your hardware, not your files.

@beansniffer
link
58d

Not your hardware, not your files.

While I agree that using your own NAS and actually having the ownership of your own files is the best option, with proprietary hardware backdoors like the Intel ME, it unfortunately seems very difficult to actually own the hardware we paid for. Everything is trending towards everyone owning nothing and renting everything as a service.

@abbenm
creator
link
28d

I mean I do have a my passport drive, but I guess I worry about the cost in terms of electricity of keeping a persistently connected and keeping my home computer persistently on. I know that’s technically not the same thing but a similar idea. I’m ready for the my passport drive to just die at any given time though, and then what, should I be copying between two drives regularly? I feel like a certain degree of planning and management is involved there that can get rather costly if you don’t have a good system.

krolden
link
68d

The power bill to keep a small nas running is gonna be a lot cheaper than any cloud storage of equal capacity.

@GenkiFeral
link
16d

Your own NAS. Not your hardware, not your files.

I rent and have a landlord and roommates, so this was a concern of mine, too. For personal use, a Rapberry Pi should be fine and uses the same wattage as some light bulbs (is it 15 watts, i forget). The Pi’s physical size is so small and light that I can connect the power supply/plug/cord to the Pi and have it all it the wall outlet without needing to set it onto the floor or something else. i used a hidden piece of velcro, but then had to wrap an ugly rubbed bad around it, too. Mine is headless, of course, but it is nice to know I could make it into a desktop unit later by adding a monitor, keyboard, and mouse.

@beansniffer
link
48d

Ok, I’m not sure I fully understand your comment but I will try my best to help.

A good backup system follows the concept of 3-2-1.

3 copies of your data (one of which includes the copy on your computer), on two separate storage mediums ( multiple hard drives from different manufacturers or an SSD or on archival blu-ray discs for example), and one of these copies being off-site (like in a safe at a family members house or online) to avoid destruction by things like a building fire.

If you are wanting storage that you own and can access from anywhere, perhaps one option might be something like a low-power single board computer like a Raspberry-pi 4, Odroid or something connected to a USB hard drive. Every month or so, take the files and transfer copies to another drive that you store in a different location. If you’re wanting something like an active file sync between your storage and another computer, using syncthing might be a solution.

Hope this helped!

Misha
link
38d

@beansniffer

@abbenm

I’m not an expert, but I’m quite happy with my “raspberry pi (RBP1) + Nextcloud (server) + hard disk (HD1)”-setup. I take daily backups/snapshots (using backintime) of that hard disk (HD1) on another hard disk (HD2). And I sometimes make backups to a completely offline hard disk (HD3). You could have another raspberry pi + Nextcloud (client) + hard disk at a friend’s/ family members place to protect against fire risk.

@abbenm
creator
link
27d

Thanks, I was a little unclear. I was trying to say that I have a Western digital My passport 1 TB hard drive, and well that’s not quite the same thing as NAS, it’s possibly similar for practical purposes.

321 as you’ve outlined it is a good and easily memorable system, so that gives me something to work with.

@ree
link
48d

The lifetime plan is such a scam. They gonna close the service in 2-3 year when it won’t be sustainable anymore.

For 350€ you can buy 2*4tb drive a low power mobo and electricity for a while.

@electric_nan
link
37d

There’s a lot of help out there for setting up a nextcloud server, either at your home, or on a VPS. Once you have the server up, you can have as many clients as you want, and each client can have a copy of any/all files you have on the server (each client storage space permitting). Depending on how much data you have (and file sizes), you’ll have multiple copies at any given time. That’s what I do.

Another thing you can do, is use something called ‘rclone’ to mount something like: google drive, onedrive, dropbox etc., as a network drive on your computer. Rclone has the ability to encrypt these folders, meaning google/dropbox/etc can’t see what your files are, but you can see them fine on your computer. You interact with your this mount as you would any other folder on your computer.

poVoq
link
58d

Hetzner also has a hosted Nextcloud: https://www.hetzner.com/storage/storage-share

@abbenm
creator
link
18d

Awesome, that looks really good! I love Nextcloud, and I love not having to manage it on my own hardware. I don’t know anything about Hetzner, but that’s probably really good for my use case.

poVoq
link
38d

Hetzner is one of the biggest German VPS rental companies. Super reliable and generally considered to have good price / value. Not much you can do wrong with them other that it is somewhat centralized (half of the Fediverse or so is hosted by them).

Kohen Shaw
link
38d

I’m using contabo for over a year now. Using they’re cheapest version, hosting a nextcloud instance with 300 GB of storage, €5 / month. It’s slow, but perfectly serviceable if you’re not relying on the web interface. Independent German company, in the business for a long time. Stable, reliable, not a single complaint.

Azure
link
38d

‘Cloud Storage’ is a bit underspecified. What are your use-cases, specifically?

Linode actually has a ‘cloud storage’ offering based on the Free ‘ceph’ distributed storage system’s implementation of S3.

I’m personally very fond of rsync.net, which you can access via scp/sftp.

@toneverends
link
17d

Rsync.net also have special Borg pricing: https://www.rsync.net/products/borg.html (USD18/100GB/year minimum).

@abbenm
creator
link
18d

My use case primarily is real time copying of photos and videos from my phone, and secondarily just any other files. And I’m thinking of something along the lines of Google drive or Dropbox or mega. Accessing via sFTP is awesome, and a huge amount of flexibility. I did not even realistically hope that any option would have that.

@toneverends
link
27d

Syncthing really seems to just work though. Slightly complicated to set up but only because it’s clear what it’s doing and there’s a lot of options to set juuuust right for each use case you can imagine. I mostly use it for syncing photo/music folders between linux desktop and android phone, and to have shared folders with friends and colleagues.

Not really for keeping sensitive data on untrusted servers, but there are efforts to enable encrypted storage on untrusted-devices: https://docs.syncthing.net/users/untrusted.html

Syncthing for syncing/sharing and encrypted borg backups out to rsync.net or own/friends NAS boxes for archiving.

@electric_nan
link
17d

Nextcloud has an ‘auto upload’ feature on the android client (idk about ios). You can set any number of local folders to upload any new files to your server. You can have it upload over mobile data, wifi, or both.

This video has some good options https://youtu.be/72lxrH7GmDg

Jesse
link
18d

I mean, you kind of just ran the gambit on the current state of consumer facing cloud storage. I’m not sure there are any options that aren’t from “bad guys”.

@abbenm
creator
link
1
edit-2
8d

I think I just mentioned the 6 or 7 most well known, and I bet there are dozens more options if not a hundred. On a community like Lemmy where people talk about Activitypub, Nextcloud, Pinephone, Simple Mobile Tools, Linux distros, etc there’s a chance that people know something I don’t about the far corners of the cloud storage internet.

edit: curious why this is downvoted? I noted (correctly!!!) that there’s a lot more to cloud storage than the 6-7 examples I listed, I gave a pretty good reason for believing there are better examples than the ones I listed, and sure enough commenters really did suggest something that matches my use case that was new to me.

I just don’t understand the internet sometimes.

@GenkiFeral
link
1
edit-2
6d

why this is downvoted?

Probably group-think. I am a bit shocked, too. Lazy-minded, weak-minded people dislike anything that seems like free-thought or wanting details and explanations (distinctions are so OFFENSIVE, classist, and biased- how DARE you question the status quo?!). I’ve been looking into the same topic as your post and haven’t found the best answers online - after much reading. For now, I have settled with compartmentalization: I use the more public drives such as Ynadex and Google for public things such as photos I find on public sites (decor, fashion, macro photography, etc). I explained the rest above, but left out that I send my passwords & IDs file from Protonmail to tutanota email as an extra step. If I ever manage to get keypass set up (it is hard!), i’ll try to send that file the same way as back up. I put the date in the title and update once a month or more.

A loosely moderated place to ask open ended questions

If your post is

  1. Open ended
  2. Not offensive
  3. Not regarding lemmy support (c/lemmy_support)
  4. not ad nauseam inducing (please make sure its a question that would be new to most members)

it’s welcome here!

  • 0 users online
  • 38 users / day
  • 160 users / week
  • 334 users / month
  • 653 users / 6 months
  • 2.48K subscribers
  • 788 Posts
  • 10.8K Comments
  • Modlog