danoon2/Boxedwine
github.com
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It achieves this by running an unmodified 32-bit version of Wine, and emulating the Linux kernel and CPU. It is written in C++ with SDL and is supported on multiple platforms.

This is pretty crazy if you ask me.

Arch_guy
22M

Wow

@blank_sl8
12M

Why not just emulate Windows directly instead? Is it that much easier to emulate Linux?

@ArtilectZed
2
edit-2
2M

Quote from danoon:

Yes, the goal of Boxedwine is to run old Windows programs in a platform independent way without a VM or disk images. So basically it is Dosbox but for Windows. At first I started out writing my own Win32 API implementation, and it worked for the first couple of games. But eventually I saw it was more than 1 person could do. That is when I realized Wine was the only solution and since that only worked on Linux, I had to create minimal Linux emulator to run Wine. Implementing the kernal syscalls did take some time. But It is capable to running emulated threads and processes in a single threaded app, which is why it works with Emscripten.

https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=26924884

@Anachron
creator
22M

Yes, Windows has parts nobody knows how they work, they even admitted some original source code was lost and so they only have the compiled program and/or interface, but no documentation on how it works.

Relected
12M

Wooooooow, how did they mess that up?

@Anachron
creator
42M

IIRC the original programmer left and due to some internal restructuring they lost the source. The funny thing is I can’t seem to find the article anymore, but I’ll keep looking.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Linux is a family of open source Unix-like operating systems based on the Linux kernel, an operating system kernel first released on September 17, 1991 by Linus Torvalds. Linux is typically packaged in a Linux distribution (or distro for short).

Distributions include the Linux kernel and supporting system software and libraries, many of which are provided by the GNU Project. Many Linux distributions use the word “Linux” in their name, but the Free Software Foundation uses the name GNU/Linux to emphasize the importance of GNU software, causing some controversy.

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