So a lot of crops are fertilized with manure, which usually comes from the cattle industry, and to my knowledge, there’s no reliable way to tell what the plant-based foods you’re buying is fertilized with.

Some crops are fertilized with processed sewage sludge and/or food waste, but since most humans still eat meat, would you consider this vegan? Side note, processing of sewage and food waste is often also used to generate electricity, heat, and in some cases the methane is added directly to the municipal natural gas supply, would you consider these services no longer vegan in that case.

Finally, and I guess this is mainly relevant to those who are vegans for environmentalism, but the only real alternative to manure is chemical fertilizers, often made from petroleum, and have their own environmental problems. I guess you could cut out the cow by harvesting hay and putting it in a digester to make fertilizer, but as far as I know, no one currently does this since it would be a lot more expensive than both manure and chemical fertilizer.

What do you make of this? Does it bother you, or are you okay with it, or have you even found alternatives to these problems?

I’m a bit torn on this. On the one hand, it makes livestock keeping more profitable because the manure can be sold or at least disposed without having to pay expensive disposal fees. On the other hand, I think as long as there is animal husbandry, it’s the best to make use of all byproducts. Using the dung doesn’t further harm the animals but can be beneficial for agriculture without doubt.

That said, overfertilization is a huge problem and with the current dimensions of industrial livestock farming, it’s more damaging for the soil rather than being beneficial. It’s often just cheap disposal of the sewage.

I don’t care at all. If there was a bigger vegan movement I think it would be cool to have more veganic farming, but I don’t care otherwise.

Farming with animal manure is the same problem to me as buying something from a person that’s not vegan, which I don’t have an issue with at all.

@dengismceo
44M

fertilized with processed sewage sludge

thanks, i never want to eat again

i hate the idea of fertilizer but barring growing your own food, which is not an option for everyone, we kinda just have to deal until an alternative is viable & implemented

@AgreeableLandscape
admin
creator
2
edit-2
4M

fertilized with processed sewage sludge

thanks, i never want to eat again

I mean, that’s not that different from how nature does it. Poop and corpses fertilize plants, which continues the nutrient cycle. Personally I don’t find it too gross.

@qoheniac
34M

I don’t think anywhere in nature is the poop density nearly as high as on many farm lands.

@dengismceo
24M

i know lmao it’s just that phrasing makes it sound even worse. i think it’s the “sludge” that really does it

@AgreeableLandscape
admin
creator
2
edit-2
4M

That’s actually the technical term for the solid stuff after sewage is separated. The water is called “effluent.”

@dengismceo
34M

huh, til. still doesn’t make it better tho :rolling on the floor laughing:

I found this article amazing. It changed my mind about several things WRT food production, and the issues you’re talking about. https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2021/02/phosphorus-pollution-fertilizer/617937/

Dessalines
admin
3
edit-2
4M

I have to look it up to find the actual numbers, but manure hasn’t technically been needed since the haber process. Sure they use the manure because its surplus and they have nothing else to do with it, but the rapid growth in food production is because of soil nitrogen-fixation via NOT animals, but synthetic fertilizers.

From wiki:

Nearly 50% of the nitrogen found in human tissues originated from the Haber–Bosch process.[50] Thus, the Haber process serves as the “detonator of the population explosion”, enabling the global population to increase from 1.6 billion in 1900 to 7.7 billion by November 2018.[51]

  • 0 users online
  • 1 user / day
  • 7 users / week
  • 13 users / month
  • 63 users / 6 months
  • 412 subscribers
  • 110 Posts
  • 320 Comments
  • Modlog