@k_o_t
admin
63M

iOS devices

i’m intrigued

not that i don’t care about android, but that making something that works with iOS is typically more of a challenge, because of these devices don’t support loading unsigned kernels…

poVoq
23M

Hmm, yeah. Initially I thought it might be a lib-hybris based version of Manjaro, similar to Ubuntu Touch. But that would be Android only. Lets wait and see I guess.

@SirLotsaLocks
creator
23M

I feel like it’s going to be something virtualized because I don’t see anything coming to iphone on bare metal.

poVoq
23M

Maybe a streaming service? /s

@k_o_t
admin
13M

why not? jailbreaking is perfectly legal, maybe sideloading something this way would be possible… 🤔

however to rely on jailbreaks occurring steadily is a bit weird, i guess we’ll see

@SirLotsaLocks
creator
23M

jailbreaking is different from putting a whole new OS on an iphone. One person got ubuntu on their iphone 7 but iirc the screen didn’t even work. The iphone is explicitely designed to only ever be able to run iOS and that’s it. It would be badass to have manjaro on an iphone though.

@k_o_t
admin
2
edit-2
3M

jailbreaking is different from putting a whole new OS on an iphone

for sure, but manjaro never specified that’s it’s na entire separate operating system

i mentioned jailbreaking as a means to make some special modification to your ios device, something manjaro wouldn’t otherwise be able to do via app store

@SirLotsaLocks
creator
13M

oh I see, that’d be interesting.

Arch_guy
33M

great step.

@marcuse1w
23M

Cool cool cool

@avalos
13M

It will probably be virtualised, I can tell from the screenshot showing the Android system navigation bar and that thing in the middle top that you pull to show the notification bar in fullscreen apps. Besides, they say “your Android and iOS tablets,” which might imply that Manjaro will run on top of the OS.

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