Transitioning to PM (and generally speaking, to Proton For Everything) from Gmail, I was following the manual when I realised that PM wanted to replace my privately-owned, with mailbox service included, mail address.

What I’ve been doing for 15 years was hide a gmail adress behind my own domain name (quality of apps, quantity of storage, general user friendliness…); people would still see me as me@me.me, but I had the convenience of that google service while writing"as" me@me.

It also offered me a layer of safety, since downtime does happen, and hopping to the poor roundcube webmail interface of my hosting company allowed me to keep business as usual. Believe it or not, google has failed more often than that regional service provider. lol.

Now to the question: Am I right to understand PM will dutifully catch all emails to me@me.me, the DNS settings will kill my old-school IMAP mailbox to push them towards me@proton.me, and I will have to commit to trust Proton 99.95% (their current SLA for customers like me)?

Will I loose that last line of defense, Roundcube Webmail straight from my private provider?

Thanks is advance. For obvious reasons, I’m not on twitter, reddit & all that.

  • drudoo@lemmy.world
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    1 year ago

    I’m very confused what your previous setup was, but yes, proton has catch all for custom domains (fx blabla@me.me can be send to me@me.me) and as soon as you switch your DNS, your new emails will start to arrive in your proton mailbox. I had a custom domain with another provider for 10 years and I switched the dns and instantly I got all new emails in my proton account. Of course old emails aren’t transferred and will stay with your old provider.

    • ReallyZenOP
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      1 year ago

      Thanks! Am guessing you’re able to write as you@blabla.you from you@proton.me then?

      The way gmail handle this is crude, but effective: you give it your hosting company’ provided mailbox details (address, port, username, PW) and it “impersonates” you.

      It is super-convenient since the login data is provided by the hosting company, you just fill out a setup form in gmail. And your OG mailbox is still right there, untouched unless needed.

      I stopped the transition process when I realised I didn’t know what I was doing, blindly adding custom entries in my DNS host setup… Well I guess going back is just deleting the custom entries I added for Proton, and restoring the original ones.

  • RagingToad@feddit.nl
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    10 months ago

    Yes, that’s how it works. If you change the DNS settings it will send everything straight to proton.

    Ofcourse you could also do auto-forwarding. But as far as I know this disables the possibility to send from me@me.

    It’s annoying, isn’t it? :-/

    I’ve also noticed that if you want to send from anotherme@me you have to create an identity with that name first, which cannot be done through the app (you need to log in through the browser first). I typically register at services like servicename@me and when I email them they are always confused that I am sending mail from me@me (sometimes they refuse service because they expect me to send from servicename@me) so I have to go through the hassle of creating an identity.

    Sure there’s reasons for protonmail to work this way - but it’s very annoying. I guess there’s always a trade-off between security and convenience.

  • Time To Live@lemmy.world
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    1 year ago

    Your previous inbox stays wherever it was/is after you point the DNS to proton’s servers.

    After the DNS update has propagated all new emails will arrive at your Proton’s mailbox.

    Everything else in your post was really confusing to understand…

    • ReallyZenOP
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      1 year ago

      Sorry, not a native speaker

      • My domain name provider offers basic webmail service with my domain name

      • Gmail allows login in that service, writing "as* me@mydomain and retrieving incoming messages as well.

      • I’ve been doing this since 2006. If gmail is down, I just go to the webmail page for my domain and I’m good.

      Your phrasing of “after the DNS update” made it clear for me: all mails are handled by the new service referenced by the new custom DNS entries. My mailbox attached to my domain doesn’t disappear, it is just not in use anymore.

      Ergo, I loose the ability to log in to my original @mydomain webmail interface in case of proton outage/issue/billing conflict whatever. Or if money is tight.