Swooping

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  • 72 Comments
Joined 8M ago
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Cake day: Jul 31, 2020

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Whether the populace has guns or not doesn’t matter for the purpose of maintaining leverage against the state when the authorities have drones, tanks and a military air force. It does however matter for everyone’s security, as evidenced by the crime rate in the US compared to countries in the EU. At least I don’t have to worry about shootings in the grocery store here in Sweden.


Sorry to hear :( Hope you pull out ok.


Open source robot vacuum, or home-assistant robots in general. All the options available out there are just a bunch of proprietary, patented, cloud-controlled, privacy-invading buckets running on rented software.


Makes me want to visit! (also I don’t know why my brain connected steppes to Scotland lol)


That sounds lovely. Scotland?



I also couldn’t get through it, even though I really wanted to for the world itself. It was just too much like an action movie with the action scenes distracting from the interesting stuff. I don’t know if that’s a fair take–it’s been a while since then–but that’s how I remember it.




We have a !veloren@lemmy.ml community as well




Some highlights of what’s new since 0.8:

Visual upgrades:

  • Glow and reflection effects
  • Snow particles

Additional Landscape features:

  • Giant tree sites
  • Cliffs
  • Procedural trees (limited to oaks and pines for now)

Trading and interactions:

  • Trading merchants
  • NPC interactions
  • Player-player and player-NPC trading via a new trading interface
  • Talk animation

Misc:

  • Birds flying throughout the world
  • Flyable airships
  • New skill tree system which replaces the old levelling system
  • Poise mechanics for melee combat
  • Economic simulation improvements
  • Lots of other little changes and additions (more weapons, skills, animals, dungeon enemies and more)

Some highlights of what’s new since 0.8:

Visual upgrades:

  • Glow and reflection effects
  • Snow particles

Additional Landscape features:

  • Giant tree sites
  • Cliffs
  • Procedural trees (limited to oaks and pines for now)

Trading and interactions:

  • Trading merchants
  • NPC interactions
  • Player-player and player-NPC trading via a new trading interface
  • Talk animation

Misc:

  • Birds flying throughout the world
  • Flyable airships
  • New skill tree system which replaces the old levelling system
  • Poise mechanics for melee combat
  • Economic simulation improvements
  • Lots of other little changes and additions (more weapons, skills, animals, dungeon enemies and more)

We’re holding a party to celebrate the release of pre-alpha version 0.9. …


We’re holding a party to celebrate the release of pre-alpha version 0.9. …

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US centrism. I tried to unsub from the worst offending communities, but I still am unable to scroll down a page without seeing something obviously only relevant to the US or tainted by yankee culture. posts and comments assume everyone is USian and anyone who isn’t is treated like a foreigner.

It made my mood worse, affecting my daily life. So I cut down, and now I barely go there at all.




This week, we have many writeups. We hear from @zesterer, @Christof, @Sarra_Kitty, @Sam, @VincentFoulon80, and @aweinstock. …


This week, we have many writeups. We hear from @zesterer, @Christof, @Sarra_Kitty, @Sam, @VincentFoulon80, and @aweinstock. …

3

Those types of communities have a place. People often discover or start watching shows late but still wish to discuss their thoughts and feelings and memes. It may be low volume but that’s okay too.


Off-topic, but the US-centrism is what put me off reddit entirely. I just can’t go there anymore because it makes me immediately feel like a foreigner in another country. I sometimes wish there was an internet-wide filter for anything US.


In addition to my other comment (which is more about paradigms than Haskell in particular), I think the main draws of Haskell is that it’s the most well-known statically typed and pure functional language out there. It’s mature, has a reasonably large community and an OK ecosystem. (I say OK rather than good because it’s rather lacking in some areas like GUI bindings and gamedev but sort of makes up for it with solid “backend”-oriented libraries.)

It strikes a nice balance of type safety, convenience and readability compared to other languages that feature more expressive type systems and safety guarantees, or impure and untyped functional languages which may be more “straight forward” to use but may bite you in more complex projects with hard to find IO- and type-related bugs.

The syntax is clean and terse, reducing boilerplate and visual noise for reading and writing, letting you allocate your mental energy to the concepts and semantics more than the details of implementation and technicalities. You spend more time thinking than looking when reading source code, or typing while writing it.

The type system is expressive enough to act as documentation in their own right (not to say they replace comments and actual documentation!), while also offering escapes for when you think yourself cleverer than the type checker, such as when an edge case really isn’t much of a problem, or when you know something makes sense but don’t wish to prove it.

It’s lazily evaluated, which enables you to think less about the operational semantics and more about the concept you’re trying to encode. You can compose and chain operations on very large lists or sets without having to worry about the programme iterating over all of it and evaluating everything; it will only evaluate exactly what you need and no more than that.

I would write more but I’ve procrastinated enough for today…


It does force you to think more before you write code, but how much depends on the complexity and requirements of the project.

In a pure functional and statically typed language like Haskell it is even more true because it will let you know about all the things that could go wrong or that don’t make sense. You’ll be made aware of possible failure which allows you to consider the possible divergences before they’ve occurred and handle them gracefully rather than just produce a runtime error and undefined behaviour.

Consequently, things like reading and parsing a file will often be more involved because success can never be guaranteed when the programme depends on an external state like the file system, and so the compiler demands that you either work with the cases of failure or at the very least explicitly ignore the risks by producing an error (hopefully with a useful message).

I for one am sick and tired of languages that force me to run my programmes and test for all possible edge cases just to find silly type inconsistencies, typos, bad assumptions or dangerous operations that are likely to fail sooner or later. So I’m quite partial to helpful type checkers and static safety guarantees.

Note that imperative vs functional is orthogonal to both purity and type safety. Rust is about as safe as Haskell but is predominantly imperative. Schemes like Clojure, Racket and Guile are about as safe as Python, but are decidedly functional while the latter is not. There are also pure functional languages that are untyped, like Nix (which simply doesn’t do any IO at all, at least directly).

Besides functional and imperative languages there are also logic programming languages like Prolog and Mercury. The former is an interpreted and rather unsafe language while the latter goes a long way to ensure that a programme is soundly typed and safe by introducing statically checked determinism, resource usage constraints (like only opening, using and closing a file once and in the right order - this is known as type linearity or uniqueness) and “modes” (which basically is: which function or predicate arguments can act as outputs from which inputs; allowing functions to act in reverse or predicate arguments can act as either inputs or outputs depending on which are known (“ground”) at that point, which is really cool).


This week, we see many contributions merged as we move towards the 0.9 release. @aweinstock gives a little insight into what modular weapons will look like. …

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I don’t know what I expected from this sub but I guess this should have been it




There was some work done on a plugin system, though I don’t know how powerful it will be (or how far off from being stable it is). In any case, the game is rather easily modified if you have some programming experience so modding could just be making a fork and hosting a server! I had no experience with Rust until I began contributing a few months back.




Maybe because the purpose of such communities isn’t outreach, but meant for people with something in common to exchange experiences, seek validation and find comfort, and/or solidarity. Something that might otherwise be lacking in their every day life. They might not wish to spend time and energy explaining these things to people who are different, which they may find themselves doing too much already.


The biggest blocker for me when it comes to self-hosting is the lack of a static IP (both internal and external)








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