• Sequentialsilence@lemmy.world
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    26 days ago

    I was on a camping trip in Panama, and because there’s no service in the jungle, didn’t know that a hurricane was coming. I rode out hurricane David in a tent on the side of a mountain.

    Surprisingly I’m no longer a fan of camping.

    • lemmyseizethemeans@lemmygrad.ml
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      26 days ago

      I saw reactor 4 building explode on live TV and immediately fled the city. If the winds hadn’t blown out all that radioactive material to the ocean (where US sailors actually got radiation poisoning on a ship east of Fukushima) but had instead blown it south, Japan’s economy would have totally collapsed.

      • Drusas@kbin.run
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        26 days ago

        By “the city”, do you mean Tokyo?

        It was a very bizarre feeling when I finally managed to get to Tokyo and everything was so…normal. I’d been trapped in Fukushima for eight days with minimal food and water at that point. Lost eight pounds. Worried constantly about radiation. Had no clean clothes. What would normally have been a two hour bullet train ride from there to Tokyo ended up taking two days as the route south was still closed when a path to the west opened up.

        Then eventually I got to Tokyo, feeling like a haggard refugee, and everyone was going about their lives as normal. Very surreal.

  • Ekky@sopuli.xyz
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    26 days ago

    The Baltic sea just had a once-in-a-century storm surge this fall. There was little danger since the baltic sea is rather well protected, but many local dikes weren’t up for the job, resulting in quite some damage (in general, the houses on my island were mostly unscathered).

    Took us the better of two months to drain the water from the island, and in the meantime we had to hike along the more robust dikes to get to the harbor.

    We also had to empty our lakes of saltwater to attempt and save our fire-bellied toads, as the Copenhagen Zoo is trying to preserve the species on the island.

    • jol@discuss.tchncs.de
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      25 days ago

      First of all, dyke is not a good word to call lesbians. And also it’s unfair to expect them to build things against super strong storms, construction is mostly a hobby for most of them. And third- oh you’re talking about dams.

      • Ekky@sopuli.xyz
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        24 days ago

        Yeah, I’ve been bamboozled by this before. Found out that both “dike” and “dyke” mean “water barrier” but also can be slurs.

        I guess it depends on context and audience, though, I hope the context is clear in this case. :P

        Edit: Also, “dam” doesn’t fit since it’s an island and not a river or lake. The island does have dams, but those are not nearly as important as the dikes.

        • Machinist@lemmy.world
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          25 days ago

          Dikes or pair of dikes also refers to diagonal cutters. (Look like pliers with blades instead of jaws at the end) They are used for cutting sheet metal, also, wire cutters are also called dikes. Can also be used as a verb: Dike off the corner of that piece of steel, or, dike out that part of the circuit.

          My wife is bi and it always messes with her when I say it. Just a trade term.

  • Zagorath@aussie.zone
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    26 days ago

    2022 Australian floods. Woken up pre-dawn by a car alarm set off by rising flood waters. Thankfully I had the foresight to park up on the street, which was a higher level, because water was more than half way up the height of the wheels by then in my garage.

    All the proper roads out of the area were flooded already before I left, but thankfully I could get out by driving through pedestrian areas of the university I live near.

    That was a very anxiety-ridden day as I waited until I could go back to assess the damage. Luckily the water only reached about 3/4 the height of the garage, which is below the 1st floor apartments. My apartment is at the top of a very small (like 5 m vertical) hill, just enough that we got off safe when neighbours did far, far worse.

    • RedditRefugee69@lemmy.world
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      25 days ago

      For any Americans, the 1st floor in Australia (and many other countries) is equivalent to the second floor in America (hence it being above the garage)

      • Zagorath@aussie.zone
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        25 days ago

        I hate that convention. No, I was using the first floor in the American way…sort of.

        The apartment is on the side of the hill. The lowest level on which apartments are placed is at ground level at the front, but one storey up at the back.

          • MutilationWave@lemmy.world
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            25 days ago

            Pretty common in hilly areas in my country and especially my state. For my house, you have to climb about fifteen stairs to go in the front door and the back door is ground level. It’s a small one storey house.

  • boogetyboo@aussie.zone
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    26 days ago

    2003 Canberra bushfires. My little city was made to burn.

    2019 Black Summer bushfires - see: whole fucking country either on fire or enveloped in smoke. I owned a tonne of masks before Covid hit.

    We’ve been lucky in the last few bushfires seasons since but it won’t last.

    • bestusername@aussie.zone
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      26 days ago

      2019-2020 was fucked up!

      I wasn’t in direct danger from the fire, but close enough that we couldn’t really go outside due to smoke and ash, many occasions we couldn’t see the house across the road. My kids school kept them inside most days. We couldn’t leave town for fear of being cut off.

      Combined with the summer heat, no aircon, and not being able to open the windows, it got to 38° in our loungeroom a few times. I was studying the wind charts madly for those brief periods in wind shift where the smoke from one fire was blown away and before the next fire blew in. We had fires north, east and south of us.

      And then COVID hit.

  • lattrommi
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    26 days ago

    The 2019 Memorial Day tornado outbreak. Less than a week away from the 5 year anniversary of it.

    My apartment is located roughly 500 feet (152 meters) from the end point of an EF4 tornado that hit and about 1500 feet (~450 meters) of the start point of an EF3 tornado that hit. One ended and the other began within minutes of each other.

    I recall I looked out of my front door and could only see the sideways winds. I had just woken up after sleeping all day because I was tired, having stayed up late the night before, burying my cat which had eaten mouse poison, which I was unaware of the symptoms for until it was too late. I had to bury my cat a second time then next day and broke my hand in frustration while doing it.

    My power was out for 10 days and I had no water for 6 days. I didn’t own a car and public transportation had halted in my area from trees blocking the roads. I walked 4.5 miles to a nearby Urgent Care for my hand but they had closed due to damage. From there I walked 9 miles to the nearest hospital. They had too many people. I gave up waiting to be seen after 8 hours and went home, then wrapped my hand with bandages myself, around an old brace I had from a previous unrelated broken wrist.

    When my power came back, I learned that a power surge had fried the power supply of my computer. I eventually managed to check my email at the community college, which is when I learned my health insurance coverage through Medicaid had ended, thanks to an order from the president at the time.

    My absentee landlord never checked on the building. Less than a month later, the in-wall A/C unit fell out of the wall, leaving a hole large enough for me, a 6’3" 250 lb man, to easily crawl through. It was there for 6 months before it was repaired by the landlords maintenance person, who bought a cheap window unit A/C and stuck it in the hole then filled in around it with expanding foam.

    The hole was ‘fixed’ around the same time I was able to buy a replacement power supply for my computer. My data storage drive had also stopped working and I learned an important lesson regarding backups. That was right around Christmas time.

    Unrelated to the tornados, that’s about when I started passing kidney stones. I tried to go to the hospital for them but without insurance, they turned me away. It wasn’t considered an emergency. I missed several days of work while I passed them at home. Work said because of the amount of time I missed, I needed a doctors note to return to work. Work would schedule me 6 hour shifts, 6 days a week, which comes to 36 hours. Employees needed 40 hours a week to be considered full time and to qualify for the company insurance. Without insurance, I couldn’t find a doctor who would see me. I was terminated and the reason they listed was that I abandoned my job.

    My official last day with the company was 31 December 2019. I was ready to start a new year. 2019 had not been kind to me. I remember thinking to myself on New Years Day “At least 2020 can’t possibly be worse, right?”

  • plactagonic@sopuli.xyz
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    26 days ago

    Slow one but- several years of drought and then bug infestation of some of our forests.

    It affected badly planted forests (monocultures) but still it is sad to see bare places you remember covered.

    There are several of these man made disasters around here but this one is most visible.

  • A_Chilean_Cyborg@feddit.cl
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    25 days ago

    2010 chilean Earthquake and tsunami (8.8), and the 2016-17 forest fires too

    Chile has an extreme propensity to natural disasters, but Chileans have learn to deal with them so they aren’t that bad, like after the 2010 8.8 quake there was an 8.5 or so in 2015 that caused little damage because lessons were learned, consider that quakes over 6.0 happens every year or two in chile, also we have floods, forest fires? Volcanoes, landslide, etc.

    My grandma felt the 9.5 Valdivia quake (biggest earthquake recorded in world history) and shortly after started working in the ministry of infrastructure, she always says she had to type “devastated area” a lot lol, my mom also felt her fair share of quakes too, and my parents were just away from Santiago (the city where we live) when a enormous flood hit here and caused a ton of damage, and we’re not talking about the natural disasters that happened in other areas of the county, like more quakes, floods, forest fires and volcanoes…

    Yeah, if you want to safely-ish experience natural disasters, come live in chile! Lmao.

    • bionicjoey@lemmy.ca
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      25 days ago

      God damn. You make Chileans sound like the Fremen. Living in the most inhospitable planet in the galaxy and it hones them into a deadly society of warriors.

  • YurkshireLad@lemmy.ca
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    26 days ago

    Hurricane Irene in the Caribbean in, what, 2011? Luckily we were tucked up safely in a hotel with a concrete structure but it still scared the crap out of us.

    We thought our windows and patio door were going to blow out and we used all the bedding and towels to stop water coming in under the door. It soaked up so much water that we couldn’t lift them in the morning.

    Thankfully I think it dropped to a cat 2 (?) as it hit land, so damage wasn’t as bad as expected. Still, our hearts broke when we saw the damage to the island and homes as we returned to the airport a few days later. I don’t know how the locals deal with it every year.