I installed a few different distros, landed on Cinnamon Mint. I’m not a tech dummy, but I feel I’m in over my head.

I installed Docker in the terminal (two things I’m not familiar with) but I can’t find it anywhere. Googled some stuff, tried to run stuff, and… I dunno.

I’m TRYING to learn docker so I can set up audiobookshelf and Sonarr with Sabnzbd.

Once it’s installed in the terminal, how the hell do I find docker so I can start playing with it?

Is there a Linux for people who are deeply entrenched in how Windows works? I’m not above googling command lines that I can copy and paste but I’ve spent HOURS trying to figure this out and have gotten no where…

Thanks! Sorry if this is the wrong place for this

EDIT : holy moly. I posted this and went to bed. Didn’t quite realize the hornets nest I was going to kick. THANK YOU to everyone who has and is about to comment. It tells you how much traction I usually get because I usually answer every response on lemmy and the former. For this one I don’t think I’ll be able to do it.

I’ve got a few little ones so time to sit and work on this is tough (thus 5h last night after they were in bed) but I’m going to start picking at all your suggestions (and anyone else who contributes as well)

Thank you so much everyone! I think windows has taught me to be very visually reliant and yelling into the abyss that is the terminal is a whole different beast - but I’m willing to give it a go!

  • Arthur BesseMA
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    22 months ago

    You main OS is called the host and the container is called the guest

    The word “guest” is generally used for virtual machines, not containers.

    • yianiris
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      22 months ago

      Can containers boot on their own? Then they are hosts, if not they are guests.
      Unless there is some kind of mutual 50/50 cohabitation of userspace with two different pid1s
      pid 1 left pid 1 right

      @cypherpunks @onlinepersona

      • Arthur BesseMA
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        2 months ago

        Can containers boot on their own? Then they are hosts, if not they are guests.

        It depends what you mean by “boot”. Linux containers are by definition not running their own kernel, so Linux is never booting. They typically (though not always) have their own namespace for process IDs (among other things) and in some cases process ID 1 inside the container is actually another systemd (or another init system).

        However, more often PID 1 is actually just the application being run in the container. In either case, people do sometimes refer to starting a container as “booting” it; I think this makes the most sense when PID 1 in the container is systemd as the word “boot” has more relevance in that scenario. However, even in that case, nobody (or at least almost nobody I’ve ever seen) calls containers “guests”.

        As to calling containers “hosts”, I’d say it depends on if the container is in its own network namespace. For example, if you run podman run --rm -it --network host debian:bookworm bash you will have a container that is in the same network namespace as your host system, and it will thus have the same hostname. But if you omit --network host from that command then it will be in its own network namespace, with a different IP address, behind NAT, and it will have a randomly generated hostname. I think it makes sense to refer to the latter kind of container as a separate host in some contexts.