• fu@libranet.de
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    1 year ago

    @yogthos national sovereignty is. BS anyway. States are no friend of the working class. The turmoil will continue until we unite as a class against the bosses across imaginary lines used to control peope.

    • ☆ Yσɠƚԋσʂ ☆OP
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      1 year ago

      It’s not that simple in practice. While the worker movement must be international in nature, the mechanisms for organizing workers on a global scale effectively simply don’t exist at the moment. Meanwhile, US empire actively works to suppress and destroy worker movements. In this context, worker controlled states are the stepping stones towards liberation from capitalism.

  • poVoq@slrpnk.net
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    1 year ago

    I think you didn’t understand the title. Its about the UK and Brexit and how that has caused all sorts of supply issues UK side.

    • ☆ Yσɠƚԋσʂ ☆OP
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      1 year ago

      The title is pretty accurate actually, and the phrasing is deliberate. Nations that are part of EU are subjects to rules and regulations made by the EU bureaucracy. This body is not elected by the people of these nations nor can it be held to account by them. Any current member of the EU that wishes to pursue an economic policy that’s contrary to neoliberal capitalism that EU champions will find it impossible to do so because it lacks economic sovereignty required to do so.

      • Flavourful
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        1 year ago

        Have you heard of the EU parliament? The one that EU citizen vote for?

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            1 year ago

            Yes, it’s voted for by the parliament, which EU citizens vote for. Representative democracy. And can absolutely be held responsible by the people. The EU parliament can dissolve the comission if wanted.

            • ☆ Yσɠƚԋσʂ ☆OP
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              1 year ago

              The commission is not voted for, and most importantly there is no practical way for people of the individual countries to hold the commission accountable. EU parliament can dissolve the commission in theory, however claiming that there is some direct accountability happening is beyond absurd.

            • poVoq@slrpnk.net
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              1 year ago

              That is a bit misleading as the Comission is not directly voted for, but rather appointed by the head of states. But since all EU member states are democratic (with some reservations to Hungary these days), that is still more democratic than many similar economic coordination bodies.

      • poVoq@slrpnk.net
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        1 year ago

        The UK is not part of the EU any more. Under what rock have you been living?

        • ☆ Yσɠƚԋσʂ ☆OP
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          1 year ago

          I very clearly was not talking about UK in my comment, but rather explaining to you what national sovereignty is and how EU undermines it. Hope that helps clear things up for you.

          • poVoq@slrpnk.net
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            1 year ago

            Yes, but your original post shows a picture about the UK. I still think you are missing a lot of context (as usual for your “/c/europe” posts) and thus didn’t understand what this is about at all. The original picture is literally about how you can’t eat (post-Brexit) sovereignty and is a pro EU comment.

            • ☆ Yσɠƚԋσʂ ☆OP
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              1 year ago

              As the title of the post very clearly indicates, my point is regarding the framing used by the publication. I get the impression that you are intentionally failing to understand what I said in my post, and the follow up explanation. There were plenty of other framings that could have been used to describe post-Brexist problems that UK is having, but The New European chose to mock the concept of sovereignty. Again, hope this helps clear things up for you further. Please let me know if there is any other confusion on your end.

                • ☆ Yσɠƚԋσʂ ☆OP
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                  1 year ago

                  I love how you end every single discussion using ad hominem. What I actually wrote in black and white was this:

                  Any current member of the EU that wishes to pursue an economic policy that’s contrary to neoliberal capitalism that EU champions will find it impossible to do so because it lacks economic sovereignty required to do so.

                  This is obviously the case for actual socialist policies such as mass nationalization which would not be allowed under EU policies. This is precisely what Corbyn wanted to do if UK gained economic sovereignty. Thanks for once again clarifying that there is no difference between anarchists and liberals.