In the days after Alabama’s Supreme Court deemed frozen embryos to be “extrauterine children,” the chief justice’s ties to a movement that experts call “Christian extremist” have come to light.

  • NovaPrime
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    3 months ago

    You mean the old clown who straight up quoted his favorite fiction book and referred to Christianity multiple times in his opinion is a Christian fundamentalist?! Who could have imagined this!!

  • AutoTL;DR@lemmings.worldB
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    3 months ago

    This is the best summary I could come up with:


    Tom Parker, a Republican who joined the court in 2005, wrote a concurring opinion that quoted at length from sources such as the Book of Genesis, the Ten Commandments and Christian thinkers of centuries ago, such as Thomas Aquinas.

    But comments he has made in other media have raised questions about his seeming espousal of “Seven Mountains” theology, a concept that some experts consider to be Christian extremism.

    The Seven Mountains Mandate urges adherents to establish what they consider to be God’s kingdom on Earth by taking control of seven areas of society: family, religion, government, education, arts and entertainment, commerce and media.

    It also has earned greater media attention since House Speaker Mike Johnson assumed his elevated role, due to his connections with leaders in the New Apostolic Reformation (NAR) movement that espouses Seven Mountain theology.

    Taylor said it was specifically during Donald Trump’s term as president that the NAR movement and its leaders have come to occupy the center of Christian right political organizing.

    Parker’s close involvement with the NAR network was evident in the weeks after January 6th, when he joined its massive prayer phone call for Alabama in March of 2022.


    The original article contains 775 words, the summary contains 195 words. Saved 75%. I’m a bot and I’m open source!