Note: I posted a better-formatted version of this document  here  as a PDF file.  Unfortunately there are some formatting glitches with Blog...
@Caronte
link
51Y

The proposal looks a lot like what KDE is to me. Some ideas I agree with, like the use of applications that work together in a UNIX way, but I don’t agree with the point that the UX/UI trends of 2010s have regressed the usability of the desktop. Flat design makes things a lot more recognizable and provides a clean workspace and workflow. Also, there is a thing that’s too many customizability. Users can feel burned by the amount of things you can customize, and the vast majority of them don’t even change their desktops from the default settings.

@clockwise_bit
link
31Y

I think the author has a great point and it’s shameful that only a handful of applications respect that philosophy.
The best example I can think of a program that for the most part follows the described approach is mpd (maybe even mopidy, haven’t used it yet though). It integrates so easily in applications, desktop environments, less known status bars, terminal interfaces… yet it’s not tightly-coupled, it just exposes and endpoint for commands.

While separating interface and application adds more work to the list of tasks an average joe has to accomplish, it has been proven to help a lot with the separation of concerns that in turns translates to tidier code and thus potentially less bugs in the program.

It’s true that it makes the programs a bit less efficient, but with the amount of raw calculation power we can harvest even from the smallest of computers, I’m honestly confused as to why we keep writing coupled UIs.

(Then of course there are exceptions, like games and other programs)

@jaex5Fox
banned
link
2
edit-2
1Y

deleted by creator

@Panzerfaust
creator
banned
link
11Y

Gnome 2.

@jaex5Fox
banned
link
3
edit-2
1Y

deleted by creator

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Linux is a family of open source Unix-like operating systems based on the Linux kernel, an operating system kernel first released on September 17, 1991 by Linus Torvalds. Linux is typically packaged in a Linux distribution (or distro for short).

Distributions include the Linux kernel and supporting system software and libraries, many of which are provided by the GNU Project. Many Linux distributions use the word “Linux” in their name, but the Free Software Foundation uses the name GNU/Linux to emphasize the importance of GNU software, causing some controversy.

Community icon by Alpár-Etele Méder, licensed under CC BY 3.0

  • 0 users online
  • 38 users / day
  • 65 users / week
  • 129 users / month
  • 427 users / 6 months
  • 3979 subscribers
  • 1298 Posts
  • 3837 Comments
  • Modlog