Use Vim
14

Just a little blog post I created ^^ Feel free to share. There are no analytics collection on this site.

adamsky
510M

Even if one doesn’t become a master vim user, which really requires some serious effort and possibly years of training, just learning the basics can already save time and just overall make programming more of a joyful experience.

@Eli
410M

Use emacs and vim or try at least both before deciding for what to use which. Both pieces of art, imo.

@Czernobog
410M

I did! I started with vim. It was pretty decent imho. I learned some basics in a day and got bored then I installed emacs. Never looked back after that! lol.

@Atemu
110M

Or, even better, use both!

Evil-mode may sound like a novelty addon but it’s a real thing you can actually use in your everyday life.

@Eli
1
edit-2
10M

Maybe i should change my nick to Salomon. But then i gotta show y’all the invisible purple hat full of green numbers, i am wearing…:smiling face with smiling eyes: . So i omitted this test.

@Siborgium
1
edit-2
9M

deleted by creator

@eskimofry
3
edit-2
10M

Hi, website is responsive to screen size… is it part of CSS or did you incorporate any library?

@penloy
creator
410M

The responsiveness to screensize is achieved by using the <meta> html tag:

<meta name=“viewport” content=“width=device-width, initial-scale=1”>

https://css-tricks.com/snippets/html/responsive-meta-tag/

The responsive screensize has nothing to do with any library or css.

However, I do use Javascript for other things in this website, but it’s all FOSS. view the source code for the website here:

https://codeberg.org/penloy/penloycom

@eskimofry
310M

Thanks for the explanation!

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Linux is a family of open source Unix-like operating systems based on the Linux kernel, an operating system kernel first released on September 17, 1991 by Linus Torvalds. Linux is typically packaged in a Linux distribution (or distro for short).

Distributions include the Linux kernel and supporting system software and libraries, many of which are provided by the GNU Project. Many Linux distributions use the word “Linux” in their name, but the Free Software Foundation uses the name GNU/Linux to emphasize the importance of GNU software, causing some controversy.

Community icon by Alpár-Etele Méder, licensed under CC BY 3.0

  • 0 users online
  • 42 users / day
  • 82 users / week
  • 170 users / month
  • 341 users / 6 months
  • 3147 subscribers
  • 793 Posts
  • 2300 Comments
  • Modlog