• zeppo@lemmy.world
    link
    fedilink
    English
    arrow-up
    74
    ·
    8 months ago

    Not really? The format is well documented. Whether it is possible to include some sort of exploit depends on the client you use to play it, and if so, I doubt Microsoft or IBM would be the ones to do it.

        • Edgelord_Of_Tomorrow@lemmy.world
          link
          fedilink
          arrow-up
          12
          arrow-down
          1
          ·
          8 months ago

          I bought one of their phones after how much people rave about them. Cost me more than the equivalent Samsung or iPhone. It was a piece of shit with a shockingly mediocre camera considering Sony make the fucking sensor. Only good thing about it was the power button thumbprint scanner and even that’s a monkey’s paw feature because Sony having the patent is stopping anyone else doing it.

          • Jesus_666@feddit.de
            link
            fedilink
            arrow-up
            8
            ·
            8 months ago

            Meanwhile I think mine is a pretty good phone except for the side-facing fingerprint sensor, which is straight up incorrect and shouldn’t be done.

            Then again I consider an audio jack to be an important feature and smartphone cameras as something you can safely skip in the feature matrix. My needs are somewhat unusual.

            The fingerprint sensor is still bad, though. It’s extremely easy to accidentally touch it three times while fishing the phone out of your pocket. It should require a second of contact before trying to unlock the phone; that would make it vastly more usable.

            • Rin@lemm.ee
              link
              fedilink
              arrow-up
              3
              ·
              8 months ago

              I think your needs are more common than you think, considering i have the same needs as you.

              So, there’s a fingerprint setting i had to turn on since i had the same issue as you. you have to press the power button then tap the sensor to unlock it. It’s called “Press to unlock with fingerprint” inside the security settings.

  • meteokr@community.adiquaints.moe
    link
    fedilink
    arrow-up
    43
    arrow-down
    1
    ·
    8 months ago

    While the format is proprietary, the actual decoding and encoding processes can be open source. Like how a box can be locked, but everyone has the keys to open it and see what’s inside.

    • woelkchen@lemmy.world
      link
      fedilink
      arrow-up
      20
      arrow-down
      1
      ·
      edit-2
      8 months ago

      What’s proprietary about a format older than 25 years, meaning all possible patents have elapsed?

      • meteokr@community.adiquaints.moe
        link
        fedilink
        arrow-up
        21
        ·
        8 months ago

        Proprietary is independent of patents. Different systems. There already exists open licensed, but patent encumbered formats or their inverse. WAV is proprietary, but again, is fully documented and there exists open licensed encoders and decoders.

        I have no idea why it still remains proprietary, but its an old format, and IBM/MS probably just don’t really care about it since it’s last update was over a decade ago.

          • Rustmilian@lemmy.world
            link
            fedilink
            arrow-up
            13
            ·
            8 months ago

            The licensing of the format/it’s original implementation. Like how an emulator can be open source and FOSS licensed and be able to run proprietary games.

            • duncesplayed@lemmy.one
              link
              fedilink
              English
              arrow-up
              9
              arrow-down
              1
              ·
              8 months ago

              The WAV format never had a licence. It was a trade secret (a rather half-assed one, but whatever).

              To be a “proprietary”, a file format needs to either be secret (in part or in whole) or require a licence. WAV satisfies neither of those criteria. It is not proprietary.

              It would be fair to say that it was proprietary up until it was reverse engineered, but that doesn’t apply today. Every part of it is completely specified, openly and without any licensing or legal restrictions. It’s an open format.

              • meteokr@community.adiquaints.moe
                link
                fedilink
                arrow-up
                3
                ·
                8 months ago

                The WAV format never had a licence.

                By default that means that, depending on your jurisdiction, it is very likely proprietary. No license mean it does not impart any rights to you. Some places do have a “by default this is owned by the public domain”, but I don’t think that’s a standard.

                To be a “proprietary”, a file format needs to either be secret (in part or in whole) or require a licence. WAV satisfies neither of those criteria. It is not proprietary.

                The WAV format itself is owned and was developed by IBM/MS. I don’t know where you live, but that is wildly incorrect on how copyright law works in most places. By default, the creator owns the product and all rights to its use. Then they may choose to allow others to use it within a license or other agreement. In this case, IBM/MS allows anyone to use the file format, but it is within their rights to also disallow this at any time. Here you can see for yourself, it is a proprietary format. Something not being proprietary is an exception, you have to explicitly make something that way. For example Ogg Vorbis is open source, open licensed and patent free.

                It would be fair to say that it was proprietary up until it was reverse engineered…

                Being reverse engineered absolutely does not invalidate the proprietary ownership of a product. Compare this to the Ocarina of Time decompilation project; just because the game has been fully reverse engineered, does that mean that Nintendo does not still own the game and all rights to it?

        • kalleboo@lemmy.world
          link
          fedilink
          arrow-up
          3
          ·
          8 months ago

          It’s such a Microsoft/IBM format. “Let’s use this structural wrapper format! And then just define a format inside one gigantic chunk inside it!”

          When Apple had already created AIFF years before and actually used the structure of the wrapper to implement the metadata. And also adopted an open structural format that already existed on Amiga.

  • zwekihoyy
    link
    fedilink
    arrow-up
    13
    ·
    8 months ago

    I’m curious what would even be “snuck into it” ?