• ZagamTheVile@lemmy.world
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    9 months ago

    It’s a good Scrabble word. It’s the sound you make when you get your sexual organs trapped in something.

  • netburnr@lemmy.world
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    9 months ago

    I just want to note, that is a Hella old Mac laptop, this picture likely has children in college.

  • Bob@feddit.nl
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    9 months ago

    I’d never make a joke like this, not because it’s disrespectful or whatever, but because I’d just be outing myself as bad at reading.

  • PolandIsAStateOfMind
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    9 months ago

    It is a real word btw, patronymic meaning “Son of Andrew” turned into surname.

    • riodoro1@lemmy.world
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      9 months ago

      Written in latin alphabet.

      We’re doing fine here in poland, thanks for your concern.

    • TimeNaan@lemmy.world
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      9 months ago

      He’s got a point. In cyrillic rhis could be written much shorter, for example “rz” would be replaced by “ж” and “cz” by “ч”.

      Cyrillic is better adapted to slavic languages than latin.

      • Vitaly@feddit.uk
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        9 months ago

        yes, for cyrillic alphabet it is a lot more authentic for slavic languages

      • ornery_chemist@mander.xyz
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        9 months ago

        I think rz is linguistically equivalent to a soft r, so in this case rze would be “ре”, not “ж”. In some areas, rz is pronounced closer to the Czech ř. IIRC, ж transliterates to ż (not to be confused with ź, which is a soft z). The Polish Roman alphabet is very regular and well adapted to the language, representing palatalization and other non-Latin sounds as digraphs in a similar way to Italian or English.

        The cyrillicization of Polish was historically done to a limited extent, but carried with it some, shall we say, sociopolitical baggage. There are also some peculiarities to Polish that either don’t exist or have ambiguous transliterations into Cyrillic, such as the Polish nasals ą and ę or ó (historically a long o, but currenly pronouned /u/).