Called isochoric freezing, the technique relies on storing foods in a sealed, rigid container made of hard plastic or metal that is filled with a liquid such as water, and placing it in a freezer. Conventional freezing involves exposing food to the air and freezing it solid at sub-zero temperatures, the new method does not turn food into solid ice.

@roastpotatothief
link
31M

Instead, only about 10% of the volume of water in the container is frozen, and the pressure inside the chamber keeps the ice from continually expanding.

that’s a very good idea. you just need a simple way to open the box without it instantly freezing. maybe a kind of latch that will only open when it’s warmed up and the pressure has returned to normal.

@Thann
creator
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11M

I think it will take a lot of energy to make / maintain the boxes, so it would be interesting to know where the “break even” point is

@roastpotatothief
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11M

You are cooling the food under high pressure without actually freezing it. But does this actually preserve food?!

@Thann
creator
link
21M

lower temps slow the metabolism of microbes

@roastpotatothief
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11M

probably not as much as freezing them though. the inventors should quantify that, how much less effective it is than freezing.

and tbh the modern way is just irradiate everything. they don’t boil surgical tools anymore. they use a special microwave. what would the benefits/logistics be in making a consumer version of that?

@murky
link
11M

Sounds promising… and thanks to global warming, thawing shouldn’t take too long either

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