The Best Ways To Install Deb Files
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When software is not in the repo’s, You will have to use other options. Snap, Flatpak, and appimages are all goof. However, when using Debian/Ubuntu based distros there is a option witch in my opinion is better than all of these. Deb files. Deb files are files that allow you to install the files on your system. Most applications will have their .deb file online. However, they can be difficult to install. I am going to go over the best way to use .deb files to install software on your system.
@Madiator2011
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sudo apt install ./nameofdebfile.deb

@daelphinux
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#dpkg -i /path/to/deb/file && apt --fix-missing install

Don’t even @ me about it. You all know it’s true.

@remram
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Only because the above is not well known.

@AgreeableLandscape
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The important part of the article:

When software is not in the repo’s, You will have to use other options. Snap, Flatpak, and appimages are all good. However, when using Debian/Ubuntu based distros there is a option that in my opinion is better than all of these. Deb files. Deb files are files that allow you to install the package on your system using a file. Most applications will have their .deb file online. However, they can be difficult to install. I am going to go over the best way to use .deb files to install software on your system.

[…]

Using apt is my preferred way of installing .deb files. It is not graphical, but is is very easy and means that you not only don’t have to install anything, but you don’t have to fix anything after the installation either. To install using apt, you will have to use the terminal to cd into the directory where the .deb file is. Then type this in the terminal.

sudo apt install ./NameOfFile.deb

@federico3
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Also: sudo debi --with-depends <fn>.deb

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Linux is a family of open source Unix-like operating systems based on the Linux kernel, an operating system kernel first released on September 17, 1991 by Linus Torvalds. Linux is typically packaged in a Linux distribution (or distro for short).

Distributions include the Linux kernel and supporting system software and libraries, many of which are provided by the GNU Project. Many Linux distributions use the word “Linux” in their name, but the Free Software Foundation uses the name GNU/Linux to emphasize the importance of GNU software, causing some controversy.

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