• @LemmyKnowsBest@lemmy.world
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    1533 months ago

    a boring dystopia

    late stage capitalism

    Anyway poor people don’t buy Kellogg’s, it’s overpriced. Poor people buy the generic cereals that come in those huge plastic ziplock resealable bags. Not only do they cost less but they have more intelligent useful packaging and the quality is fine too.

  • @naevaTheRat@lemmy.dbzer0.com
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    1003 months ago

    Don’t do this, you’ll be malnourished. Grains aren’t a particularly good food group.

    Potatoes don’t require much prep, are generally cheap and filling, and will be much better nutrient wise. I’d still recommend rice and beans though. Canned beans work if you have no means to cook.

    • @Infynis@midwest.social
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      433 months ago

      I seem to remember there being issues historically with poor people relying on potatoes as their food source

    • @hex_m_hell@slrpnk.net
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      273 months ago

      Potatoes are also really easy to grow. If you ever forget about your potatoes and they sprout or you leave them in the sun and they get green, you can put them in a pot and grow fresh potatoes.

      Fava beans are also extremely easy to grow.

        • @hex_m_hell@slrpnk.net
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          33 months ago

          Potatoes grow well in shade. Fava beans can grow in containers just fine, but may need a balcony. I would also get a short variety. A lot of things can grow in a window sill.

          There’s also guerilla gardening, where you plant on an abandoned plot. Potatoes are great for this because they’ll basically grow on their own as long as they aren’t overtaken by blackberries.

    • @Chriswild@lemmy.world
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      193 months ago

      Beans are cheaper dry than canned though. If you have the patience you can start them in a slow cooker before you go to work.

      Garlic, onion, and peppers go miles in making beans taste good while also being cheaper.

      • I’m wondering now though whether the cost balances out because dry beans require a lot more energy to cook? I know they need at least an hour on the stove, whereas canned beans you can just add to a chilli etc straight away

        • lad
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          103 months ago

          Most likely, dry ones would still turn out cheaper because they weigh much more after hydration. But this is indeed a matter to consider

        • @Tessellecta@feddit.nl
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          63 months ago

          This can also be mitigated a lot by cooking the beans in the morning mor a short time, packing the pan into a lot of blankets and then cooking it shortly in the evening.

            • @paholg@lemm.ee
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              53 months ago

              How poor are we talking? I just found a pressure cooker for $25 on Amazon.

              • @Croquette@sh.itjust.works
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                33 months ago

                Poor where we are talking about saving cents on buying canned beans vs dry beans because it makes a difference.

                When you go in debt every month to just survive, every cent count.

                I would definitely indebt myself of 25$, but I am in a situation where I don’t need to, so it is easy to say. I don’t know what that reality is.

              • @Croquette@sh.itjust.works
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                13 months ago

                I am not aware of the second hand market where you are, but it’s hard to find deals here and if you find one, you gotta be fast.

                But that’s a fair point. It depends on where you are I guess.

      • @lefaucet@slrpnk.net
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        23 months ago

        I think time to cook food has become a luxry in the eyes of the so-called “invisible hand”. It’d be rad to find someone in the community with the time to cook huge pots of the stuff and pay them for the rice 'n beans.

        Cereal is expensive, people arent buying it because its cheap, theyre buying it because the invisible hand demands their cooking time.

    • @ris@feddit.de
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      53 months ago

      Rice often contains too much heavy mettals. Canned food contains too much BPA.

    • @rumschlumpel@lemmy.blahaj.zone
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      3 months ago

      Potatoes don’t require much prep

      You have to peel and cook them, though. That’s a pretty big hurdle for people who would consider regularly eating cereal for dinner.

      I do like instant mashed potatos, though, and they’re fairly cheap.

      • @naevaTheRat@lemmy.dbzer0.com
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        3 months ago

        I’m talking people on survival mode, as I mentioned at the end of my very short comment just eat canned beans from the tin with no facilities to cook. Also you don’t need to peel potatoes, you can microwave them also, or bury in a fire if you don’t have electricity and are using one for heat.

        Cereal is a scam, it’s expensive and nutritionally pointless.

  • DessertStorms
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    953 months ago

    A lot of people here are missing the fact that cereal doesn’t require any additional cost, time, and/or effort to store and prepare (in a desperate situation you might even have it with water or dry if you can’t access milk).

    So while rice or potatoes might be a better meal, and the ingredients cheaper to buy (but not when you factor in cost and time of cooking), they may still not be an option for some.

    For those who have never really been it - it’d blow your mind how expensive it is to be poor in so many different ways (a feature of capitalism, of course, not a bug).

    • @FakeGreekGirl@lemmy.blahaj.zoneOP
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      373 months ago

      Yeah, that is an excellent point. The time to actually prepare rice and beans comes at a premium when you’re working multiple jobs to make ends meet.

      • DessertStorms
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        173 months ago

        Right, that’s why fast food is thriving despite everyone knowing what shit it is - it fills a hole fast and cheap enough, and you’re not using any of your own energy - physically from the utility, but also physically, and mentally, from yourself to prepare it (and before that you have to refrigerate ingredients or keep them frozen so you have to own and pay to run a fridge/freezer as well as an oven or toaster or hob, and before that you have to shop for ingredients, it all takes money, time, and energy of every kind).

        The problem isn’t how people go about trying to survive (like eating cereal for dinner), it’s the people making billions off of the industries and institutions that require workers be in such a desperate state in the first place.

      • @Asafum@feddit.nl
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        73 months ago

        I don’t want to sound unsympathetic, but rice takes 15-20 mins in the microwave (if done right it’s perfectly fine) so it’s just seconds of button pressing and then walk away to do whatever else you need to and I buy canned beans that are already cooked so all you need to do is reheat them.

        The hardest part for some is learning not to hate eating leftovers. I never had this issue so it comes easier to me, but my easy weekly meal (it’s just me so it’s simpler) is canned vegetables, canned beans, and a chicken breast all the the slow cooker with some basic seasoning. I can add whatever I want afterwards to change the flavors so it’s not always the “same.” I really don’t spend any time over an oven unless I want to.

        All that said I imagine this gets 100000x harder when kids are involved, but luckily for me I’m pretty much the least desirable man on earth so I don’t need to worry about procreation lol

          • @Asafum@feddit.nl
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            23 months ago

            I just do it once a week and make a bunch, but if you’re working 2 jobs 7 days a week then yeah just about anything is too much :(

            • @zod000
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              3 months ago

              I’ve been there and it almost killed me. It wasn’t money that got me (that much), but the lack of time and sleep. I’d live by vending machine junk and naps in the car between jobs.

      • @Holzkohlen@feddit.de
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        23 months ago

        Beans from a can, champignons from a glass, bit of corn from a can. Put it on a tortilla with a bit of salsa for flavor. I add some flax seeds cause they are supposed to be good for your intestinal health. Obviously this tastes better when you take some time to prepare it in a pan, but it’s cheap, very filling and takes a few minutes to prepare at most. I like to eat it cold on hot summer days.

    • @VieuxQueb@lemmy.ca
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      243 months ago

      Yeah I know!

      Not enough money to pay your bill it will cost you 75-90$ for being broke.

      You buy small portions cause you can’t afford bulk, it will cost you more in small portions.

      You are alone ! No family rebate for you. You can’t buy a home, well rent will cost you more than a mortgage.

      Etc…

    • @paholg@lemm.ee
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      143 months ago

      You can get a rice cooker for $20. Then, you can make rice and beans (with beans from a can) with virtually no effort.

      You can also go from there if you have more time/money. Add cheese, hot sauce, salsa, avocado, make tacos, etc.

      But I’ve survived many a meal with just rice from a rice cooker and a can of beans, and it’s far more nutritious and has left me feeling far better than eating cereal would.

      • DessertStorms
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        3 months ago

        You can get a rice cooker for $20

        If you need $20 dollars spare as the first step, and to continue to use electricity to power the thing as the second - it isn’t accessible. Also - did it even cross your mind that if they could afford it, they would get one? It’s not like rice cookers are this secret tool only a select few know about…

        Seriously, I get that it can be hard to imagine conditions we haven’t personally experienced, but it can’t be that hard to understand what “dirt poor” actually means, nor to accept that poor people aren’t poor by choice, nor are they surviving on cereals because they have better options they’re just not utilising as well as you think you would in their shoes, which you are not, and clearly have never been, in.

        • @Crazypartypony@lemmy.world
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          123 months ago

          A box of cereal is like $6 and all sugar. It will provide 3-4 bowls of cereal for that price, with no actual nutrition. If you can afford a box of cereal a day, you can live on instant noodles instead for like 3 days and have the 20 for a brand new rice cooker. Or just go to the thrift store.

          Cereal is not a poor person food. It is not nutritious, cheap, or filling. It is an expensive box of sugar. I get that it can be hard to imagine conditions we haven’t personally experienced, but it can’t be THAT hard to do basic math and put yourself in that situation for one second to understand that eating cereal for every meal is not cheap or sustainable.

            • @naevaTheRat@lemmy.dbzer0.com
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              63 months ago

              nah I’ve been eating from bins poor and you can also just eat beans from the can cold. I’m not saying you’ll love life but you can survive around a year before serious deficiencies and it’s much much much cheaper per calorie than cereal.

              Importantly it also has proteins so you can actually keep working/moving around etc. You can basically only sell your body (begging, stealing, sex work, or labor) at that point so you need it to work.

              Rice is bulk and calories but stale bread from supermarket bins is free and can be eaten cold. Steal bolt cutters from the back of a car at a job site and you’re golden for getting into supermarket bins.

              • I didn’t even grow to that poor, but knew people who ate worse just because the battle of everyday life took every last ounce of gumption they had.

                Luckily my ma knew about food and cooking, so we did alright, but I had a lot of little friends who were totally totally lost when it came to feeding themselves.

                Hell right now I know middle aged men pulling six figures who are hurting nutritionally, and it’s like impossible to educate them to a better way to take care of themselves, despite money not actually being an issue

                • @naevaTheRat@lemmy.dbzer0.com
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                  33 months ago

                  Yeah, I guess I was lucky in some ways because my family coming from Polish invasion survivors meant that I was raised with a strong emphasis on healthy peasant food. My grandparents in particularly always made sure we ate heartily, so when I was on my own for a bit and had to survive I knew that I needed crap like veggie stews and not instant noodles.

                  When I went to uni it was baffling sneaking in to the student accomodation to visit my girlfriend and seeing rich kids with literal fucking scurvy and shopping carts full of pasta and mince + instant noodles. Like friends, please eat a carrot.

        • @paholg@lemm.ee
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          3 months ago

          Thanks for assuming a ton there, asshole.

          I have been there. I have scraped together coins I could find to buy a single pound of dry pasta, to eat it plain. Repeatedly.

          Money is not such an issue for me these days, but depression is. I know how hard it can be to do the minimal steps to make food.

          I understand how precious time, money, and energy can be. I have eaten cereal and the like for plenty of meals I shouldn’t have, and have always regretted it.

          There are better options.

          A $20 rice cooker is the same as like 5 boxes of cereal. If you are too money pressed, but have some time, one can likely be found nearly free at a thrift store or yard sale, or you can cook rice or pasta in a pot instead.

          If you don’t have access to a cooking surface, we’re getting to houselessness territory, which is a huge problem and is affecting far too many people, but is beyond just being poor or not having time.

          Edit: And if all that is too much, you can eat cold beans from a can. I have done this as well. It’s not great, but it’s a better option than cereal still.

          • I’m happy that no matter how bad things were for you that you had the wherewithal to feed yourself properly. It doesn’t sound like you’ve experienced a lot of privilege, but that is one area where you can count yourself fortunate.

            Similarly, I’ve been homeless but I always made sure that I could get some food into me somewhere. Usually shelters, soup kitchens, food banks

        • @fidodo@lemmy.world
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          43 months ago

          That’s $20 brand new. If you get it used you can find some either for free or next to nothing. I don’t think it’s a cost thing, I think it’s an accessibility thing.

          Also, Kellogg isn’t a budget cereal brand. If you’re so poor you can’t afford a few dollars for a ride cooker then you shouldn’t be buying Kellogg. Actually, nobody should be buying Kellogg because it’s all the same cereal except for marketing.

      • @Riven@lemmy.dbzer0.com
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        23 months ago

        Mine was a slow cooker with lentils and I would just refill as needed. Lentils, salt, pepper, tomatoes, onions, garlic, cilantro and if I’m feeling fancy/rich cook up some bacon to chuck in there. Minus the bacon it took like 5 minutes to chuck everything in there and leave it to cook. This was my poor college days where I just rented a room and had a part time job. Shit sucked.

    • @barsoap@lemm.ee
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      103 months ago

      It’s also depression food. If you don’t find the energy to make one simple warm meal a day, and that can be as simple as melted cheese or pancakes or an omelette, you don’t have a time problem you have a psychological problem.

  • @schnokobaer
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    513 months ago

    for cash-strapped families

    Is Kellogg’s cereal even cheap at all?? I’m not in the US so I could only imagine but I’d guess it’s not, is it?

  • Blackout
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    473 months ago

    People are broke and broken. They don’t care anymore and settle for sugar frosted cardboard for dinner. This guy is up there smiling and thinking “all this misery is great for business!”

      • @frostysauce@lemmy.world
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        53 months ago

        They would be even more expensive than cereal because they would upcharge for the convenience of not having to pour cereal into a bowl.

  • @uriel238@lemmy.blahaj.zone
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    3 months ago

    I can count my lucky stars my income level never dipped below the rice-and-beans povery level, but it has dipped below cereal made by Kellogs and General Mills. They’re a false product like Nestlē baby formula as sold in Africa. They are expensive by the ounce and poor nutrition.

    But if you are that dirt poor and have a 60 hour job then you may not have the time or energy to make rice. You’re also stuck in bonded servitude. That is a profound level of fucked.

    Pilnick is celebrating selling desperation food at inflated prices to slaves.

    • @dejected_warp_core@lemmy.world
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      I’m right there with you. Beans, rice, potatoes, and the occasional pasta dish. Whatever vegetables were inexpensive, and whatever meat was on manager’s special or BOGO. I did eventually figure out that inexpensive tofu could be purchased in bulk at some asian grocery stores, but by then I was on my way off the struggle diet.

      At one point, it was clear that stuff like “hamburger helper” was too expensive, and going after raw seasoning ingredients and pasta was going to save a substantial part of the shopping bill. Boxed cereal was also out of the question.

      Edit: energy costs (electricity) were bundled into my rent at the time. I don’t even want to think about how to navigate that situation by paying for butane, propane, or natural gas on top of everything else.

    • @TimewornTraveler@lemm.ee
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      3 months ago

      I ain’t playing. too many morons. I don’t want a bunch of fucking morons deciding how the next constitution looks. now if it was just you and me messing with it? meh we’d probably fuck up tooooo, my lil portabello

  • @BlueLineBae@midwest.social
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    333 months ago

    I really don’t get this. Cereal is very expensive right now, at least here in the Midwest it is. I’ve seen small boxes upwards of $9. I’ll admit that I don’t eat cereal all that much these days, but I like it occasionally and when I went to pickup my favorite box, I decided it wasn’t worth it. What cash strapped family is eating boxes of cereal for dinner when they could be eating much cheaper and filling foods like beans and rice? Heck, a case of ramen noodles is cheaper than cereal. Or maybe my area is the expensive cereal zone 🤷

    • @Taniwha420@lemmy.world
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      193 months ago

      That was my first response: who has the money for cereal in this economy? I tell you what, Mr. Kellogg, if it’s breakfast for dinner it’s going to be toast or porridge. I’m certainly not overpaying for glorified dried, smashed frozen corn.

      • @Grilipper54@sh.itjust.works
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        63 months ago

        I would guess it’s not necessarily poor people buying it but for people that were eating fast food/takeout and now the prices are too high to keep up that lifestyle. If you’re lazy than cereal is a great go to and still cheaper then fastfood. If you’re actually poor and lazy, you aren’t buying kellogs unless you have poor money management skills. I know I’m not buying any kellogs brand, I haven’t in probably 5 years.

        This news segment was frustrating though, the man shows no sympathy and only talks about making a bigger profit off of the situation.

        • @Holzkohlen@feddit.de
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          13 months ago

          If you’re lazy than cereal is a great go to

          It really isn’t. At least have some muesli instead. Cereal is just sugary junk food.

          • Kellogg’s Original (and most offbrand versions of it) doesn’t actually contain much sugar, it’s mostly just straight corn, salt and malt. Oatmeal is still better, but a lot of people find it less tasty.

    • @gyrfalcon@beehaw.org
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      83 months ago

      This is the second post about crazy expensive cereal today and I’m debating arbitraging cereal near me cuz I’m paying like $1.70 for a 14 ounce box of store brand Cheerios

    • @FakeGreekGirl@lemmy.blahaj.zoneOP
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      73 months ago

      Where I am, the big cereal brands (Kelloggs, Post, General Mills) tend to go for $6-7 a box, and the bargain brands are like half that at most. I agree, rice and beans would work better if you were being frugal. Or eggs; eggs were real expensive for a bit, but they’re back down to $2 a dozen.

    • @Cypher@lemmy.world
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      23 months ago

      What kind of cereals are you looking at?

      I buy oats (for porridge) and wheatbix and they’re less than half the price of any of the sugar overloaded cereals.

  • Bigfoot
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    283 months ago

    In what country is Kellog’s cereal affordable to cash strapped families

  • @jaschen@lemm.ee
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    263 months ago

    I remembered being poor early in my life and eating cereal with water. Reading this shit makes me hate this man even more than I thought I could.

  • @DragonAce@lemmy.world
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    3 months ago

    The thing that everyone ITT seems to be forgetting is that while yes making rice or beans or something similar can be cheap and also very filling. When someone is working 40+ hours a week at multiple jobs to keep a roof over their heads, depression is inevitable. Living paycheck to paycheck is stressful, anxiety inducing, and depressing. So when someone is exhausted and depressed, sometimes all they have the energy for is to pour a bowl of cereal, because anything beyond that is just too much.

    • @Got_Bent@lemmy.world
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      63 months ago

      I’m more or less in the situation you describe, but I don’t find rice and beans to be particularly stressful.

      Part of that is that I do cheat with canned beans instead of making them from dry.

      But rice is pretty much get home, start rice, go pee, get out of work clothes, curse my existence, and boom, rice is done.

      I’m not in the financial situation you describe. I can afford better food. But better food does take effort that I don’t want to put in after twelve to fourteen hour days. I’m way too tired to be bothered with chopping and prepping. In slower times of the year, I’ll do that in Sunday for the whole week, but in these busier times, I can’t even get to that.

  • @muelltonne@feddit.de
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    193 months ago

    Yes, cereal is bad. Yes, it’s expensive. Yes, it’s unhealthy. But what many people here are forgetting: There is a whole industry advertising cereal as a healthy breakfast (and now apparently dinner). You go into a supermarket and it is full of colourful boxes telling you what an awesome meal cereal is. Potatoes don’t have that. There is no TV ad for potatoes. And yes, cereal tastes great, because of the sugar.