• DaCookeyMonsta@lemmy.world
    link
    fedilink
    arrow-up
    104
    arrow-down
    3
    ·
    5 months ago

    I’m an engineer. I’m on my phone looking at memes until someone asks me a question, then I do a thing in 5 minutes that they expected to take 5 days because people don’t understand computers, then I go back to the memes.

  • ArchAengelus@lemmy.dbzer0.com
    link
    fedilink
    arrow-up
    52
    arrow-down
    1
    ·
    5 months ago

    As an engineer:

    1. Receive or identify a problem.
    2. Design a solution that solves or mitigated the problem.
    3. Usually pay someone to make a prototype or do it ourselves
    4. Test the prototype and see if it solves the problem. If no, go back to #2 until a workable solution is found
    5. Get someone else to build the final thing.
    6. Make sure thing works. Ship it.

    This is a recursive and iterative process. Meaning you will find problems inside your solutions and need to fix them.

    Eventually you finish the thing and get a new problem and do the whole game over again. It’s like a puzzle that requires absurd amounts of knowledge to play well, but anyone could try to solve the problem. That’s why good engineers are paid pretty well.

    • crapwittyname@lemm.ee
      link
      fedilink
      arrow-up
      5
      ·
      edit-2
      5 months ago

      That’s a pretty good run down. There’s all sorts of soft skills required for that as well, and hard skills specific to the industry they’re in, but I think you’ve got the essence of it. Also in step 6, add: “take responsibility for everything that will go wrong with thing in the future” aka “sign off”.

    • NielsBohron@lemmy.world
      link
      fedilink
      English
      arrow-up
      17
      ·
      5 months ago

      No joke, my wife’s grandpa was a mechanical engineer with a degree from Notre Dame, and he chose engineering apparently because as a 17yo, he thought he was going to learn to drive trains.

      • Excrubulent@slrpnk.net
        link
        fedilink
        English
        arrow-up
        10
        ·
        5 months ago

        The overlap between people who love trains and people who are good at engineering is pretty high though.

  • acockworkorange@mander.xyz
    link
    fedilink
    arrow-up
    24
    ·
    5 months ago

    “The Engineering Method” by Mark Hammond aka the engineer guy is a great read…

    …is what I would say if I actually purchased books from my wishlist.

  • WagnasT@iusearchlinux.fyi
    link
    fedilink
    English
    arrow-up
    24
    ·
    5 months ago

    I put the data in excel and make colorful charts to show management that their ideas are possible but expensive. Then do the same to show the cost of not purchasing maintenance equipment is in fact more costly than the necessary equipment.

      • crapwittyname@lemm.ee
        link
        fedilink
        arrow-up
        3
        ·
        edit-2
        5 months ago

        And then they point the finger six months later when the fan is covered in shite, am I right? An engineer is just an “I-fucken-told-you-so” generator. Sometimes.

  • Waterdoc@lemmy.ca
    link
    fedilink
    arrow-up
    13
    ·
    5 months ago

    Math using janky excel spreadsheets, tell drafters what we want drawings to look like, but mostly a lot of reading and writing. The secret to engineering (at least in my area) is that communication skills are just as important as technical understanding.

    • maniclucky@lemmy.world
      link
      fedilink
      arrow-up
      9
      ·
      5 months ago

      Yuuuup. Half the time you’re the expert* in the room and when heads turn to you you have to push the imposter syndrome down and know your shit and convey it well enough that people will listen.

      And having the good sense to know when to say “I need to look that up, let me get back to you”.

  • funnystuff97@lemmy.world
    link
    fedilink
    arrow-up
    13
    ·
    5 months ago

    Whenever people ask me what engineering work is like, I always tell them I have no idea. I’m not an engineer; engineers drive trains, I’m just a poser.

    (am computer hardware engineer)

  • matlag@sh.itjust.works
    link
    fedilink
    arrow-up
    12
    ·
    5 months ago

    Half of the job is to fix issues with existing suff, the other half is to make working stuff more complicated and problematic (aka “upgrade”), so that we’re still paid to do the first half.

  • Someonelol@lemmy.dbzer0.com
    link
    fedilink
    English
    arrow-up
    11
    ·
    5 months ago

    As an engineer I can say it can be a “hurry up and wait” kind of job. Around the 20% mark of a project timeline I’m 80% finished but then have to rely on a non-responsive authority to answer me back over some obscure part of the project. After that I just nag them and the project manager about it in email to cover my ass then do fuck all until they respond. At the 95% mark they answer back and I have to hurry up to finish. It can be stressful at times but it’s not bad otherwise.