When I was traveling the world I always learned about new food, then when back home I’d try to recreate it and invite friends and family who have no possibility to travel to taste it.

Now I haven’t had the possibility to travel to new places for the last couple of years, but I wonder if you guys have some tips what I could try to make. Something not too complicated but to some extend exotic.

My tip would be the the Sabich which I tried in Jerusalem in 2019. A flatbread with eggplant, egg, other vegetables and sauces. Sweet and savory.

  • anon6789@lemmy.world
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    4 months ago

    Curries are pretty hard to screw up, yet are extremely satisfying. Thai, Indian, Japanese, they’re all good.

    Pretty much just thickened stews, so you can add or remove things to your taste or make it seasonal. Can have any meat or can be vegan or anywhere in between. Serve up with rice or bread. Extremely versatile all around.

    Somewhat related, African Peanut Chicken Soup. Hearty yam and carrot, in a spicy peanut broth. It’s all familiar ingredients, but in a combo your taste buds may not be familiar with, so comforting and exotic at the same time.

    • anon6789@lemmy.world
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      4 months ago

      In addition to my specific recommendations, I recommend checking out Beryl Shereshewsky for inspiration.

      She cooks user recommended home cooking from around the world. She’s usually able to recreate them pretty accurately, but discusses substitutions if there’s something hard to get, which isn’t often.

      Her videos are by topic, so if you want a breakfast or dessert, or even as simple as an egg dish or toast, it’s there.

  • FragrantOwl@lemmy.world
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    4 months ago

    Ice cream soup:

    1. Place 2-3 scoops of ice cream in a bowl
    2. Use a tablespoon to vigorously stir the scoops in the bowl until they have the consistency of a thick soup
    3. Garnish with chocolate syrup and serve
  • Mouselemming@sh.itjust.works
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    4 months ago

    Exotic is in the eye of the beholder. When I was a kid (around 1970?) my dad brought home a couple of Russian Cosmonauts who were visiting JPL. My mom made fried chicken or something, but what fascinated them was her pecan pie. One was saying he would see if his wife could try making it, and we wondered afterwards how it would taste, considering they’d probably have to substitute walnuts… And did they have molasses or corn syrup?

      • daq@lemmy.sdf.org
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        4 months ago

        Molasses were not very popular though. Sugar was mostly used directly. Tons and tons of fucking walnuts. Never heard of pecans until iron curtain fell.

        • Everythingispenguins@lemmy.world
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          4 months ago

          Really, interesting I wonder where the molasses went? It is just a by-product of sugar production. I would have figured it would have been all over the place as a cheap sugar source. Do you mind saying what part of the USSR you were in? I wonder if it was regional? I will have to do some reading

          • daq@lemmy.sdf.org
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            4 months ago

            I’m from Ukraine, but I’ve been to a bunch of countries that used to be Soviet republics and I can’t say molasses were popular anywhere. It may have been used for animal feed, but not really popular in any human recepies.

    • Corkyskog@sh.itjust.works
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      4 months ago

      Pecan pie as delicious as it is weird. As an American I consider it an exotic delicacy, even if most of our aunties can make it.

  • apfelwoiSchoppen@lemmy.world
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    4 months ago

    Exotic, maybe not depending on your feelings on access to rich velutinous chocolate: ganache. Equal parts heavy cream and semi-sweet chocolate chips by weight. Heat the cream until just below simmer, add to the chips, wait 5 minutes and then mix. Profit.

    • Capt. Wolf@lemmy.world
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      4 months ago

      Totally second this! Super easy to make, tons of applications. Ice cream, cakes, fruit, you name it.

      I once made a chocolate ganache and a strawberry merlot sauce over ladyfingers for my wife/then girlfriend for our first or second anniversary. It took minutes to make, but talk about decadent!

    • Jarix@lemmy.world
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      4 months ago

      Hahahahaha i asked someone at work the other day what is ganache?

      Didn’t have and answer but you just did. Thanks! Now in know what was the stuffed piped over the baileys cheesecake i had the other day

  • kindenough@kbin.social
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    4 months ago

    Dutch Stamppot.

    Patato mashed together with fried onions and bacon and any vegetable you like. Raw spinach, raw endive, raw cornsalad, kale is cooked with the patato, sauerkraut (maybe kimchi?), or carrot+onions.Mash it all up with a bit of cream or milk, serve with brown or butter gravy and smoked sausage (rookworst), or pork belly, or pork chop. We Dutch mostly eat it in wintertime. It’s quickly made and filling.

  • Lvxferre@mander.xyz
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    4 months ago

    Okay… I don’t consider this exotic (unlike pumpkin pies), but you probably do so here’s how to prepare candied squash/pumpkin.

    Ingredients:

    • 1kg of squash. Any sweeter variety works*. Only the flesh; no seeds or skin. Cut it into large-ish cubes (~4 cm should be good)
    • enough water to cover the above.
    • 10g of food grade quicklime, or roughly a tablespoon.**
    • 500g of sugar.
    • 500ml of water. (yup, again)
    • whole cloves and cinnamon sticks to taste. 3~4 cloves and 2~3 cinnamon sticks should be enough.
    1. Put the squash cubes into a bowl, cover them with water, and add the quicklime. Mix it a bit, and let it rest for 3h.
    2. Drain the water and rinse the cubes. Then use a fork to pierce a side of each cube (so the syrup penetrates it.). Reserve.
    3. Boil the 500ml of water. Add sugar, cinnamon, cloves. Let the sugar dissolve.
    4. Add the squash cubes, and cook them in the syrup, over low fire. It needs to be low fire, otherwise you won’t be able to cook them evenly.
    5. Keep cooking them for 1h or so, mixing it occasionally. Be gentle, as you don’t want to break the cubes. The syrup should reduce quite a bit, and the cubes should be soft on the inside; some leathery skin is expected (and desirable), but if they’re still tough and the syrup reduced too much it’s fine to add a tiny bit of water to compensate the loss.
    6. Let it cool and enjoy. They should turn out like this:

    Notes:

    * traditionally this sweet is made with this sort of squash, known in Portuguese as “abóbora menina”:

    You can use pretty much any sweeter variety of squash though. Kabocha, pumpkin, buttercup etc.

    ** using quicklime on food might sound weird, but it’s fairly common across the world. For example they use it in North America to nixtamalise maize, and in China for century eggs. I don’t think that you’ll have a hard time finding it in Korea.

  • GluWu@lemm.ee
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    4 months ago

    Of you like meat and can get the correct chiles, you should make birria, specifically tacos. You can use mozzarella if you can’t find any Mexican cheese.

    • spittingimage@lemmy.world
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      4 months ago

      Every now and then I watch a Mexican cooking vid on Youtube and mournfully turn it off when they get to the chiles. In my country you can buy any chile you want, as long as it’s cayenne. For anything else, go to a speciality store and pay by the gram.

      • GluWu@lemm.ee
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        4 months ago

        You could try growing your own. They’re really easy to grow.

        • spittingimage@lemmy.world
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          4 months ago

          My wife’s a keen gardener and she puts a chile plant in for me every year. Right now I have a tiny crop of jalapenos I’m hoarding.

  • z3rOR0ne
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    4 months ago

    Quiche, especially without the pie crust, is as simple as whisking up some eggs, cheese, milk or cream, and whatever veggies/herbs you have lying around in a pan and baking it. Very good for breakfast and relatively easy to put together.

  • RBWells@lemmy.world
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    4 months ago

    Sauerkraut, just cabbage, salt, and time.

    If you like the middle Eastern food, delicious ful mudamas is so easy to make with canned favas.

  • Jerb322@lemmy.world
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    4 months ago

    The wife and I make crab rangoons in the air frier that are fairly easy to make.