@X51
link
171M

Many years ago my dad had bought a Windows 95 computer for his business and didn’t know how to use it. I was tasked with learning how to use it and I did. I started tweaking the settings and assigning custom .wav files to all the events. I chose “Simpsons” related .wav files for most of the events. If you clicked on a Start Menu item, you’d hear Homer Simpson say “Doh!”.

I wanted to know if background programs were starting so I assigned a wav. file to that event.

One day, my dad was using his Windows 3.1 computer and trying to get a programmer to simplify some task on 3.1. The programmer tells my dad “Some things just can’t be done.” My dad says “Why?”. The programmer just wanted my dad to drop the request. He replied, “Sometimes computers are just stupid.”

At the exact moment he said that, a hidden program started running in the background on the adjacent Windows 95 computer. The event triggered a .wav file to play. The Windows 95 computer “speaks” and says “Kiss my hairy yellow butt.”

It interrupts the conversation my dad is having and they both turn and stare at the computer.

In some cases, computers don’t like being insulted and they don’t like foul language.

Adda
link
71M

That is truly a lovely story. Hilarious.

@X51
link
31M

Even better because it’s true.

@Jeffrey
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61M

Haha, is it just an alias for sudo?

Adda
link
3
edit-2
1M

I believe it is an alias for doas instead because of the formatting of the password request. But basically, yes, it seems to be an alias to either of these programs.

@SudoDnfDashY
creator
link
31M

Its actually sudo.

Adda
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2
edit-2
1M

Is it? How did you manage to change the password request format from [sudo] password for <user>: to Password:? Because the Password: format is exactly what doas uses.

@SudoDnfDashY
creator
link
21M

I honestly don’t know lol. I did really just Alias sudo.

Adda
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2
edit-2
1M

Now, that is really strange. Is maybe your sudo already an alias for doas by any chance? Could you run the following in your terminal, for example?

$ which sudo

It should either say sudo: aliased to doas, or something like /usr/bin/sudo. The former would confirm my suspicions, that you have sudo aliased to doas already, the latter would mean you call the normal sudo command.

@yxzi
link
31M

link’s broken…

poVoq
link
41M

There is no link, it is a .mp4 file.

@yxzi
link
31M

Right, just needed to open it in the web version

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Linux is a family of open source Unix-like operating systems based on the Linux kernel, an operating system kernel first released on September 17, 1991 by Linus Torvalds. Linux is typically packaged in a Linux distribution (or distro for short).

Distributions include the Linux kernel and supporting system software and libraries, many of which are provided by the GNU Project. Many Linux distributions use the word “Linux” in their name, but the Free Software Foundation uses the name GNU/Linux to emphasize the importance of GNU software, causing some controversy.

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