hi all, i tried installing through apt and got an older 0.6.4 and i tried installing through an appimage but for some reason nvchad didnt accept it. also what is nerdfonts and is that the default for linux mint? been at this for an hour and am very confused

  • @hojjat
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    3 months ago

    I use bob. It’s a version manager for Neovim.

  • @PlexSheep@feddit.de
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    3 months ago

    I’m a heavy neovim user, also using Linux mint. I use the app image from the GitHub release page. Sure it means having it not automated, but that’s fine with me.

    Basically download the appimage, make it executable with chmod +x and move it to a location in your PATH, line ~/.local/bin/nvim (nvim being the name of the file, add that to your path. Another popular location might be /usr/local/bin/nvim). Afterwards, you can just use nvim in your terminal.

    • @jackpotOP
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      3 months ago

      does that work for flatpak and does nvchad work on the flatpak? can you test both to see if they work before you confirm cause yk how to do this stuff better than me. if nvchad doesnt work on flatpak, i’ll try this! also how do i add those directories to path and how do i use the chmod command. getting used to this apologies!

      • silly goose meekah
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        3 months ago

        chmod is a command line tool for changing permission and mode flags on a file. chmod +x modifies a file to be allowed to be executed. You can use it by typing chmod +x followed by a filename into your terminal.

        PATH usually refers to an environment variable that stores paths to common executable files. When you type a command into your terminal, Linux will search that environment variable to check if the program you want to execute is mentioned there. Adding nvim to that environment variable is like adding a shortcut to your terminal that allows you to call nvim, no matter what the current context of your terminal is, and without having to remember the full path of where nvim is stored. Here is a discussion about how to add something to your path variable.

        • @jackpotOP
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          3 months ago

          does this all work for flatpak variants? i dont have to use ch mod for that but can i add it to the path and then add nvchad?

          • silly goose meekah
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            3 months ago

            I am assuming you had a typo and mean NvChad (edit: just now realized you did mention NvChad in the title already). Yes you can, but calling flatpak applications on the command line is kinda weird so I would actually suggest an alias if you want to be able to just type nvim in your terminal.

            To start the flatpak version of neovim via the CLI you’ll need to type flatpak run io.neovim.nvim. Of course you don’t want to do that, so you can tell your terminal to remember that whenever you type nvim you actually meant flatpak run io.neovim.nvim. To do that you can put the following in your terminal: alias nvim='flatpak run io.neovim.nvim'

            As far as I understand, NvChad is a plugin for neovim. The command they provide for installing it just downloads the necessary files to the default config location for neovim, and starts neovim. however the flatpak version of neovim seems to be using a different location for it’s configuration. This blog post seems to say that the config location for flatpak neovim is ~/.var/app/io.neovim.nvim/config/nvim/, so you’ll probably have to move the files there for NvChad to work.

              • silly goose meekah
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                3 months ago

                I never used neovim so I’m not so familiar with the functionalities/terms. I was torn between writing plugin or config, but I thought a plugin would be more relevant. I’m assuming a plugin can change more than a config could.

              • @jackpotOP
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                13 months ago

                hi! have you foubd out if nvchad works on flatpak?

            • @jackpotOP
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              13 months ago

              i tried copying and pasting into the config file in the flatpak but it just ignored them and recreated thw original flatpak filws?

  • @BlanK0
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    33 months ago

    Try installing it with nix

      • @BlanK0
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        23 months ago

        This blog should help you with the installation and how to use, also if you need more in depth info there is this guide as well

    • @jackpotOP
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      23 months ago

      are ppas permanent? does my system scan for those addresses every update?

    • @jackpotOP
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      13 months ago

      what is nerdfonts and dies linux mimt have it

      • lemmyreader
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        23 months ago

        According to that article mentioned in my earlier comment you won’t need the nerdfonts.

    • @jackpotOP
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      3 months ago

      whats a ppa and why does it take so long for apt to update its stuff

      • lemmyreader
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        3 months ago

        Ubuntu uses LTS with five year support, which is why they like to keep a lot of software versions back. Linux Mint is based on Ubuntu I think. PPA is something you can add to Ubuntu or Ubuntu based Linux distributions to have newer or specific software repositories as extra on your system. Here’s a guide on PPA : https://itsfoss.com/ppa-guide/