UNIX source code

Is there any source code of the originl UNIX? If it is, why is anybody using it for giving life again the first Unix?

Rain
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Pretty sure the reason why Linux (and other OSes) was made were made was because the source is not public.

@IanThePirate
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Actually yes, but currently the source has been filtered and maybe we could make a new UNIX

dandelion
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deleted by creator

@4815162342
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He mostly got Minix because it was what the book he was inspired by used and talked about, so it’s what he knew about. He had to pay quite a bit of money for it from the bookstore (in his autobiography he notes that comically you could buy the book at the computer store, but because there was so little interest in buying Minix you had to special order it from the book store).

From there he made Linux because he didn’t like a lot of things about Minix, namely the terminal emulator.

I’ll summarize some of where he talked about it all in his autobiography:

First, he bought the book Operating Systems: Design and Implementation by Andrew S. Tanenbaum, the book he credits with changing his life. (In his autobiography he talked about how everybody has a book that’s changed their life and then lists books including The Holy Bible as examples before naming the book that fits that bill for him.)

The next year in school was going to be the first time his school used Unix, and the Operating Systems book used Tanenbaum’s Unix clone, Minix.

Because of all of that, Linus decided he wanted to get a computer with a 386 that he could run Unix on (at the time he only had a Sinclair QL), and he planned to run Minix on it because that’s what was covered in his book. (His school had a MicroVAX running Ultrix, Digital Equipment Corporation’s version of Unix.) But he couldn’t afford one at first, so his only access was going to be by connecting to the school’s new computer with his Sinclair.

Then, on January 2, 1991 he went in to make his purchase (on credit):

It was at one of these small corner shops, sort of a mom-and-pop computer store, only in this case it was just pop. I didn’t care about the manufacturer, so I settled on a no-name, white-box computer. The guy showed you a price list and a smorgasbord of what CPU was available, how much money, what disk size. I wanted power. I wanted to have 4 megabytes of RAM instead of 2 megabytes. I wanted 33 megahertz. Sure, I could have settled for 16 megahertz, but no, I wanted top of the line.

Then, they built it, and he picked the computer up three days later. The computer came with a version of DOS, so he ordered a copy of Minix which took over a month to get to Finland. (He notes that the cost was “$169 plus taxes, plus conversion factor, plus whatever. I thought it was outrageous at the time. Frankly, I still do.”)

(Fun side note: He spent the month waiting for Minix playing Prince of Persia on his new computer. )

When he got it he immediately set about installing it via the 16 floppy disks it came on. He spent his whole weekend getting used to it and finding things he liked and (more importantly) didn’t like about it. He says that since Minix was only meant to be a teaching aid it was purposely crippled in bad ways.

The biggest letdown he had with Minix was terminal emulation.

So, he decided he was going to create his own terminal emulator, but he wanted to do it at the hardware level, not under Minix. To download and upload files from/to the school’s computer he needed a disk driver and a file system driver (which he planned to make compatible with Minix). And from there it went; that’s when he decided he was making an operating system.

dandelion
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@4815162342
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You’re welcome. His book, Just for Fun, is pretty interesting if you like reading about that sort of stuff.

Publisher’s page: https://www.harpercollins.com/products/just-for-fun-linus-torvaldsdavid-diamond?variant=32118179364898

Archive.org borrow-able version: https://archive.org/details/justforfun00linu

It can also be found on Library Genesis.

dandelion
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An answer to your first question is maybe here : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berkeley_Software_Distribution

BSD was initially called Berkeley Unix because it was based on the source code of the original Unix developed at Bell Labs.

The earliest distributions of Unix from Bell Labs in the 1970s included the source code to the operating system, allowing researchers at universities to modify and extend Unix.

@IanThePirate
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I already know that but all the BSD distros have a different source code now, because of the copyright. But I mean, I’d a UNIX. A new UNIX with the original code and same features and programs, but maybe with new features and platforms, just like MINIX.

@IanThePirate
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LOVE IT!

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