what is better for single user instance, or maybe something small like under 10 users (no communities)? which is lighter on resources? how much storage should I allocate?

any alternatives to lemmy and kbin that are still somewhat similar?

  • @LargeHardonCollider@lemmy.world
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    18 months ago

    I’m still kinda new to lemmy, but it sounds like every post on all your communities get sent to your instance? And maybe every comment?

    That’s probably fine for now, but when happens when one of the communities you follow gets a ton of users? I imagine you’d end up having to scale your self-hosted server even though it’s just you consuming the content?

    That doesn’t seem sustainable. Not knocking your idea to self-host, more concerned with the scalability of lemmy

    • Jamie
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      68 months ago

      That’s correct. I’m replying to you on jamie.moe right now, but in reality, what I’m seeing is a copy of what lemmy.world has. When someone makes a post, leaves a comment, or whatever, all of the instances that are federated and have one subscriber in the relevant community get updated with the change.

      When I read this thread, I’m actually reading a copy of the thread stored on my own instance, and my instance just tells lemmy.world when I leave a comment and it will update everyone else. While it isn’t very storage efficient, it does even out the load since users on one instance only require a single update from the main instance for all of those users to interact with that content, rather than instances asking for copies of things every time a user on one instance needs it. It spreads out the load nicely and lets even underpowered hardware serve wider communities than it could otherwise.

      The downside is you have to have the storage space to keep content for your user(s). Though, getting a lot of storage space isn’t expensive at all, so I would say it’s a minor concern. Lemmy uses little in terms of RAM and compute, those two factors are the biggest things that can up your cost really fast. A gigabyte of storage on a server can typically be gotten for a fraction of a penny.