EDIT: Thank you so much everyone! There’s so much help for me here, and I’ll recommend anyone with similar question as me to read the comments

Basically title.

I have the DVDs and I have the hardware to burn them to my PC.

But the file size is too much. What software would be ideal to get the best quality with the lowest file size?

I’m going for file sizes per movie at around 2-3gb max.

  • u/lukmly013 (lemmy.sdf.org)@lemmy.sdf.org
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    6 months ago

    Perhaps Handbrake.

    But if you do care about the quality, then you should just download those movies in higher quality than DVD. Like this you’re just getting 480p/576p with visible compression artifacts at the same file size.

    • TheMurphy@lemmy.worldOP
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      6 months ago

      Thanks, I’ll try handbreak!

      The problem is the DVDs is in a language I couldn’t find reliably to download. I once had access to a private tracker that had these things, but they got shut down, and I was on a long vacation while they migrated.

      So I missed the window and I haven’t been able to get in since.

      • Turing spider@lemm.ee
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        6 months ago

        Jellyfin supports external audio tracks (see here). It works pretty well, so you could rip the audio tracks from the DVDs with Handbrake and download higher definition video files

  • m-p{3}@lemmy.ca
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    6 months ago

    Handbrake would be the easiest. For commercial DVDs, you just need to add libdvdcss-2.dll in your Handbrake install directory and it will bypass the copy protection.

    For the container I’d suggest going with MKV. For the video codec you can go with x265 (HEVC) with a CRF/RF of 22, which should give you a good balance between quality and size. For the audio you can copy it as-is.

  • guitars are real@sh.itjust.works
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    6 months ago

    Since CRF settings aren’t that useful for hitting a specified filesize, you can use the following equation to calculate the bitrate needed to encode a video of a given runtime at a given file size

    • s = length of video file in seconds
    • t = target size in gigabytes
    • b = target bitrate in kilobit/s
    b = (t*8*10^6)/s
    

    ie, my copy of Serenity is 01:58:55 long, which is 7135 seconds (see https://www.calculateme.com/time/hours-minutes-seconds/to-seconds), I want it to be 2.5gb, my equation is

    b = (2.5*8*10^6)/7135 = 2803 kbit/s
    

    You can use any tool, handbrake, ffmpeg, whatever, any codec, and this equation will tell you the average bitrate needed to hit that file size. You would use “vbr” encoding mode instead of crf. I’d recommend enabling 2-pass for x264, not sure if this would be needed/is available for x265 as I’m a bit of a stick in the mud re: video codecs.

    Couple notes, I’m using SI units (powers of 10 instead of powers of 2) for the conversion, and am converting from bytes to bits as this is a more common unit to represent bitrates. If your software uses different units for the bitrate for some reason, or you prefer representing file sizes using gibibytes/etc then you’ll need to rewrite the equation accordingly

      • Blue_Morpho@lemmy.world
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        6 months ago

        Except don’t do that. Hitting an exact target filesize will unnecessarily compromise the quality. You want constant quality or some high motion scenes or high detail scenes (rain or large crowds) will look really bad because the encoder is throwing out quality to hit an exact file size target.

        Do a constant quality encode at say Q19. If the file is too big for you, up that to 22 and try again. When you find a q factor that’s close to the file size you want, use it for everything.

  • ANIMATEK@lemmy.world
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    6 months ago

    Since you are asking in c/piracy, just download it. Either Blu-ray RIP or Web-DL (ripped from streaming services) will have far better quality than a DVD RIP. Unless is something unique, there is no real benefit in doing the leg work yourself.

    If you want max bit-rate or lossless sound get a Blue-Ray remux. Otherwise WEB-DL looks as good for most people and weights a fraction.

    • TheMurphy@lemmy.worldOP
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      6 months ago

      Yeah, my content is unique and in a language not found at any public trackers.

      I’m asking here because some people may be uploading files themselves, and may have experience in compressing. And how to do it.

        • SquiffSquiff@lemmy.world
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          6 months ago

          Actually these days I would recommend using ChatGPT to get the ideal settings based on source medium and target quality/device

      • RvTV95XBeo@sh.itjust.works
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        6 months ago

        There is a third option for you - as others have suggested, you can use a tool like Handbrake to extract the content from your DVDs, but from there, if you’re feeling adventurous, you can acquire a higher quality release from… Somewhere else… Get it in .mkv format, and you can use a tool like MKVToolNix to extract the audio from your DVD copy and “mux” it onto your HD copy.

        MKV files are great because they are really just containers (like a fancy .zip), keeping the audio and video independent, allowing you to easily swap one out for the other.

        The only downside is you may have to edit the audio slightly to sync up with your video

    • notfromhere
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      6 months ago

      I would advise Handbrake over ffmpeg. I have spent months in both and Handbrake yields the best results with the least hassle. Crop, anamorphic pixels, quality, etc.

      H265 nvenc is supported on Handbrake now and works great. Very fast.

      • yessikg@lemmy.blahaj.zone
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        6 months ago

        I actually had problems using Handbrake a few years back, ffmpeg has really good documentation and almost every software uses it under the hood

        • notfromhere
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          6 months ago

          I have a custom ffmpeg script to automate what Handbrake does in a few clicks. Newer versions of Handbrake are great imo. I was on the fence and spent a lot of time trying to get ffmpeg going but there’s just too many variables for me to continue down that path.

  • retro@infosec.pub
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    6 months ago

    Start by using MakeMKV to rip the dvds onto your pc and then use Handbrake to decrease the size even further.

  • CCMan1701A@startrek.website
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    6 months ago

    makeMkv first and handbrake to compress. When using handbrake make sure to pick video and audio formats that work for your clients. I recommend h265 and eAC3 audio.

  • db2@lemmy.world
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    6 months ago

    Far more work than just acquiring a ready made one. It’s not worth your time to do all of them. Some so you can say you did it and know how, sure, but not all.

    Exceptions are for anything you can’t find, of course.

      • Scrollone@feddit.it
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        6 months ago

        If it’s rare content, it would be nice if you uploaded it to the Internet Archive

        • TheMurphy@lemmy.worldOP
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          6 months ago

          Maybe it’s rare but mostly it’s because I don’t have access to any private trackers in my language.

          • db2@lemmy.world
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            6 months ago

            If you can find the correct video though that will cut your encoding time way down. Then you’d only need to pull the audio off the discs and can copy the video stream from the file instead of the disc. I’m not sure what movies you’re talking about so maybe that wouldn’t work either, but it’s worth mentioning.

      • onlinepersona@programming.dev
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        6 months ago

        Do contribute them to I2P. That can’t be taken down. You can even use biglybt or qtorrent to seed to I2P and non-anonymous trackers.

  • CCMan1701A@startrek.website
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    6 months ago

    I noticed you are having an issue finding a partial language of content, you could extract the audio track from the DVD and add it to the copy you find on the seas.

  • Omega_Jimes@lemmy.ca
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    6 months ago

    My really nice blurays that are new, I use Make-MKV and I don’t compress them. My normal movies/etc, I just download high quality rips.