What’s your top BIFL purchase, that might not in itself has been all to frugal, but long term, will be?

After having 5-6 different office chairs over the last 10 years, none of which I liked. I went and bought a Herman Miller Aeron chair. It’s ridiculously expensive, but I’m so pleased with it and hope to keep it for well over 15-20 years. If that actually succeed, I will have spent less money one chairs than if I hadn’t bought it.

What similar items (cheap or expensive) do you feel the same about?

  • Gorgeous_Sloth@sh.itjust.works
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    8 months ago

    Just wanted to let you guys know that Bifl sounds a lot like “Bifle”, a unique french word. It’s a quite precise verb that means “slapping someone with a dick”. It merges the words bite (= dick) and gifle (= slap).

    That’s all folks

  • Pons_Aelius@kbin.social
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    8 months ago

    My hiking boots.

    Scarpa full leather, purchased in 1999 for ~USD300. They have been on 3 different continents, covered thousands of kilometres.

    They turned 24 a few weeks ago, I still wear them a couple of times a week and they are the most comfortable shoes I have ever owned.

    All for the cost of about $1 per month.

    Money well spent.

  • netburnr@lemmy.world
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    8 months ago

    Love my aeron chair, luckily I was able to steal it from my old job during a buyout.

    • AA5B@lemmy.world
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      4 months ago

      That’s great! I was able to get one overstock for half price. It’s still expensive, but it’s made working from home so much nicer, should last a long time, and I feel like a scored a great deal. Not as great as your deal, but still a thing

  • FireTower@lemmy.world
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    8 months ago

    Big fan of Osprey packs, they also do free lifetime repairs.

    Also I hear Aerons can be had for 1/4-1/3 of MSRP if you buy used.

    • rem26_art@kbin.social
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      8 months ago

      Used office chairs can be a pretty good deal, esp if you’ve got a used office furniture dealer nearby. I got a used Haworth chair for a bit over 1/4 of the price new and is way more comfortable and well built than the crappy gaming chair i had.

      Also, those higher end chair manufacturers have very long warranties, so if you check the manufacture date before you buy, you may find that its still got some warranty left in it.

    • ARNiM@lemmy.world
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      8 months ago

      In Indonesia, 99% of toilets have Bidets. Whenever I go abroad, it’s always annoying that it is the opposite, like 99% of the toilets do not have bidets. I’ve got so used to using bidet all my life and I wish every toilets in the world have it installed.

  • amio@kbin.social
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    8 months ago

    Maybe not literally for life, but having family that’s into the whole thrift store thing is pretty decent. Got a big honkin’ cast iron skillet and a stainless pan for super cheap, easy to fix and they’re likely to last a long damn time at least.

    • Bizarroland@kbin.social
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      8 months ago

      Quick note about cast iron, they are great on induction stoves, but if you have an induction stove and you want to get cast iron for it, before you buy the cast iron put it on a flat surface and see if it wobbles.

      If the cast iron has a warp to it it will not be ideal for an induction stove and the only way to fix it is to Mill it out which costs more than buying a high quality piece of cast iron.

    • AA5B@lemmy.world
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      4 months ago

      The last couple years, I’ve mostly switched over. After yet another over-priced set of non-stick “good” cookware started peeling, and now that I’m the one in control of the kitchen ….

      • set of Kirkland (Costco) stainless 5-ply, for less than a similar set of non-stick, it should last forever
      • set of cast iron skillets. Lodge is a great bargain, should last forever, and is frequently on sale.
      • a couple ceramic knives. Cheap ones are much sharper than steel, stay sharp longer, and can go through the dishwasher without fear. While good steel knives might literally last forever if you give them the attention they deserve, this is last much longer than standard, without any attention
  • Lexam@lemmy.ca
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    8 months ago

    Doc Martens. But not your Doc Martens. I was lucky enough to get in to the For Life program before it closed. Anytime my boots wear out or are damaged I send them in and they send me a new pair. I usually have to do an exchange about every three years.

  • wizardbeard@lemmy.dbzer0.com
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    8 months ago

    Something that I’ve not seen a lot of people talk about is a good lidded kitchen trash can.

    When I moved out I picked up the best looking option from Lowes, figuring maybe something marketed as meant for use by tradesmen might hold up. Hinge broke in the first month. At the end of the day all you need is a bucket with a lid, but when this cheap plastic molded crap is being sold for ~$60 I wanted better.

    Picked up a SimpleHuman bin on sale a few years ago and haven’t had any issues. Think it was around $200, so stupid expensive for a kitchen trash bin, but it looks and works just as good as the day it came out of the box. I would have easily spent more by now on the cheap Lowes bins.

    Never had any escaping smells (which can cause quite a surprise on trash day when you pull the bag out and get hit with what it has been hiding in there). Easy as hell to change bags, no fussing with stretching the bag around the top to get it to stay or hoping the first few things don’t pull the bag down into the bin with them. If you slam down on the foot pedal the lid doesn’t go rocketing up and slam against the cabinet it’s stood up against, it still opens nice and smooth. The lid doesn’t slam shut when you’re done either. Iirc they’re also warrantied for some outrageous amount of steps on the foot pedal mechanism.

    It sounds stupid to be so obsessive about such a minor household object, but if your kitchen trashcan is the central trashcan in the shared space of your home like mine is, then it’s something everyone in the house is going to interact with at least once a day. If it’s shit or lets smells out then it’s going to do that right in the middle of the most used spaces of my home. Similar to a good mattress, bedsheets, a good pair of shoes, for me this falls into the category of something I use often enough where it makes sense to spend a little extra.

    I’m sure there’s more cost effective solutions for good lidded trash bins that keep the smells locked away, but for something that was me taking a chance with some gift money I’ve been impressed.

    • IonAddis@lemmy.world
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      8 months ago

      Something that I’ve not seen a lot of people talk about is a good lidded kitchen trash can.

      I accidentally did the reverse of your BIFL with my trash can.

      I was at IKEA, and went, “Cool! A retro trash can!” And I got it. Because it looked retro. It’s the type that looks like a stereotypical trash can, round lid and all.

      …the materials hold up, but it sucks. There’s a reason the general design of trash cans changed from this type to the ones with the step-pedal.

    • SpeedLimit55@lemmy.world
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      8 months ago

      Yeah we have kitchen and bathroom simple human trash cans that are all 10+ years old. I buy rubbermaid for the office though, people are rough on them.

  • Ersatz86@lemmy.world
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    8 months ago

    Purchased a Tom Bihn Aeronaut 45 convertible shoulder bag/backpack in 2015. BIFL as BIFL gets. This bag has flown 100k+ miles, bi-monthly transcontinental flights and multiple trips to Europe. Massive YKK zippers, bulletproof waterproof shell, sensible compartments, multiple sturdy handles, fits underneath airline seats, and in cramped overhead bins, looks like the day I got it. If you occasionally get off the beaten path, place a high value on mobility, find roller bags silly and wasteful for anything but pure urban airport-to-hotel travel, and adhere to the one-bag school of travel, make this your one bag. At $330, it’s spendy, but my cost per mile/hour/level of satisfaction approaches zero.

    They also make a 30L Aeronaut bag that fits smaller bodies and goes in European budget airline overheads with no trouble.

    Disclaimer: maybe Tom Bihn has been acquired by another company? so cannot speak to current-day manufacture standards. I can’t verify from the website if this is true. You should check it out for yourself, though. It’s pretty cool. Going purely by the “about us” section I can’t believe a single thing has changed.

  • MasterBlaster@lemmy.world
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    8 months ago

    I bought a vanquest backpack about 5 years ago. Bullet proof. Mine is gen-2. The shoulder straps do not tear - ever. They’re expensive, but the craftsmanship earns the price. Their other products are good, too. This is just one type of backpack they make.

  • MasterBlaster@lemmy.world
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    8 months ago

    My aeron is 20 years old and still good. The mesh is a little looseer, giving a bit less support, but I’m still happy. You made a good choice.

    • glitch1985@lemmy.world
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      8 months ago

      I bought a used aeron a few years ago after using them at work forever. A few weeks after I bought it i turned it over to replace the pad on the front of the chair and saw that it was manufactured over 22 years ago. I would have never thought it was older than a couple years by how good of shape it was in but these things are built like a tank.

  • beeng@discuss.tchncs.de
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    8 months ago

    Osprey backpack

    Zwilling and wüsthof knives

    De Buyer carbon steel pans

    RM Williams boots

    Dynaudio speakers

    Thinkpad laptop (on Linux)

  • Showroom7561@lemmy.ca
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    8 months ago

    Arkel bike panniers.

    Expensive (like most high-quality panniers are), but they are built solid with repairable/replaceable parts, lifetime warranty that can be transferred*, and they are highly functional.

    Adding these to my bike has saved money by not having to use the car as much, and i don’t have to worry about replacing them every year.

    *The transferable warranty also means that if you buy one used, you’re covered! Ultimate frugal win.

    • ribboo@lemm.eeOP
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      8 months ago

      Those look nice!

      I bought a pannier backpack from Two Wheel Gear a couple of years ago, it’s been through so many miles both on the bike and on my back. Really sturdy.

      Can’t go wrong with a great pannier!

  • karpintero@lemmy.world
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    8 months ago

    Years ago I bought an insulated coffee cup and water bottle (klean kanteen) that get used every week, especially if I travel. When I get iced coffee and I can walk around sipping it and there’s still ice floating around hours later. Plus I can avoid single-use plastic cups if the coffee shop fills personal ones (some even give a discount!). The water bottle has saved me from having to buy overpriced bottled water dozens of times over.

    Another one is my bike. I bought a used Marin Muirwoods commuter bike from a local co-op and it’s saved from having to drive to any place less than a few miles away, like the gym. Less gas burned and wear & tear on my car. Plus it’s fun cruising around and is great exercise.

  • Omega_Jimes@lemmy.ca
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    8 months ago

    Greenbell Nail Clippers. Freaking sharp as anything and they’ve been my goto for about 10 years. I got them the same time I got my safety razor which is a great, cheap, beard removal tool.

    • Astroturfed@lemmy.world
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      8 months ago

      +1 for safety razor. Bought a Merkur Future like 7-8 years ago with a bulk razor pack. I am just now starting to run low on the bulk blades I spent like $10 on at the time.

      Better shave too once you figure it out.