Specifically because I live in a hot climate, I’m always fighting the feeling of being suspicious of anybody I pass in the streets with a hoodie pulled up. I feel guilty because of racial profiling associated with hoodies, but gotta protect myself and my family, especially because in many cases the perpetrators of assault and murder seen in media are somebody with a hood and/or mask on.

  • octopus_ink
    link
    fedilink
    English
    arrow-up
    2
    ·
    2 months ago

    So I looked at your link.

    The article seems to be about the fact that it’s racially charged, and that people reporting it may be doing so out of racism

    But in the year following Martin’s death, **the number of crimes reported with “Suspect wore hood/hoodie” skyrocketed. In 2013, there were 1,243 reports, a 92% increase from 2012. **

    While this was the largest jump since 2010 (when the data became publicly available), the data show the number of suspects being labeled as wearing hoods or hoodies rising each year.

    This year, in the first six months, there were 2,510 crimes with “Suspect wore hood/hoodie,” a 29.5% increase from the first six months of 2018, which had 1,938 reported crimes.

    How do you read the first quoted bit, then uncritically present the rest of the numbers as being in support of your suspicion??

    • venusaur@lemmy.worldOP
      link
      fedilink
      arrow-up
      1
      arrow-down
      1
      ·
      2 months ago

      You missed my point that despite caps/hats being the next largest attire being reported, I don’t feel guilty being suspicious of it. I feel guilty about being suspicious of hoodies because I’m aware of racism. I am not suspicious of hoodies because of racism.

      You’re incorrectly assuming I’m only suspicious of people in hoodies.