@dugite_code
link
151Y

I switched to linux on my home desktop primarily due to the advertisements in the Windows 10 start menu. That and with Steams proton (aka wine integration) I can play most of my library without loading my old windows partition.

@Rumblestiltskin
link
131Y

I think we have seen it increase as so many people are working from home. In the corporate office a lot of Linux users will be forced to use windows. These users will now be recorded as Linux users when they visit websites during working hours which likely was a huge portion of the time they were visiting websites.

@ajz
creator
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41Y

That was my thought exactly weeks ago.

@penloy
link
121Y

As a developer, I just think closed source applications and the entire operating system being closed source is detrimental to my development as a programmer.

@AgreeableLandscape
mod
admin
link
11Y

Ever tried doing web development on Windows? If it’s not ASP.NET, it’s a nightmare.

@otso
link
121Y

I started my free software journey years ago on tiny notebook asus computer. I bought it because I was young and needed something cheap but windows was a drag. The 32Gb flash hard drive was over half full with OS files alone, and trying to play even old indie games was so slow. I’m not sure how I decided it, but I installed manjaro and suddenly my computer was fast and I had ~30Gb free space, since then I have gotten a better laptop, but I haven’t gone back to windows (although, I did ditch linux for OpenBSD on my daily driver)

kvuj
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6
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1Y

deleted by creator

@otso
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3
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1Y

Yes, I came for the coding philosophy but stayed because you can really see the coding philosophy in action. I loved linux, but nothing “just worked” like it does on openbsd. No more configuring xinput, no more fixing a broken grub. For how intimidating linux users make it sound, using it feels so intuitive. EDIT: and did I mention the man files?

@developred
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3
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deleted by creator

@otso
link
21Y

https://www.c0ffee.net/blog/openbsd-on-a-laptop/ is great guide for getting started. If you haven’t checked it out though, just look at the OpenBSD laptop. The FAQ there is more a guide to using it than a typical FAQ page. Also, if you think you’re ok with man pages on linux, just try OpenBSD man pages. The man pages are outstanding resources, and frequently my first reference. Other than that, you pretty much need to install it and try it out. Once you do, your best resources are man afterboot and man intro.

@developred
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1
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9M

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Ephera
link
101Y

I just now realized that the number of Linux users in my household also tripled, since I migrated both my parents after Windows 7 became unsupported.

Sure, that’s an extreme case, but even with rather few such extreme cases, that’s going to do something to the usage share.

I imagine, Linux gaming being in a really good position now and a growing need in companies to have Linux for all the hip technologies (Cloud & IoT), play a role as well.

@SirLotsaLocks
link
31Y

I imagine, Linux gaming being in a really good position now and a growing need in companies to have Linux for all the hip technologies (Cloud & IoT), play a role as well.

This is a really good point, since game streaming is turning out to be a desired market linux gaming will probably benefit from that

Ephera
link
21Y

Sure. I don’t think that particular market has much of an impact yet, but it’s also an influence.

I was more so talking about Proton (Valve’s WINE fork). A lot of games, even many AAA titles, are nowadays just playable. To the point where the “linux gaming” community has kind of disappeared almost, because they’re just gaming, and they’re also on Linux.

There’s still some hurdles, in particular DRM and anti-cheating software, as those think they’re being tampered with, if they’re being run through WINE/Proton, but yeah, for many people it’s now just perfectly fine.

@developred
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2
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9M

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Ephera
link
81Y

They’re not at all techie. Sure, they’re steadily learning, but mostly still in the phase of just opening a browser and doing everything in there.

Which is crucial here. They clicked on Firefox in Windows, they click on Firefox in KDE, it’s not really different. My dad even understands the systray and he’s figured that out just the same in KDE.

Like, it’s been incredibly underwhelming to switch them over (in a good way), as I just showed them once how to login, how to start Firefox and how to shut down the PC again, and that’s all the instructions they needed.

Tech-support-wise, my dad needed his printer set up for him, which was a bit of an annoyance, since it ran into an error every now and then, and then it would get automatically disabled. There was a GUI toggle to just not have it be disabled after an error, so that was that.

And my mom has needed me to activate DRM playback in Firefox, since that’s disabled by default on Linux.

That’s all the Linux-related tech support, I’ve had to do since last year (the rest was Firefox related or for other devices).

And I should add that my dad is on the bleeding edge, rolling-release openSUSE Tumbleweed (I wanted the automatic snapshots and YaST from openSUSE, but openSUSE Leap’s kernel was too old for his brand new PC at the time). I also accidentally set up automatic dist-upgrades in YaST (didn’t think that was possible), so he’s just continuously getting the freshest software without me or him doing anything.
Which is kind of fucking terrifying, but well, I’m also really not worried about it, because of those snapshots. I can just wait until something goes wrong, before I do something. I am still impressed that it has been smooth sailing so far.

Compared to Windows, it feels like it has become less tech support. Maybe half as many issues and those issues feel easier to resolve, but I also just don’t hate doing tech support on Linux, as it’s always a solvable puzzle rather than guesswork.

@developred
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3
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deleted by creator

@Stavros
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41Y

My experience echoes Ephera’s, I switched my dad over and basically told him “This is where Firefox is now” and that was it. Everything else, he figured out by himself.

It’s not like he was very deeply tied with the OS, but he does use SketchUp to design things, AutoCAD for some others, writes documents, etc, so there was a bit of a learning curve (mostly which folders are for what).

My support load has dropped to basically zero, since they don’t get viruses now.

Future Me
link
101Y

License fees. Buying Windows is really expensive.

@otso
link
11Y

I’m not recommending windows, but did you know you can run windows 10 with no license (but less customization) and you can buy them third party for much cheaper

Future Me
link
11Y

I know, I know. Anyway, this stuff makes (and made) me want to switch to Linux.

Ephera
link
21Y

I even just hate having to deal with licenses. An OS is a tool to me. I don’t want to have to think on every step, if I’m allowed to replace the hard drive, put it on a USB stick, install to another device/VM and so on. I want it to be the glue in all of this that just works and that I can use as much of as I want.

@otso
link
21Y

True, and tbh. Linux just works better.

@Bloodaxe
link
101Y

For me it was about reclaiming the feeling of fully owning my PC and the information on it. + I absolutely love the idea of FOSS 😎 I doubt I represent the average Windows user though xD

Metawish
link
91Y

Basically what the article said, switching over to Linux for many reasons; MS OS feels less like a laptop and more like a tablet or phone, bloated, unable to get rid of programs, security; and, recently, wanting an open source OS after learning how important it is. The only reason my main laptop hasn’t been converted yet is because I googled “Samsung Linux” and saw articles on how samsung linux users updated their distro and completely bricked their laptop, rendering it trash and I got nervous haha

@ajz
creator
link
31Y

Nice that you stepped into the open source world! Curious to hear more details about Samsung laptops that get bricked by Linux upgrades.

Metawish
link
31Y

https://www.cnet.com/forums/discussions/warning-about-samsung-laptops-uefi-linux-610118/ has the summary of it, so I’m just worried about messing with linux on it until I find confirmation that it won’t destroy the laptop

@ajz
creator
link
61Y

Cheers. The article you pointed to says :

“It was also soon discovered that a Linux boot is not the only way the bug can be triggered – Windows users are also at risk.”

Also found this : https://www.anandtech.com/show/6734/samsung-laptop-uefi-bugs-not-just-for-linux

showerthought - Buy refurbished Thinkpad, install open source OS, be happy ever after ;)

Metawish
link
31Y

If that’s the case I should just take the risk and install linux haha, my stuff is backed up on an external hard drive, so if anything I get to scrap the laptop for parts then, thanks for letting me know! Linux here I come

@ajz
creator
link
31Y

Cheers, have fun ! :)

@otso
link
31Y

Check your local craigslist, or if you have a university surplus store nearby it might be possible to find very decent affordable thinkpads. There’s a t400 on my local craigslist for $70 right now. Alternatively, here is an awesome guide.

@Wheeljack
link
91Y

I think that it’s helping that Linux has come a long way in terms of being newbie-friendly. Knoppix was a game-changer for me, because with it I never had to think about drivers; I could drop it on any system and, nine times out of ten, everything just worked. Doing a Linux install used to be enough of a pain that LUGs would do install-fests, now installing Linux is daresay easier than installing Windows. Ubuntu has been a huge boon for new users; people may not like Canonical’s practices, but they’ve done a lot for making Linux a usable daily driver for people who aren’t power users. Valve/Steam has put a lot of time into making gaming much more feasible, removing yet another excuse people had to stay on Windows. If Adobe products stopped being offered on Windows (which supposedly Adobe devs are in support of), that would push even more people away from Microsoft.

@Bloodaxe
link
81Y

As a relative newbie, I can say that it has come a long way just these past 3 years. I’m now able to easily enjoy all my games on Linux, despite having little to no deeper technical understanding of the system. i’ve done nearly all the necessary work through GUI, and that’s a huge step in the right direction for a non-techsavy person.

@AgreeableLandscape
mod
admin
link
61Y

Can we also throw Mac OS under the bus while we’re at it? It’s just as if not more locked down as Windows, also has bloatware (apparently you can’t uninstall most of the stuff that Apple gives you), and the company behind it has been trying to fuck over open source and right to repair since basically ever (I will give that they are better at the privacy thing than Microsoft, but that’s not exactly hard to do).

@ajz
creator
link
3
edit-2
1Y

Yes, that might be true. The thing is that Apple is since ages a precious jewel for countless non-geeks, graphic designers, film makers, and old-aged people to get their work and fun done. And for geeks MacOSX is interesting as well (terminal, tools, brew.sh, build on some of a BSD hybrid). I am not at all a fan of Apple but, to give them some credit, they did a good job to make non-geeks feel comfortable.

@AgreeableLandscape
mod
admin
link
5
edit-2
1Y

Honestly, the biggest reason I despise them as an environmentalist is their planned obsolescence and repeated attempts to strike down right to repair. They’ve done this since at least the start of the Macintosh product family.

Even little things like removing the headphone jack is bad because it forces users to potentially replace their headphones even though they still work.

This, combined with the “consume product” mentality of your average person, is a massive middle finger to the environment.

@ajz
creator
link
3
edit-2
1Y

Honestly, the biggest reason I despise them as an environmentalist is their planned obsolescence and repeated attempts to strike down right to repair. They’ve done this since at least the start of the Macintosh product family.

Yes, very bad, and maybe it shows their desire for centralization and control.

One other thing I’d like to mention is the price ticket. Years ago I’ve tinkered with old Apple computers - and have Linux on them - with the Motorola processors (Before Apple embraced Intel products). Those older Apples all had SCSI drives, which were/are about 3 or 4 times expensive as IDE hard disks. So, in my theory, that explains the higher price for an Apple computer back in the days, which is quite fair. Now, at some point Apple said goodbye to SCSI disks, and what did they do ? Lower the prices ? No, prices gradually went up as usual. And that could be one more reason to dislike Apple. If they were honest and genuinely concerned about their consumers, they could have dropped the prices.

@maybesaydie
banned
link
11Y

Mac OS is open source https://opensource.apple.com/

kvuj
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1
edit-2
1Y

deleted by creator

@lps
link
61Y

No keylogging and Telemetry. How to disable:

https://www.techjunkie.com/disable-keylogger-windows-10/

@Kamui
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21Y

Yup, complete disregard for user privacy I would say.

@Caronte
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51Y

I think it’s because they want to have more control over their hardware than Microsoft lets them.

@Micalet
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5
edit-2
1Y

Security. The only way of working from home with your own machine and SECURITY is liGNUx. Upgrades I switched in XP times because of virus, and did not have even a dual boot until MS WOS 10, and SECURITY improved, but upgrades are annoying, my i3 laptop needed hours one of the times, and its Manjaro can have even a 3 gb (full) update in minutes, I upgraded while working in my desktop with Manjaro, but what if it is your only system and you need to work that day?.

@otso
link
31Y

with most linuxes upgrades can just happen in the background, at a time of your choosing. you could even start them overnight if you wanted

@nutomic
admin
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21Y

If frequent updates are a problem for you, then Manjaro just isnt the right distro. Better pick a more stable distro that updates every half year or so.

@Micalet
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2
edit-2
1Y

I do not care about frequency, I do like to be updated, but Manjaro (and every liGnux distro) lets you work meanwhile, or if you prefer to wait it is MINUTES not HOURS as in MS WOS sometimes.

Sorry if you did not understand what I wrote.

@wraptile
banned
link
31Y

Cryptocurrencies and IT.
I’ve been linux advocate for over a decade now and I don’t think I’ve managed to convinced anyone but people who want to run/work with crypto or people who want to program to switch to Linux based systems.

@biscuitsofdeath
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3
edit-2
1Y

I stopped using windows in early 2000s. Switched to Mac, now I’m using Linux personally and still use Mac for work. But I’ll check it this article to see what people are into.

Edit: looks like windows 10 isn’t a traditional desktop like os and users don’t want to be forced to upgrade their systems to use the newer os.

@Psychemar
link
21Y

What source(s) is this article based on?

@HoolaBoola
link
21Y

As everybody knows already

@Psychemar
link
11Y

Yup… that’s what I feared.

@wiki_me
link
11Y

statcounter has shown no real growth (they are using the stats shown on netmarketshare) , i doubt there is real growth.

@sibachian
link
11Y

Privacy/security awareness and the increasing improvements of software on Linux. There is nothing creepier than microsoft/google/etc collecting detailed data on you and maintaining backdoors on your devices. It makes me feel uncomfortable and paranoid to even think about.

That being said, there are too many limitations in the linux environment for me (and most) to convert. I just tried again recently for 5 months straight but I can’t deal with it. There is no workflow to be made when there aren’t enough software and hardware support to operate efficiently.

I’m not a developer, I’m a marketing coordinator, artist and writer, and the linux ecosystem just doesn’t work for this purpose. None of the applications I need day to day works, and there are either none or weak linux equivalents. Not to mention the many hardware bugs necessary to “just accept” as a linux user (i.e. no fast charging, no gpu switching, no safe software cpu clocking switch, no functional sleep mode, no touch interface, audio issues, etc).

Linux i amazing as an idea, it is true freedom, i desire it greatly, but i have a choice, use linux and starve, or use windows and keep my job.

@jsgohac
link
11Y

How ironic would it be if MS buying github made more people interested in opensource and linux?

Google trends seems to show ubuntu and linux in mild decline, but github had a big spike and then plateau.

@uiizi
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20
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1Y

deleted by creator

Travis Skaalgard
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1
edit-2
1Y

Once SteamPlay/Proton came out, there were exactly 0 reasons to remain on Windows. I assume more people are seeing this.

@lps
link
11Y

I wish this were entirely true, even though the library of playable games is growing there are things such as anti-cheat for AAA games that are unavailable on Linux:(

Travis Skaalgard
link
11Y

It is entirely true. If a game uses those kinds of things, don’t play it on PC.

@developred
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14
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9M

deleted by creator

@ajz
creator
link
21Y

hahaha, nice !

@AgreeableLandscape
mod
admin
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5
edit-2
1Y

deleted by creator

Future Me
link
21Y

Microsoft also gives away a lot of Win10 licences for free. Free upgrade from Win8, access via universities, etc…

@pavot
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6
edit-2
4M

deleted by creator

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Linux is a family of open source Unix-like operating systems based on the Linux kernel, an operating system kernel first released on September 17, 1991 by Linus Torvalds. Linux is typically packaged in a Linux distribution (or distro for short).

Distributions include the Linux kernel and supporting system software and libraries, many of which are provided by the GNU Project. Many Linux distributions use the word “Linux” in their name, but the Free Software Foundation uses the name GNU/Linux to emphasize the importance of GNU software, causing some controversy.

Community icon by Alpár-Etele Méder, licensed under CC BY 3.0

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