he/him/his, cis, gay, husband, Beagle chew-toy, JavaScript jockey, Rustacean

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Joined 1Y ago
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Cake day: Apr 06, 2021

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I really like that it exists, but I’m not sure where it would fit for me Not sure I personally need anything between smartphone and laptop I could imagine myself buying one anyway though just out of curiosity :)






Could be that there are enough middle-boxes inspecting/manipulating plain-text traffic? And those boxes do nothing (or do less) when the traffic is encrypted?


About the only thing we can really do about Microsoft is to stop using Windows/Office/Azure, stop buying computers that are preloaded with Windows/Office, stop buying and playing Xbox, etc

Stop directly giving money to any company that we cannot trust

If we don’t do these things, then Microsoft will continue to have the power to do things, and we’ll only have ourselves to blame


It’s at feature-parity for me, personally

I’ve been using it for at least 2 years (via GNOME, then sway, now river), and it’s pretty rare now that I hit a rough patch or a paper cut

Even Zoom seems like it’s finally doing screen-capture via proper xdg-desktop-portal requests now, which is nice


> The Digital Advertising Act is a bold, promising legislative proposal. It could split apart the most toxic parts of Big Tech to make the internet more competitive, more decentralized, and more respectful of users’ digital human rights, like the right to privacy. As with any complex legislation, the impacts of this bill must be thoroughly explored before it becomes law. But we believe in the methods described in the bill: they have the power to reshape the internet for the better.

> The Digital Advertising Act is a bold, promising legislative proposal. It could split apart the most toxic parts of Big Tech to make the internet more competitive, more decentralized, and more respectful of users’ digital human rights, like the right to privacy. As with any complex legislation, the impacts of this bill must be thoroughly explored before it becomes law. But we believe in the methods described in the bill: they have the power to reshape the internet for the better.

Yeah, I’ve been using Wayland for years now and haven’t looked back


I have a feeling that EFF would be delighted that good security/privacy is becoming easier and becoming the default


> Gold and certain other precious metals are key ingredients in computer chips, including those used in consumer electronics such as smart phones. But it can be difficult to recover and recycle those metals from electronic waste. Japanese researchers have found that a pigment widely used by artists called Prussian blue can extract gold and platinum-group metals from e-waste much more efficiently than conventional bio-based absorbents, according to a recent paper published in the journal Scientific Reports.

Wow, I'm weirdly close to the same age as the X Windows System


Yeah, I hate the excitement over any potential “fix” that doesn’t require us to change our way of life even just slightly

Living slightly less convenient but also less wasteful lives is the solution, and we could do it now if we just had the (political) will


Just finished all the available issues of the Heartstopper comic, and now I am feeling all the feelings! Go watch the TV adaptation on Netflix if you can, this has got to be the cutest, sweetest, wholesome-est story ever! I'm obsessed!

I’m on my first re-watch since reading them all, and it’s even more moving now


Just finished all the available issues of the Heartstopper comic, and now I am feeling all the feelings! Go watch the TV adaptation on Netflix if you can, this has got to be the cutest, sweetest, wholesome-est story ever! I'm obsessed!

Okay, I could be wrong about this, but …

My understanding is that from e.g. Facebook’s perspective, they previously would be able to see that you visited a newspaper website, and then a food delivery website, and then a furniture review website (assuming all of these websites had Facebook like/share/login buttons somewhere, and even if you never click these Facebook buttons)

But, with Total Cookie Protection, from Facebook’s perspective, they know someone visited the newspaper website, and they know someone (maybe someone else) visited the food delivery website, and they know someone (maybe yet another person) visited the furniture review website: they can’t connect the dots

However, the above example assumes that you aren’t logged in to Facebook

I’m actually not sure how this would be different if you were logged in to Facebook

Or, what if you actually did want to use the Facebook login on all of these websites? I suppose from Facebook’s perspective you have 3x different computers? And in terms of user experience, you have to log in to Facebook 3x times?


> If procrastination is a symptom of emotional discomfort, that means it’s your brain’s way of telling you what you need in that moment. The trick is recognizing and interpreting your procrastination in the right way. Fortunately, Mss. Fosslien and Duffy’s research revealed several helpful clues.

> It’s time for governments to address the reality that five tech companies—not everyday consumers—control our online experiences today. Updated competition laws are essential for the internet to be private, secure, interoperable, open, accessible, transparent, and a balance between commercial profit and public benefit. This is Mozilla’s vision for the internet. For a number of years, we have shared our views supporting government competition efforts globally to achieve it.

> For the last year I’ve been leading the development of rust-minidump, a pure-Rust replacement for the minidump-processing half of google-breakpad. > > Well actually in some sense I finished that work, because Mozilla already deployed it as the crash processing backend for Firefox 6 months ago, it runs in half the time, and seems to be more reliable. (And you know, isn’t a terrifying ball of C++ that parses and evaluates arbitrary input from the internet. We did our best to isolate Breakpad, but still… yikes.)

> Today’s release of Total Cookie Protection is the result of experimentation and feature testing, first in ETP Strict Mode and Private Browsing windows, then in Firefox Focus earlier this year. We’re now making it a default feature for all Firefox desktop users worldwide.

> Today’s release of Total Cookie Protection is the result of experimentation and feature testing, first in ETP Strict Mode and Private Browsing windows, then in Firefox Focus earlier this year. We’re now making it a default feature for all Firefox desktop users worldwide.

> Today’s release of Total Cookie Protection is the result of experimentation and feature testing, first in ETP Strict Mode and Private Browsing windows, then in Firefox Focus earlier this year. We’re now making it a default feature for all Firefox desktop users worldwide.

Dialogs and shadow DOM: can we make it accessible?
> Last year, I wrote about managing focus in the shadow DOM, and in particular about modal dialogs. Since the <dialog> element has now shipped in all browsers, and the inert attribute is starting to land too, I figured it would be a good time to take another look at getting dialogs to play nicely with shadow DOM. > > This post is going to get pretty technical, especially when it comes to the nitty-gritty details of accessibility and web standards. If you’re into that, then buckle up! The ride may be a bit bumpy.



The mature answer is “it depends”

Absolutes are rarely 100% true, and it entirely depends on your perspective, your use cases, and your expectations

Neither DuckDuckGo nor CloudFlare (the other favourite punching bag around here) have surveillance capitalism business models, but they do require you to trust someone else’s software running on someone else’s computers, and you still need to communicate with them over someone else’s networks

From my own perspective, which suits me fine but might not suitable for you, I prefer to avoid surveillance capitalism companies like Facebook/Meta, Amazon, Google

I’m also not a free-speech maximalist: I want to live in a world where information flows freely, but I acknowledge that not every single idea deserves exactly the same amplification

The same people screeching about DuckDuckGo and CloudFlare regarding censorship are often exactly the same people claiming that LGBTQIA and Black history education is not “age appropriate”, so even free-speech maximalists are rarely consistent


> Music streaming company Spotify will donate $109,000 (100k EUR) to independent, actively maintained, open source projects that align with the company’s core values. It has also opened a dedicated Open Source Program Office (OSPO) to further promote sustainability in the open source ecosystem. Engineer Per Ploug Krogslund will head the office.

I agree with this criticism of the bill: > Zoe Lofgren, the Democratic representative from California, said: “As a matter of principle we have never legislated on the basis of making rules for five companies that are different from everyone else. The way it is crafted is problematic.” These specific companies are not the only bad actors, so it seems better to define a category and target the whole category Aside from that, seems like bills like these are sorely needed across the planet

I don’t know if the project supports other destination languages, but I wonder if it always uses the language that your browser is set to?


It’d be nice if it wasn’t possible to be both this powerful and this uneducated


Yeah, I deeply wish it wasn’t possible for companies to conceal the true cost of something and intentionally run at a loss

It just creates an unsustainable mess, that inevitably comes undone

If it costs $30 per user to run the service, then charge that, simple


I finished season 4 of Disenchantment this week
I have found the show enjoyable and amusing so far, and I'm a competion-ist so I simply must watch every episode they give us And yet I'm sort of hoping that season 5 is the series finale The characters are charming, but I'm feeling less engaged by the plot as each season arrives (no, I will not make a "I'm disenchanted" joke, oh, oops)

I found Jibaro very visually striking and a little haunting


UEFI Secure Boot ended up being a pretty good example of how to do cryptographic requirements well: require signatures, but allow the owner of the hardware to use their own keys