• 28 Posts
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Joined 2 years ago
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Cake day: May 12th, 2022

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  • 4ffytoLinuxLinux and DOOM (1993)
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    5 days ago

    The reason that Doom is so portable goes beyond Linux and is an artefact of its development. id developed Doom on NeXTSTEP (i.e. Unix) machines and obviously targeted DOS. This is pretty unique among DOS games at the time and required id to write as much code as possible in a platform agnostic way. This means that the main engine does not care about where it is running and the usual DOS hacks are contained to DOS-specific files. In order to port Doom to a new platform, ideally one only needs to rewrite the system-specific implementation files for video, sound, filesystem access, etc., and this mostly holds true today. (These files are prefixed with i_ in the Doom source).

    The Linux port is just one of many versions developed at the time. I don’t believe that it was commercially released; it was more of a portability test. The reason that the Linux version was chosen for the source release over the DOS version was because it didn’t rely on the proprietary DMX sound library that the DOS port used.








  • I don’t think that’s a good idea. Pretty much all interaction with Emacs is mediated through keybinds. There is no distinction between shortcuts and fundamental behavior. Even ordinary typing is done by having each character on your keyboard bound to self-insert-command. Perhaps there is some way to nuke the global keymap, but then you’re left with literally nothing. Besides, this would not prevent various modes from adding their own keys anyway.

    You should consider whether Emacs keybinds are actually in the way enough to be bothersome. You can also keymap-global-unset (or keymap-unset) individual bindings that you find problematic. I’d also consider delving into the Spacemacs code to see how they implement their “vi only mode.”





  • 4ffytoLinuxTIL GNU/linux has 2 clipboards
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    8 months ago

    Emacs’s regular clipboard is the “kill ring” which also allows you to retrieve any previously cut/copied text. It also has “registers” where you can store and retrieve snippets of text, which can be considered clipboards when used for this purpose. Registers can be referenced by any character you can type on your keyboard, including control characters like ^D.

    This totals… a lot of clipboards.



  • 4ffytoLinuxDid we kill Linux's killer feature?
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    8 months ago

    I think that this is above all else the reason that I use Arch. Arch Linux makes creating packages trivial, basically just wrapping build instructions into a shell script template. Arch handles the rest. The build systems for deb or rpm packages don’t come close, and good luck rolling your own flatpak.

    This allows me to use pacman for everything outside of my home directory. Pacman is practically the central feature of my computer, and it’s wonderful. I’m sure those Nix people can relate, though I guess my method is a bit less robust.





  • 4ffyOPtoEmacsMastering Emacs - What's New in Emacs 29.1?
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    10 months ago

    I have done almost the opposite: moving as much configuration as I can into use-package statements, even for built-in features like dired. You can (use-package feature-name) or even (use-package emacs) in order to customize the basics. use-package just provides much better organization than any schema that I have ever been able to come up with on my own.






  • r/cth was originally a subreddit for the podcast Chapo Trap House, but it eventually bloomed into a general-purpose leftist space. IIRC, the sub was around 160k members at its peak and had a distinct posting culture.

    It was quarantined by Reddit for violent speech after calling for the death of slave owners and later banned for no particular reason at the same time as r/the_donald, presumably as a “both sides” sort of thing.


  • Hexbear is an instance formed mostly by former r/chapotraphouse users after that sub was banned from Reddit a few years ago. Hexbear used to run on a custom fork of Lemmy so that the community could add extra features that they wanted (like custom emoji) but it was recently ported back to mainline Lemmy after merging or reimplementing as many changes as possible.

    Currently, Hexbear does not have federation enabled, and there is discussion about who to federate with or even whether to federate at all. The community is very active and self-sufficient and some members prefer the isolation.

    Content-wise, it’s a leftist-focused instance. Some shitposts, some serious posts, and a lot of inside jokes.


  • 4ffytoLinuxNon-Tiling Window Manager Users?
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    11 months ago

    The sfwbar screenshots did not appeal to me, so I never tried it out. If it’s sufficiently customizeable then it’s worth a shot, I guess.

    One of the big issues that I have with all the Wayland panels is that they seem designed for tiling compositors like Sway. More like status bars than task bars. The Windows-style list of open programs is not really necessary for a tiling workflow and this is painfully reflected in the available options. I have bashed Waybar into a decent facsimile of my tint2 config visually, but the actual window list module is just awful.


  • 4ffytoLinuxIRC Clients
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    11 months ago

    When I feel the need to visit an IRC community, I generally use ERC, which is built into Emacs. Out of the box, it provides a really pleasant minimal IRC experience. Of course, much like anything in Emacs, it can be extended to your heart’s content.

    Emacs also comes with another client called rcirc, because Emacs apparently needs to ship with two builtin IRC clients? I haven’t used that one much.


  • 4ffytoLinuxNon-Tiling Window Manager Users?
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    11 months ago

    I am a proud Openbox user. In the stacking realm, there is nothing quite like Openbox’s customizeability and the great tooling that surrounds it. In particular, opensnap gives me window snapping to the edge of the screen with the mouse, which is sorely missing from most light window managers. Openbox also has really powerful hotkeys (any arbitrary sequence of actions) alongside Emacs-style key chords, which makes it difficult to port my setup to any other environment.

    One day, I hope to migrate to labwc, which seems to be carrying Openbox’s banner into the Wayland era. Unfortunately, labwc doesn’t (and probably never will) support key chords and I have not been able to find a suitable replacement for tint2, which I use as my taskbar. Someday…

    Here is an old screenshot of mine. Nothing has changed since then.







  • 4ffytoLinuxWayland pros and cons?
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    11 months ago

    bspwm is probably my favorite general-purpose tiling window manager. I have not personally tried this out yet, but River is superficially similar, with the main configuration done through a combination of shell scripting and riverctl commands. I’m not sure how the tiling behaves in comparison though.


  • 4ffytoLinuxWayland pros and cons?
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    11 months ago

    This is something that I am sure will be solved eventually, but one of the major weaknesses of Wayland is the lack of lightweight standalone compositors.

    For example, if I want a lightweight stacking window manager on X, I can choose between Openbox, Fluxbox, FVWM, IceWM, Pekwm, JWM, Window Maker, hell even twm if I were a masochist. I have tried out all of these at one point or another and they all have something to offer users. But using Wayland, there’s, uhh, labwc, and that’s it? Maybe I could try using kwin standalone?

    The situation for tiling window managers is similar, with Sway being the only one that feels mature.

    I plan on migrating from Openbox to labwc at some point in the future, once it’s ready. labwc itself is really good, but some of the other programs I need to recreate my setup aren’t there yet. Someday…