I just bought a new computer. I’ll install fedora silverblue. Do I just need to copy the home directory? And crontab. What else do I need to move?

  • bloodfart
    link
    fedilink
    arrow-up
    44
    ·
    1 month ago

    If you’re currently running a rpm distro, you can make it easier on yourself by using the duke nukem forever command to make a list of your installed programs: dnf list installed.

    Once that’s outputting an appropriate format, dump it into a text file with | oldprogs.txt.

    On your new computer, that same duke nukem forever command can be used to install from the list with something like dnf install << oldprogs.txt

    I bet you can come up with a way to stuff all that into a neat little one liner that’ll provide error handling, output teeing and everything else!

    • mat@linux.community
      link
      fedilink
      English
      arrow-up
      22
      ·
      1 month ago

      Thanks, I can’t think of it as anything but duke nukem forever now. Your comment made my day.

      • Tlaloc_Temporal@lemmy.ca
        link
        fedilink
        arrow-up
        2
        ·
        1 month ago

        It’s more appealing than the Did Not Finish command. That’s to thematically close to flaming crashes for my liking.

    • GravitySpoiledOP
      link
      fedilink
      English
      arrow-up
      6
      arrow-down
      2
      ·
      1 month ago

      Nice one.

      On silverblue, everything is installed within a distrobox. I should back that up and make sure it’s in my home folder.

      • boredsquirrel@slrpnk.net
        link
        fedilink
        arrow-up
        7
        ·
        1 month ago

        No not everything is installed in a Distrobox.

        • the core system contains base stuff
        • you can layer needed apps that need to be on the base system
        • GUI apps are preferred as Flatpaks
        • some random stuff may be in a Toolbox or Distrobox
        • you can use pip, cargo and others on the base OS to install binaries there.
  • Deckweiss@lemmy.world
    link
    fedilink
    arrow-up
    35
    arrow-down
    1
    ·
    edit-2
    1 month ago

    Nobody mentioned it yet, but my current no hassle solution is to:

    just physically move the nvme from one computer to the other

    • ikidd@lemmy.world
      link
      fedilink
      arrow-up
      10
      ·
      1 month ago

      That’s all I’ve done, or imaged it to a new drive. Linux is glorious for portability.

    • eldavi
      link
      fedilink
      arrow-up
      6
      ·
      1 month ago

      i’ve done this a couple times w sata and pata drives and it works; there’s lots to clean up to do, but it works.

  • yak@lmy.brx.io
    link
    fedilink
    English
    arrow-up
    12
    ·
    1 month ago

    Consider using tar to create an archive of your home directory, and then unpacking that on the new machine. This will help to capture all the links as well as regular files, and their permissions.

    Take a minute to think what else you have changed on the old machine, and then take another minute to think how tricky it would be to replicate on a new machine. Downloading the apps again is gloriously easy. Replacing configs, or keys and certificates, is not!

    I normally archive /etc as well, and then I can copy out the specific files I need.

    Did you install databases? You’ll want to follow specific instructions for those.

    Have you set up web sites? You’ll want to archive /var/www as well.

  • velox_vulnus
    link
    fedilink
    arrow-up
    12
    ·
    1 month ago

    That will preserve your files in home directory - however, it is not reproducible in the sense that you’ll have to install all apps manually.

    • GravitySpoiledOP
      link
      fedilink
      English
      arrow-up
      5
      arrow-down
      1
      ·
      1 month ago

      Thx.

      Meaning, backup a list of flatpak apps and reinstall them on the new machine

      • lemmyvore@feddit.nl
        link
        fedilink
        English
        arrow-up
        6
        ·
        1 month ago

        See if flatpak has some sort of export format that would let you install everything the same on the other machine. Some package managers have that.

  • Handles@leminal.space
    link
    fedilink
    English
    arrow-up
    6
    ·
    1 month ago

    I just made the move to another computer, using the same distro and DE setup as the old one. So far I managed by backing up ~/ and /usr/ so I could drop in system and programming settings.

    I don’t know how that will work if you’re going for a new distro but it’s always good to have your old configs for reference!

  • GustavoM@lemmy.world
    link
    fedilink
    English
    arrow-up
    7
    arrow-down
    2
    ·
    1 month ago

    tl;dr:

    dnf list installed > $anydir/meow
    

    On new computer, with fedora installed and the meow file;

    dnf install $(cat $anydir/meow)
    
    
    • boredsquirrel@slrpnk.net
      link
      fedilink
      arrow-up
      8
      ·
      1 month ago

      Well doesnt work on Silverblue but

      flatpak list --app
      

      If you have configured Flatpaks, you may want to copy the ~/.var/app/ directories.

  • Dariusmiles2123@sh.itjust.works
    link
    fedilink
    arrow-up
    1
    ·
    1 month ago

    I’m also thinking a lot about the best way to move everything from one computer to another if one day I buy a new computer.

    I thought I had found a way with Clonezilla, but after trying to clone my Surface Go 1 to an old laptop I had, it didn’t work. Could be because I hadn’t removed the surface specific kernel. But now I don’t feel safe anymore.

    Some people are suggesting to copy my home folder which I did, but I’m not sure it would fit my needs.

    Basically, my files are taken care of with cloud storage (kDrive by the way), but I’d like to keep the way all my programs and extensions are setup.

    So I ain’t sure I was a big help😅

    I hope one day we’ll just have some program to prepare an archive to unpack for your next system to make the transition seamlessly. Or just putting the computer side by side and sending everything wirelessly.

    I feel like we need this with all the personalization we can have on Linux.