So after 7 months from my switch to GNU/Linux i’ve been studying many aspects from the OS and after seeing this 2016 Linux Foundation Report a question has been on my mind lately.

How to improve my skills like a true specialist in open source?

Applying to a certification on Linux Foundation sounds a good idea but when converting the price to my currency, it gets a bit too expensive.

poVoq
31M

Look for some Linux certification institutes in your country?

But in general: have a github account as your CV. Regular and good contributions to open source projects will be very helpful.

kurigohankamehameha
creator
125d

Hello, thank you so much for your reply.

Yeah, i’ve being searching about it for a while and github surely looks the more straight forward way for me getting into open source, but isn’t like i’m not used to open source, i’m more a open source user than a dev.

@ajz
225d

You can always contribute to open source apart from coding software. For example help with translations for open source software, or answer questions to complete Linux newbies on IRC, forums etc. or help with packaging (For example AUR or other repositories). And that can be part of a learning process to improve your own knowledge.

kurigohankamehameha
creator
121d

On last days IRC has become a word i’ve heard a lot, guess i’m going to search further about it. btw i find your avatar so cute, did you draw it?

@ajz
1
edit-2
21d

I think IRC can be a fairly easy way to communicate with a group of a project, though IRC certainly has its drawbacks.

btw i find your avatar so cute, did you draw it?

Thanks. Generated with software from F-Droid. https://f-droid.org/en/packages/com.agateau.catgenerator/

poVoq
125d

But do you want to become a dev? For sysadmin work (i.e. mostly non-dev) you probably really need some kind of Linux certification, but dev work (aside from getting a computer science degree or such) really mostly requires coding experience best proven with active contributions to open-source projects.

kurigohankamehameha
creator
121d

actually i want to get into both, dev for helping open source projects and sysadmin for spreading GNU/Linux on my town. apologies for my late reply, but lately i’ve been searching about it and as you said indeed certifications are mostly required on sysadmins job

@robb
31M

Don’t know what you mean by “specialist”. Also not sure if you’d be looking into getting into software dev, devops or something else. Either way, making your first step in the open source space as a contributor is always to contribute.

Look at the software you are using, check their git pages, see what kind of help they need and then see if and how you can help. This can be writing code, writing documentantion, proof reading documentaion, helping out with translations / documentation, artwork and much more.

Starting to contribute will help you get familiar with various git flows and make you feel comfortable in an open source dev environment. From there it kind of starts rolling.

kurigohankamehameha
creator
125d

I’m grateful for your reply.

I’ve being really doubtful about joining GitHub as it looks very “professional” and i’m still a newbie, but try it won’t hurt me, i guess.

Actually i’m heading into being a dev, i really like this kind of stuff. Being surround by a bunch of servers while coding and hearing “beep boop” from the machines is really enjoying for me.

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