Since last few years, there has been a lot of discussion ongoing about the latest incumbent candidate in the systemd family of services call...
@some_dude
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The only thing that is glitchy and problematic is this article. I know hating on systemd-* is in, but this is just bad:

  1. No it is not. The Arch wiki lists various storage options, LUKS is just one of them. You can use a plain directory if you want to. Also no part of systemd is currently ported to android and I don’t know anyone would be trying to change that.
  2. This is correct. There are workarounds but as Lenard himself said, systemd-home isn’t for everyone and this is indeed one drawback.
  3. Your home directory is still mounted to /home/some_dude.If some software can’t handle that your home directory is a mount point the software was already broken in the first pace.
  4. Yes both Arch linux and Ubuntu “include” systemd-homed, in the sens that they include the binary. Neither of them use it by default or help you configure it. You can use it if you want to but it isn’t some endorsed configuration in any way. If this counts as trying to ruin the stability of a system it seems to be a very unstable one.

urgh it is impossible to comment on the original post without a google account

@ksynwa
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For a dumdum non-systemd user, can you briefly describe what systemd-homed does?

@jwinnie
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It’s a replacement for UNIX users. Basically, instead of adding yourself to /etc/passwd, you create a file called /home/<username>.home. This file is an encrypted archive containing your home folder and a file called .identity that contains your group memberships and other user attributes.

The idea is that you can pick up your “home file” and plop it on any system with systemd-homed and it should work without further intervention. It also makes it incredibly easy to encrypt your home directory.

@some_dude
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I don’t use systemd-homd myself but I think the main idea was to have portable users and (optionally encrypted) home directories. systemd-homed users are stored in signed json files instead of /etc/passwd and if you move that file to another machine the user can log into the new machine as if they had an account their.

But as I said I don’t have any use for it personally so their might be more to it that I don’t know about

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