Just trying to get by and learn.

Interested in Geography, Earth Sciences and History. 🇲🇾

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Joined hace un año
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Cake day: abr. 12, 2021

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I don’t think it really matters. When Queen Elizabeth died, the PM of my country wore our ‘national’ or traditional clothes to the funeral but that doesn’t really change the fact that they are western sheeple whose party enables far right fanaticism.

Keep in mind this PM also just recently gave a talk to the UN about abolishing veto powers in the security council and similar. Its all talk but no fluff. They act (and say) anti-colonialism but they are the most bourgeois of them all.

Reminds me of a quote by Fanon to be honest. Let me see if I can find it.


I do agree with your sentiment but I have to ask you to elaborate on how caregiving and domestic labour are separate issues?

What differentiates caregiving and domestic work? Are they not both performing the same duties?

Unless you mean the key differentiator is that for caregivers, the work is a necessity, but for domestic labourers it isn’t?


Yeah the extent of it also makes me depressed thinking about it.

I was researching a few weeks ago for a post I’m planning to make about the ultra rich arab gulf monarchies (which will not be finished any time soon lol) and how their economies rely heavily on foreign labour and my own personal experiences with it. And it’s crazy how much south Asian and southeast asian (female) workers are relied upon in domestic work.

Even in my home country (Malaysia) there is a market for domestic labourers from even poorer SEA countries, typically Philippines and Indonesia. Infact those two countries have routinely banned their own populations from working in various countries because of gross worker’s rights violations.

Just recently Indonesia banned domestic workers from applying to Malaysia due to the Indo’s gov claim that Malaysia has already broke their agreement regarding worker’s rights and safety. They have rescinded the ban afaik but alas this issue is persistent.

There are edge cases ofc. Such as taking care of elderly people but again it can be argued that capitalist work ethic means that family members aren’t given the time to adequately take care of their elders and etc.

It simply is disgusting how normalised it is.


Well, the only people that ‘hate’ Asians are westerners. Because to them we are a eurocentric blob united in our savagery.

‘Asians’ exist only in their heads, and ‘Asians’ only exist as long as a ‘Westerner’ exists.

Breaking down the term even in simple geographical terms, Asia is incoherent as it really denies the diversity in which many of our societies were built upon. In part they want to deny the centuries of cultural exchanges and trade so they can perpetuate their nation-building myths.

The Europeans built their nation-state based on a dominant race, so of course other countries can’t do anything but. Western society is the most ideal society (after all).

My point is, don’t get too worried about it. Western power is declining. Their chauvinism is not something we have to subject ourselves to for much longer. In fact, this rumbling and unhinged fervour showcases a very real phenomenon happening: anglo-westerners specifically are finally being treated as they deserve.

And anyone that is diaspora living in the West, personally I would start making connections and have a fall back plan to your home country. The rabid racism won’t stop here.


I mean I encoutered this song while watching a twitch stream. I just had to share it with you all.



It reminds me of Minecraft honestly with the free updates, and procedurally generated open worlds. I used to play Minecraft a lot (I still do but not as much), and NMS kinda gives me the same vibes, especially the exploration and building part.

I remember having to afk in the anomaly and someone just gave me a stack of fusion ignitors when I came back. I just started playing then (I think less than 15hours into the game) and I was really happy lmao. It made me want to be the guy that gives out those free ignitors one day.


I instantly got hooked when I played it again. And unlike when I played it all those years ago, it really feels like there is a lot of things to do.

Just recently grinded out for this ball black and white exotic I saw right when it flew out of the space station. Now I am trying to find an A or S class royal/alien multi-tool but to no avail. I know you can follow coordinates/ use portals into systems with the guaranteed tool but I like finding it myself.



Politics in this country btw. Too lazy to translate but to summarize the manglish in the daughter's insta story is that she feels 'very' guilty that she can't even do 'usual things'. Couldn't order starbucks because the corrupt prime minister was a 'FOODIE' and 'loved' caramel macchiatos. I wish I was making it up. We really did fail in nation-building by trying to emulate anglo-western modernity. Now we can't escape liberalism (this westernized individualism and also the rising tide of ethno-religious chauvinism).
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This is completely fine. In fact roughly 11% of wastewater is reused in the world. Not only for drinking of course. Industry, agriculture and even unintentional reuse all falls into that statistic. For some countries its over half of water use is from recycled wastewater, like in water-poor countries in MENA.

I do wish that all of us passed our high school science and geography classes? All water is recycled. The water on Earth is a closed system. The average residence time of water in oceans are 3000 years. Meaning that even any given water molecule in the ocean only remains there for 3000 years, before following the water cycle again.

Like I really am trying to not be condescending here. But this is the norm for many people already, including those in the West. This shouldn’t be controversial. According to this website, 20% of water in Chinese urban areas reuse water, with the government planning to increase that number even further.

So even if you haven’t necessarily drank direct reused wastewater, you may have used products, consumed food, that was made and grown from wastewater. It is all about the quality of the water that determines where it is used. Of course potable water must fit stringent health guidelines.

Typical media, as we all know, sensationalises these issues in their title to arouse feelings; disgust in this case. Even reading the article the actual quote goes

Part of the solution will be to reprocess the water that results from sewage treatment and turn it back into drinking water – perfectly safe and healthy, but not something many people fancy.

I do wish we all here can read past a heading?

This is indeed one of the ways that needs to be utilized to combat increased risk of flooding and droughts associated with anthroprogenic climate change.

I feel like our reaction to this article is probably a prime example of commodity fetishism obscuring the source of the water that we buy to the point where it seems that we just get the water from ‘untouched’ virgin sources that magically appear into our homes. But I am not too well-read on this so someone can correct me if I use the term wrongly.


Waterbending for sure. Even without all the Korra additions (I can write a whole essay probably why I don’t like Korra lmao), I do still think water is well, fluid. It’s flexible and has many uses.

And I always liked the dark ocean blue colour so yeah.


Asian food and asian fusion restaurants in the West are disastrous for sure.

It really is abysmal how food can be that tasteless.

If you want true ‘fusion’ food. Just come to my country of Malaysia. We had cross cultural contact with the 2 regions (India and China) with arguably the highest density of food diversity for centuries, mixed with our own local and SEA inspired dishes. (And even some middle eastern influenced dishes).

I also do hate the word ‘spicy’ because it doesn’t describe the varying different types of spiciness you experience from like chili, or peppercorns, or even just the ‘amount’ of spices. The spiciness you get from typical Indian food is vastly different from Malay or even Chinese dishes or even Arab (ie. Arabian peninsula) food.


Oh we have something similar.

The day after tomorrow, lusa. The day before yesterday, kelmarin.

Although, that’s in my own dialect. In other states/regions, kelmarin means yesterday and semalam means yesterday night.

Semalam in my original example is treated as yesterday (context dependent ofc), even though literally it means the night before.


What's a word in a language you know that is not directly translatable to English?
The word must be something non-political that is in everyday use or in common speech. For example, in my mother language there's the word *muak*, which describes the feeling you get after eating the same dish repeatedly, leading to you being sick of it and not wanting to eat that dish anymore. Tired (ie. tired of eating the same x dish/food) may be the closest word/phrase in the English language that captures the meaning, but not exactly.
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By people you mean western liberals and their reactionary compradors in the global south.

Even the national bourgeosie here realizes the threat of political Islam on their own profits.


Westerners crying that China helped subsidized their shitty liberal democracies since the 2000s and subsequently probably saved them from an even worse crisis than they are facing now. From [Pew Research Center](https://www.pewresearch.org/global/2022/06/29/negative-views-of-china-tied-to-critical-views-of-its-policies-on-human-rights/). Quoted from [South China Morning Post](https://www.scmp.com/week-asia/politics/article/3186192/why-do-singapore-and-malaysia-have-more-favourable-view-china-us?module=perpetual_scroll_0&pgtype=article&campaign=3186192) (paywalled): > Chong Ja Ian, an associate professor of political science at the National University of Singapore, said populations in Singapore and Malaysia were more “primed towards pliancy to authority” and tended to place more emphasis on economic performance. I really do hate this rhetoric that somehow Malaysia/Singapore values authoritarianism (whatever that means). Liberal politics will never understand how even if the 2 countries are functionally 1 party states and may not be the most socially liberal places in the world, the parties carried and boosted economic performance, making both nations the top 3 in GDP per capita in southeast asia. Personally, they would never get how economic performance has allowed my family to literally escape from poverty and peasant level subsistance farming to clean, modern houses and high-school/university education. Of course they wouldn't understand. Muh liberal values and hooman rights. The West would rather see us fighting for scraps and being unstable and war torn like the Middle East. Fuck them.
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Skin care is pretty much non-optional for me as I have long-term atopic dermatitis (under eczema), that on occasion flares up on my entire body.

Considering that insurances rarely cover skin care products except steroid creams/tablets, and the exorbitant prices that skin care companies charge on their products, it really is an expensive illness to have.

Well, atleast in the global south because they charge the same prices as in the West with <50% of the median income.


My response mainly pertains to your PS because it made me think about the role of pedagogy in different socieites but like in the other thread, I do agree that cultural values instilled on boys in particular plays a heavy part in how they treat school.

That’s interesting. Maybe because of my background, where my parents were born and raised in rural villages, and were able to climb up the social ladder because of university in the west, made it seem that university was non-optional. (That is to say I lived a completely comfortable life because of this). My grandparents never even graduated high school, only reaching the equivalent of key stage 2 or 3 in British terms.

I could also see it as being a much more wider implication. There’s this stereotype that people in the global south love education and those in the West hate it. I have definitely not read enough nor have any data proving this but it does make me wonder if there is some merit to this assertion.

In my home country, the government is very adamant in expanding university education. And unlike in the anglo West, although still needs to be paid, university isn’t as much of a money furnace. With talks of brain drain, and the like, it’d make sense that one of the key infrastructural issues plaguing development in the global south is, well, skill development and education.

Maybe in the West where they can rely on aforementioned brain drain, and the harsh realities of the job market meant that university has indeed fallen from prestige. It certainly does fit with the capitalist individualist motto that anyone can achieve their dreams if they work hard enough.

And also thanks for the fiction book recommendation. I really do need to expand my reading list from just nonfiction books lol.


I completely agree. I do definitely think that if anything, patriarchy and capitalism together contributes to many problems that men face. Such as the higher incidence of attempted suicide and depression (if i am not mistaken) or in this case failure in education. It is definitely plausible, and probably the most accurate, to say that its all these factors, ie. cultural and political-economic, that contributes to this observed underachievement in school.

As for your point about race, it is one aspect I didn’t cover, because I think for most people, or atleast those in this site, the affect of class and race on educational achievement is more or less obvious, if they had read any even basic marxist theory.

I am also acutely aware of the British educational system (not saying that this is specific to the British though) due to having gone through the international versions of both GCSE and A-levels, and as of currently studying in a British university. It is definitely not meritocratic, and it becomes clear that, lets just say, higher income families, can afford to spend extra tutoring sessions, have typically more stable family relationships or even to afford extra revision materials.

I think as for the term such as ‘disadvantaged’, it can also be interpreted as disadvantaged-by the system itself, and not directly putting blame onto the individual. I do see your concerns though, and thats the issue with identity politics that negate or disregards class as not important. I think as long as we use certain terms with disclaimers, as you have done, it becomes less of an issue, and we can talk more about the heart of the issue, like how disability and class intersect.

And on that small note about middle class and working class, its something that still irks me. I think we all agree that there is a certain portion of the working class that has absorbed and internalised bourgeois ideology due to their more privileged relation to production. Labour aristocracy comes to mind, but I understand that does not really particularly describe this scenario?

Petite bourgeoisie is another but of course that is more to do with small business owners.

When I rant I usually just say something along the lines of managerial/upper middle class/specialist but it would be useful to use a term more grounded in Marxist theory.


But for what reason would young men in particular be more sensitive to a job crisis that would push it towards to not going to university? Not trying to critique you or anything here, it just seems odd, as also a male university student, in which in my own limited life have been hammered from birth til now that university opens opportunities, would think if that were to be the case, be pretty much non-gender specific.

Keep in mind this is a global trend. The linked press release mentioning that more than 110 countries of the ~150 studied, had more women graduating than men. This includes a vast majority of middle income and low-mid income countries, in which STEM still pays well (at least better than the average). Where university education still isn’t as widespread as it is in the West.


Yeah in the podcast clip, the dude mentioned how ‘mainstream media didn’t want you to know this’. But a quick google search and I found articles from The Guardian and The Atlantic detailing this problem since the late 2000s. If that isn’t mainstream media then I really don’t know what is.

Further reading and I found out that this ‘fact’ was used since the 1990s with some scientific articles calling it a ‘moral panic’ especially in a UK and North American context from the early 2000s and onwards.

But nonetheless it is really interesting and its sad that a genuine conversation (without right wing hysteria) can’t be had in our current societies.


cross-posted from: https://lemmygrad.ml/post/345560 > Went and dug a little deeper and it seems that for high-income nations, this trend of more women than men graduating in universities (as well as outperforming in school) has been going on for multiple decades now. > > Apart of me wants to think its just right-wing hysteria because this was brought to my attention by some random podcast clip using this example as somehow proof that patriarchy doesn't exist lol. Some articles I read did mention how other factors (particularly class and race) was a higher determinant of school/university success. > > And I particularly do not like biological explanations anyways (too essentialist to my taste, but I can't say for sure). I forgot which article in particular but it did argue it's because men used to be able find jobs in more traditional blue-collar industries, leading to this present day discrepancy. > > What do you all think?
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Went and dug a little deeper and it seems that for high-income nations, this trend of more women than men graduating in universities (as well as outperforming in school) has been going on for multiple decades now. Apart of me wants to think its just right-wing hysteria because this was brought to my attention by some random podcast clip using this example as somehow proof that patriarchy doesn't exist lol. Some articles I read did mention how other factors (particularly class and race) was a higher determinant of school/university success. And I particularly do not like biological explanations anyways (too essentialist to my taste, but I can't say for sure). I forgot which article in particular but it did argue it's because men used to be able find jobs in more traditional blue-collar industries, leading to this present day discrepancy. What do you all think?
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Ah that’s useful. Thanks for bringing it up.


Went to a Taco Bell for the first time
I understand the memes now. They opened restaurants here a year back and never got to try until now. Review: Average price for American fast food in this country, that is, more expensive than local restaurants and seem to target the more affluent urban middle-class populace. Worst than ‘proper’ American Tex-Mex restaurants, which is expected; they are pricier. Overall: Not really sure why you would take this over other american fast food options if you crave it, honestly. Unless you are in for the gimmick of it (allegedly) being “”””Mexican”””” food. That said, I would like to try proper mexican food someday. There no real good options here that I know of though.
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The internet is a white supremacist, right-wing shithole: A (relatively) short story
I was sent a post on Quora. ![](https://lemmygrad.ml/pictrs/image/20157186-b746-428b-a2d0-878d814558cd.jpeg) This was my reaction to it firstly: I didn’t pay attention to the username and I just read the first paragraph. My mind was already raising alarms. Racist caricatures (filipino’s only eat rice and soy???) and estrogen ???. And creepy question and answer. (Sexual objectification; racism and sexism into one?) After I read the brackets I instantly texted my friend, and I quote, ‘it’s a fucking white supremacist alr account.’ I read the user tag and the use of the word ‘tittays’ and ‘jublies’ sealed the deal. Written by a man with an emotional maturity of a 12 year old. What does the facts say though? The soy – estrogen link has already been discussed a lot, hbomberguy’s video is an entertaining spin on it. I would also like to add that it perpetuates this notion of emasculated Asian males and western fetishism of Asian females. [BMI, weight and diet](https://www.healthline.com/health/average-breast-size), as well as exercise does play a role (see scientific article linked below also). Lets look at the first 2 results that pops up when you search average breast size by country: [Worldpopulationreview.com](https://worldpopulationreview.com/country-rankings/breast-size-by-country) and [worlddata.info](https://www.worlddata.info/average-breastsize.php). I’ll focus mainly on worlddata because worldpopulationreview cites worlddata and also another website that says ‘According to the latest surveys’ without any source. Seems legit. Then I found this gem on worlddata, while also not actually listing any links or proper sources. ![](https://lemmygrad.ml/pictrs/image/cad51c8a-f756-420b-b42a-06630276eaa2.png) AH okay so everything you said on the website is completely horseshit and is not based on actual numbers? Good to know. They say this after they tried inferring conclusions from their supposed ‘data’. This was after I found a [scientific article](https://pure.port.ac.uk/ws/portalfiles/portal/3113457/Breasts_are_getting_bigger_where_is_the_evidence.pdf) detailing how using bra-size is completely inaccurate way to measure breast size while also arguing that most surveys are unreliable due to not physically using tools to measure the dimensions. Worlddata acknowledges the faultiness of bra size, which is peculiar (to put it lightly) why they still labelled their overall site page as 'average breast size'. Conclusion The internet is shit. I stopped engaging with overt online political content for months now because I need to preserve my own mental health. I had a conversation with someone who self described as ‘apolitical’ and he said that the internet was not really racist or sexist. I second-guessed myself then because I was like ok maybe I just hang out in the overly political parts of the internet. Yeah no. Every month I encounter something that validates and justifies China’s firewall. The ‘normal’ (anglophone) internet is hell. Sometimes I wish I didn’t know English (maybe the anti-literacy anarchists were onto something 🤔). Kind of insane how after a quick search, everything this comment says is proven to be false. Note: If I got any of the medical facts wrong do tell me. I am not a medical professional.
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Copied below. The BRICS countries have backed a Chinese suggestion that the bloc should be expanded, but have not named the candidate countries. A joint statement by the foreign ministers of the bloc – whose other members are Brazil, Russia, India and South Africa – following an online meeting on Thursday supported its first expansion in a decade, but said they needed to clarify relevant guiding principles, standards and procedures. Although no candidate countries have been named, earlier this year Argentine President Alberto Fernández said he wanted his country to join, and analysts have said Indonesia is another likely candidate. Brazil, Russia, India and China initially formed the bloc in 2009, with South Africa joining in 2010. The meeting of five foreign ministers, including Russia’s Sergey Lavrov, was the first since his country invaded Ukraine in February. Chinese foreign minister Wang Yi repeated Beijing’s position calling for peace talks and criticised Western countries for providing arms to Ukraine and imposing sanctions on Russia. “Delivering arms cannot bring peace to Ukraine, and pressure by sanctions cannot solve the European security dilemma,” Wang said, according to a readout from the Chinese foreign ministry. He said China opposes the weaponisation of international economic and financial cooperation and coercing other countries to choose sides. He also called for an effort to reduce the spillover effect of the war, which has hit international trade and food supplies “especially in supporting vulnerable developing countries to tide over the difficulties”. The minister also urged the other BRICS countries to be “independent” and “fair” over Ukraine. Three BRICS members – China, India and South Africa – earlier abstained from voting on a United Nations resolution to condemn Russia for its aggression against Ukraine. The joint statement, with a brief address on the Ukraine issues, said the foreign ministers “supported Russia negotiating with Ukraine” and “discussed concerns over the humanitarian situation in Ukraine and beyond”. Without naming the United States, Wang called on the bloc to resist the creation of “parallel systems” to divide the world. He also said BRICS nations should oppose all kinds of unilateral sanctions and “long-arm jurisdiction”. The 25-point joint statement issued after the meeting included pledges to work together on issues such as global governance, climate change, anti-terrorism, arms control, human rights, and AI technology. China and Russia also expressed support for the three other members playing a greater role in the United Nations. Argentina was among the nine developing countries and emerging economies taking part in a separate meeting with the BRICS countries on Thursday night. Argentina’s ambassador to China, Sabino Vaca Narvaja, said the invitation to take part “was extremely important,” and constituted a step toward “formal entry” into the bloc. The other eight participants were Kazakhstan, Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Indonesia, Nigeria, Senegal, the United Arab Emirates and Thailand. Jiang Shixue, director of the Centre for Latin American Studies at Shanghai University, said the expansion of BRICS is seen as an “irreversible trend” by many observers. “Facing an increasing attack by the developed countries led by the United States, developing countries and emerging economies should expand our strength to play a bigger role in global governance,” Jiang said. Jiang said China has been making efforts in this direction since the “BRICS Plus” formulation was first mooted in 2017 with the objective of widening the bloc’s “circle of friends”. Xu Hongcai, from the China Association of Policy Science, said the bloc should invite Group of 20 countries with international influence and large economies, such as Indonesia and Argentina. “The G20 is composed of major developed and developing countries, BRICS lacks representation in ignoring other developing nations. It will be a good idea to first select G20 member nations to join the bloc,” Xu said.
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Honestly its so gratifying when something you’ve read lines up with what you encounter in the media. Still a gross injustice of course. The way mixed race marriages especially of colonised and coloniser (through their offspring) allowed Europe to exercise greater control of her colonies, acting as a bridge or middleman. Its thoroughly fucked up. Not to mention the racial/ethnic hierarchy that was then embedded in colonial societies across the global south, still present in the modern day. Fortunately, Allah didn’t make me mixed race with the (White) Shaytan. Alhamdullilah. Only got Pure™️ global south genes. But to be serious, this is what happens when you take liberal idpol to its conclusions. You apologize and give prizes to ‘one of the good ones’, in this case the ‘Indo-Europeans’ minority while ignoring and leaving the vast majority of Indonesians, in Indonesia, to suffer. We do not express enough hatred of the Dutch in particular tbh.
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cross-posted from: https://lemmygrad.ml/post/236002 > Copy pasted below. Amazing that news such as this is pay-walled. > > For more than 20 years, successive US presidents have given Saudi Arabia a pass on the question of whether the kingdom's government had anything to do with the 9/11 terrorist attacks. As the story goes, plenty of individual Saudis were involved — including 15 of the 19 hijackers and Osama bin Laden — but there was no evidence to indicate that the Saudi government itself was behind the attacks. That's more or less what the 9/11 Commission concluded, and the Saudi government continues to cite the commission's report in official statements as proof that "Saudi Arabia had nothing to do with this terrible crime." > > In its report, the commission took particular pains not to implicate Omar al-Bayoumi, a Saudi national who met two of the 9/11 hijackers in Los Angeles shortly after they arrived in the US. Bayoumi then helped them move to San Diego, where he signed as the guarantor on an apartment they rented. > > Bayoumi has long maintained that he met the hijackers by coincidence, a claim the commission did little to contradict. Instead, it painted a mostly innocuous portrait of Bayoumi's background, concluding that he was in the US "as a business student" and that he worked for the Saudi Civil Aviation Authority. "I don't believe he was a 'Saudi government agent' working to help terrorists," wrote Philip Zelikow, the 9/11 Commission's executive director, in response to questions from a journalist in 2007. > > But over the past several months, a raft of new documents released by the American and British governments suggest that the 9/11 Commission got it wrong. An FBI memo declassified in March, in response to an executive order by President Joe Biden, reported that Bayoumi was receiving a monthly stipend from Saudi intelligence. In other words, he was not a student but a spy. According to the FBI memo, dated June 14, 2017, Bayoumi was tasked with gathering information "on persons of interest in the Saudi community" and passing the intelligence to Prince Bandar bin Sultan al-Saud, the Saudi ambassador at the time. > > "Allegations of Albayoumi's involvement with Saudi intelligence were not confirmed at the time of the 9/11 Commission Report," writes the memo's author, an FBI special agent at the bureau's Washington field office, whose name is redacted. "The above information confirms those allegations." > > A second declassified FBI memo shows that a confidential source told the FBI there was a "50/50 chance" that Bayoumi had advance knowledge of the 9/11 attacks and "assisted two of the hijackers while residing in San Diego." > > The FBI declined to comment. But the revelations appear to undercut the Saudi government's claims that it had no ties to the 9/11 attacks. While US intelligence agencies have repeatedly concluded that the Saudi government as a whole had no advance knowledge of the 2001 plot, they have flagged specific Saudi agencies and members of the royal family as having ties to Al Qaeda. Last year, newly declassified FBI files complicated another crucial piece of Bayoumi's narrative, suggesting that his initial meeting with the two hijackers had been arranged by contacts at the Saudi Consulate in Los Angeles. > > Zelikow, the executive director of the 9/11 Commission, told Insider he's skeptical that Bayoumi knew about the plot, or that he was working for Saudi intelligence. Many high-ranking Saudis, Zelikow pointed out, were despised by bin Laden and opposed to his efforts. "The information that Bayoumi might have been a paid informant ... if it is true, actually tends to cut the other way," Zelikow said — suggesting that Bayoumi would have been working against the hijackers. > > In an interview with Insider, Thomas Kean, the former New Jersey governor who chaired the 9/11 Commission, acknowledged that Bayoumi "was definitely involved" with the Saudi government. But he remains uncertain about what form that involvement took. "There's no question he was involved with Saudi..." Kean said, and did not complete that sentence before continuing. "It's difficult in Saudi Arabia to decide who's who — whether it's the royal family or Saudi intelligence." Kean also reiterated that the commission found no evidence to suggest that Bayoumi had advance knowledge of the attacks. > > But a second raft of documents — released by the British government last week in response to a civil lawsuit against the Saudi government by the families of 9/11 victims — points to the possibility that Bayoumi knew about the attacks before they took place. Among Bayoumi's papers was a diagram depicting a plane descending toward a target on the horizon. Beside the diagram is a formula used to calculate the distance to the target. > A diagram showing a plane descending, beside a mathematical formula. > Among Bayoumi's belongings, British investigators discovered a drawing of a plane descending toward a target — and an equation that an FBI source said was used to calculate "the height of an aircraft necessary to see a target." UK Metropolitan Police via Kreindler LLP > > The diagram was seized by British police in late 2001, but its existence wasn't noted until 2007 — three years after the 9/11 commission issued its final report. It's hard to imagine an innocuous explanation for anyone possessing such a diagram shortly before the 9/11 attacks. "Sure looks suspicious — and sinister," said Philip Shenon, author of "The Commission," a history of the 9/11 report, which recounted dissent from some of the commission's staff regarding the extent of Saudi involvement. "Fair to wonder whether it suggests he knew in detail about the 9/11 plot." > > Mark Rossini, a former FBI agent who worked as a liaison to the CIA's bin Laden unit, didn't believe the Bayoumi had advance knowledge of the 9/11 attacks, which, he said, was limited to a small circle within Al Qaeda. But after reviewing the diagram, he changed his mind. "There's no question that guy was a Saudi agent," Rossini told Insider. "He lied. It's unequivocal." > > Zelikow, for his part, remains skeptical. He suggested that the drawing and calculations might be related to Bayoumi's work with the Saudi Civil Aviation Authority. "It is possible that someone working in civil aviation might have worked on such equations, for various reasons," he said. > > Bayoumi, who has returned to Saudi Arabia, has given multiple interviews to law enforcement over the years, but the deposition he gave in the civil lawsuit brought by the families of 9/11 victims remains under seal. It's unclear whether he has been asked about the diagram but, it's hard to see how the core question of Saudi involvement in 9/11 can be resolved without a full and credible account of his actions. > > The evidence declassified by the British government also includes videos showing Bayoumi filming himself and his circle during his time in San Diego. One shows him embracing Anwar al-Awlaki, a local imam at the time who had ties to Al Qaeda. Like Bayoumi, Awlaki was close to the hijackers. In 2011, he was killed by a US drone strike in Yemen. A second video shows Khalid al-Mihdhar, one of the two San Diego hijackers, in the kitchen of the apartment that Bayoumi helped him rent. > Still frame from a video showing Khalid al-Mihdhar at a party. > This video still shows Khalid al-Mihdhar, one of the 9/11 hijackers, in the kitchen of an apartment rented for him by Bayoumi. UK Metropolitan Police via Kreindler LLP > > The release of these new documents comes at an inconvenient time for the Biden administration. The US wants cheap oil, continued rights for military bases, and a revived nuclear deal with Iran. Saudi Arabia wants to end all discussion of the state-sponsored murder of Jamal Khashoggi and a free hand to pursue its brutal proxy war in Yemen. The last thing either country wants is a renewed debate over the Saudi role in 9/11. "The sad truth is that because of geopolitical issues, especially petroleum, we'll never go after the Saudis or hold them accountable," said Rossini, the former FBI agent. > > For decades, the US has allowed its codependent relationship with the Saudi royal family to circumscribe what was supposed to be an exhaustive 9/11 investigation. The more the loose ends become public, the harder it will be to avoid taking a closer, more complete look at who supported the hijackers, and why. The reason we have new information about Bayoumi's ties to the Saudis, it's worth noting, is because Biden decided to declassify more documents related to 9/11 — a much-needed step toward greater transparency. > > "All of a sudden, all of this information is available," said Karen Greenberg, who directs the Center on National Security at Fordham Law School. "Maybe we're finally coming to a sense as a country that we can look these facts in the face and tell the story of what happened."
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Copy pasted below. Amazing that news such as this is pay-walled. For more than 20 years, successive US presidents have given Saudi Arabia a pass on the question of whether the kingdom's government had anything to do with the 9/11 terrorist attacks. As the story goes, plenty of individual Saudis were involved — including 15 of the 19 hijackers and Osama bin Laden — but there was no evidence to indicate that the Saudi government itself was behind the attacks. That's more or less what the 9/11 Commission concluded, and the Saudi government continues to cite the commission's report in official statements as proof that "Saudi Arabia had nothing to do with this terrible crime." In its report, the commission took particular pains not to implicate Omar al-Bayoumi, a Saudi national who met two of the 9/11 hijackers in Los Angeles shortly after they arrived in the US. Bayoumi then helped them move to San Diego, where he signed as the guarantor on an apartment they rented. Bayoumi has long maintained that he met the hijackers by coincidence, a claim the commission did little to contradict. Instead, it painted a mostly innocuous portrait of Bayoumi's background, concluding that he was in the US "as a business student" and that he worked for the Saudi Civil Aviation Authority. "I don't believe he was a 'Saudi government agent' working to help terrorists," wrote Philip Zelikow, the 9/11 Commission's executive director, in response to questions from a journalist in 2007. But over the past several months, a raft of new documents released by the American and British governments suggest that the 9/11 Commission got it wrong. An FBI memo declassified in March, in response to an executive order by President Joe Biden, reported that Bayoumi was receiving a monthly stipend from Saudi intelligence. In other words, he was not a student but a spy. According to the FBI memo, dated June 14, 2017, Bayoumi was tasked with gathering information "on persons of interest in the Saudi community" and passing the intelligence to Prince Bandar bin Sultan al-Saud, the Saudi ambassador at the time. "Allegations of Albayoumi's involvement with Saudi intelligence were not confirmed at the time of the 9/11 Commission Report," writes the memo's author, an FBI special agent at the bureau's Washington field office, whose name is redacted. "The above information confirms those allegations." A second declassified FBI memo shows that a confidential source told the FBI there was a "50/50 chance" that Bayoumi had advance knowledge of the 9/11 attacks and "assisted two of the hijackers while residing in San Diego." The FBI declined to comment. But the revelations appear to undercut the Saudi government's claims that it had no ties to the 9/11 attacks. While US intelligence agencies have repeatedly concluded that the Saudi government as a whole had no advance knowledge of the 2001 plot, they have flagged specific Saudi agencies and members of the royal family as having ties to Al Qaeda. Last year, newly declassified FBI files complicated another crucial piece of Bayoumi's narrative, suggesting that his initial meeting with the two hijackers had been arranged by contacts at the Saudi Consulate in Los Angeles. Zelikow, the executive director of the 9/11 Commission, told Insider he's skeptical that Bayoumi knew about the plot, or that he was working for Saudi intelligence. Many high-ranking Saudis, Zelikow pointed out, were despised by bin Laden and opposed to his efforts. "The information that Bayoumi might have been a paid informant ... if it is true, actually tends to cut the other way," Zelikow said — suggesting that Bayoumi would have been working against the hijackers. In an interview with Insider, Thomas Kean, the former New Jersey governor who chaired the 9/11 Commission, acknowledged that Bayoumi "was definitely involved" with the Saudi government. But he remains uncertain about what form that involvement took. "There's no question he was involved with Saudi..." Kean said, and did not complete that sentence before continuing. "It's difficult in Saudi Arabia to decide who's who — whether it's the royal family or Saudi intelligence." Kean also reiterated that the commission found no evidence to suggest that Bayoumi had advance knowledge of the attacks. But a second raft of documents — released by the British government last week in response to a civil lawsuit against the Saudi government by the families of 9/11 victims — points to the possibility that Bayoumi knew about the attacks before they took place. Among Bayoumi's papers was a diagram depicting a plane descending toward a target on the horizon. Beside the diagram is a formula used to calculate the distance to the target. A diagram showing a plane descending, beside a mathematical formula. Among Bayoumi's belongings, British investigators discovered a drawing of a plane descending toward a target — and an equation that an FBI source said was used to calculate "the height of an aircraft necessary to see a target." UK Metropolitan Police via Kreindler LLP The diagram was seized by British police in late 2001, but its existence wasn't noted until 2007 — three years after the 9/11 commission issued its final report. It's hard to imagine an innocuous explanation for anyone possessing such a diagram shortly before the 9/11 attacks. "Sure looks suspicious — and sinister," said Philip Shenon, author of "The Commission," a history of the 9/11 report, which recounted dissent from some of the commission's staff regarding the extent of Saudi involvement. "Fair to wonder whether it suggests he knew in detail about the 9/11 plot." Mark Rossini, a former FBI agent who worked as a liaison to the CIA's bin Laden unit, didn't believe the Bayoumi had advance knowledge of the 9/11 attacks, which, he said, was limited to a small circle within Al Qaeda. But after reviewing the diagram, he changed his mind. "There's no question that guy was a Saudi agent," Rossini told Insider. "He lied. It's unequivocal." Zelikow, for his part, remains skeptical. He suggested that the drawing and calculations might be related to Bayoumi's work with the Saudi Civil Aviation Authority. "It is possible that someone working in civil aviation might have worked on such equations, for various reasons," he said. Bayoumi, who has returned to Saudi Arabia, has given multiple interviews to law enforcement over the years, but the deposition he gave in the civil lawsuit brought by the families of 9/11 victims remains under seal. It's unclear whether he has been asked about the diagram but, it's hard to see how the core question of Saudi involvement in 9/11 can be resolved without a full and credible account of his actions. The evidence declassified by the British government also includes videos showing Bayoumi filming himself and his circle during his time in San Diego. One shows him embracing Anwar al-Awlaki, a local imam at the time who had ties to Al Qaeda. Like Bayoumi, Awlaki was close to the hijackers. In 2011, he was killed by a US drone strike in Yemen. A second video shows Khalid al-Mihdhar, one of the two San Diego hijackers, in the kitchen of the apartment that Bayoumi helped him rent. Still frame from a video showing Khalid al-Mihdhar at a party. This video still shows Khalid al-Mihdhar, one of the 9/11 hijackers, in the kitchen of an apartment rented for him by Bayoumi. UK Metropolitan Police via Kreindler LLP The release of these new documents comes at an inconvenient time for the Biden administration. The US wants cheap oil, continued rights for military bases, and a revived nuclear deal with Iran. Saudi Arabia wants to end all discussion of the state-sponsored murder of Jamal Khashoggi and a free hand to pursue its brutal proxy war in Yemen. The last thing either country wants is a renewed debate over the Saudi role in 9/11. "The sad truth is that because of geopolitical issues, especially petroleum, we'll never go after the Saudis or hold them accountable," said Rossini, the former FBI agent. For decades, the US has allowed its codependent relationship with the Saudi royal family to circumscribe what was supposed to be an exhaustive 9/11 investigation. The more the loose ends become public, the harder it will be to avoid taking a closer, more complete look at who supported the hijackers, and why. The reason we have new information about Bayoumi's ties to the Saudis, it's worth noting, is because Biden decided to declassify more documents related to 9/11 — a much-needed step toward greater transparency. "All of a sudden, all of this information is available," said Karen Greenberg, who directs the Center on National Security at Fordham Law School. "Maybe we're finally coming to a sense as a country that we can look these facts in the face and tell the story of what happened."
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Link to twitter thread [here](https://twitter.com/phagafaga/status/1520788122178662400?s=21&t=LZdiY6_XqxvxxoqXHblvvQ). So today’s been a real stressful day since Eid is tomorrow (technically today its AM right now) and I have an essay due the day after aswell as exams in the few days. I am stressing the hell out on how I can make a coherent argument in my essay dealing with world-systems theory, eurocentrism and use of “networks” and flows in viewing the history of globalisation but reading the twitter thread made me realise, even if I fail at writing anything coherent it will never be as embarassing as any takes anarchist twitter has 💀
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[rant] I hate STEM bros so much
A friend (who is studying Engineering) asked my thoughts of [a clip of Joe Rogan](https://youtube.com/shorts/b95Hsfc1VJ4?feature=share) where his guest talks about how everyone can be rich if we just train everyone in STEM and they specifically mention not the social sciences. I wrote like a wall of text trying to explain why it is wrong to my friend but I just need to rant. I wonder why there is this push to STEM, perhaps to make the people not develop the critical thinking and skills required to criticize capitalist hegemony? I know this is like a very crude assessment but honestly what else can it be. This is anecdotal but if you don’t know, currently UK academics (more specifically the University and College Union) has been on strikes on and off for years now due to what they call the four fights: Low pay, Casualisation, Workload and Inequality. And a further one on pensions. I’ve just been asking my friends from different universities and courses if their department participate on the strikes. A picture starts becoming clear: academics and departments that are less politically minded ie. STEM, rarely participate in the strikes but those in Humanities and Social Sciences participate in the strikes. Even in my department which is ‘interdisciplinary’, its mainly those teaching on the ‘political’ side that participate in strikes. It may genuinely be due to much more funding that STEM departments get and hence less need to actually strike but the cause is the same: STEM fields and their practitioners are much more complacent in capitalism. Obviously STEM and STEM education is important, but the separation of academia from working class movements and subsequent promotion of STEM as an individualist ethos in how to change the world is literally an effort in subjugating what would be radical students into a proverbial cog in the machine.
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I think the problems with the image is self-explanatory and I just wanted to talk more about the school. There is a lot to say but firstly, I just want to characterize the class character of those in the school. The teachers were mainly white and British, or atleast western educated. The students were 99% non-white, of mainly 'expat' global south families living in the country, me being one of them. Looking at the international level, everyone one in the school is definitely top 10% in terms of income earners. Even the country itself the school is located in is top 10 in GDP per capita. The tuition of the school was about 5x university (national) tuition in my home country. So its honestly unsurprising that they thought this 'display' was okay. Unsurprisingly, aswell, most of my friends and classmates from the school now study in western universities (which also includes me) and also study STEM or law/business/econs or even worse, intrelations/polsci/PPE (thankfully I chose a discipline that I realise now has been influenced heavily by marxist thought and other 'left wing' movements). I just watched a documentary on London's gentrification, and that kinda prompted this post (which would also be my first on this site) since it discussed a temple in south London and its people being evicted because the landlord wanted the space to create a hotel and student accommodation. And that fact made me really accept that most of the international students in western universities genuinely just aspire to become petit-bourgeois and upper-middle class manager types, if not actual CEOs and bourgeoisie. That contribute to the suffering and in this case gentrification of minority working class spaces. That includes myself aswell, of course. So my own university's expression of being 'international' literally means including the larger international bourgeoisie as their students, really. Looking at the tuition rate for international students is enough for that to be self-evident. I really don't want to make this a 'woe is me' post but sometimes I wonder what life would be like if I did not read or was exposed to Marxist (or just left-wing) literature and was just a typical liberal. But at the same time, I would have then been complaining about the individual choices and actions of the school (if I were to even critique the 'display'), so I am thankful for that.
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