• calabast@lemm.ee
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    24 days ago

    I’m gonna guess the original version of this joke said “crashed” instead of “fell over”, cause then it would actually be ambiguous enough for the premise to work.

          • Chronographs@lemmy.zip
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            24 days ago

            “Failed over” does, I’ve never heard fell over mean anything but what’s described in the picture.

            • Ephera
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              23 days ago

              I have heard it before, albeit tongue-in-cheek. So, like the server can be “running”, it can also trip and fall over.

          • bamboo@lemm.ee
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            24 days ago

            I use it to describe a variety of things, but usually it’s related to servers not being able to handle load rather than an outright crash, but I’m not strict about it. Laos balancer failures could be it, could also just be that something was really I efficient but wasn’t noticed until it went into production.

          • Revan343@lemmy.ca
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            23 days ago

            Some bands of old-time hackers figured out how to induce disk-accessing patterns that would do this to particular drive models and held disk-drive races.

            I love the Jargon File

      • Mouselemming@sh.itjust.works
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        24 days ago

        That’s probably fallout from the early days of this joke. After seeing this image with ‘the server crashed’, funny programmers would start saying their server “fell over” to reference that memory. Now it’s come full circle. Meanwhile those of us who are “grandma peering at the computer screen” would only say a computer has “crashed.” And wouldn’t know how to fix it beyond a couple of tries at turning it off and back on again. (Which usually does work, though!)

    • Bezier@suppo.fi
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      23 days ago

      Or a different language. To me, they’re the same word, so this pun would actually work properly.

    • GrundlButter@lemmy.dbzer0.com
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      23 days ago

      If the inertia didn’t physically damage more than half of those drives, I would be surprised. I don’t think redundancy is a factor in this scenario. This has 3 likely outcomea. Restore from local backup in a different rack, restore from cloud/offsite backup, or the whole company needs to update their resumes.

  • MrAlternateTape@lemm.ee
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    22 days ago

    Much like the classic.

    “Boss, I damaged the mirror of the car and now I can’t make it in time.”

    “Why not? It’s just a mirror.”

    “The rest of the car is on top of it.”

    • JackGreenEarth@lemm.ee
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      22 days ago

      Just to be clear, in seriousness, if even just your mirror is broken, it’s not safe to drive, as you can’t see the traffic behind you.