trash
15
Ephera
link
141Y

As a person with opinions, I occasionally look at it to remind myself what options there are or to find out about new ones I might want to read up on.

But I would not link it to someone trying to learn about privacy for several reasons:

  1. TMI: Want to switch browsers? Oh yeah, Firefox is good. If you use it, you should also install these extensions and disable WebRTC and apply these about:config changes! Switching browsers alone is already a big step. I can see lots of people just giving up right away when they’re told all these steps. I much prefer the format of https://switching.software/.

  2. “Definitive guide” to privacy: With all the information it tries to give you, it may seem like this is all there is to it. Once you’ve followed all those steps, you’re done. You’re not and you really need to actually understand things, not just follow a few steps, to protect your own privacy.

  3. I don’t always agree: The about:config changes for example seem ridiculous to me. You might break people’s browsers with that for relatively small gains. And that’s not an easy step for non-techies either. Or Signal, I very much distrust the dev behind it. And Keybase has been bought by Zoom recently. Obviously, no single page can ever fit the opinions of every privacy-conscious person, but that’s the point: You should inform yourself and form your own opinions. If you just use what others tell you to, you’ll be using proprietary shovelware again in no time.

@AutumnVoyage
link
4
edit-2
1Y

deleted by creator

Ephera
link
61Y
  1. Use of phone numbers: Yep, not a fan and making it optional wouldn’t hurt that much. I understand that it helps with spam prevention and usability, but the drawbacks for privacy are far too big in my opinion.
  2. Too comfortable with Google: Distribution on Android only through the Google Play Store. Use of Google Cloud Messaging for push notifications, for which they do have a WebSocket fallback now, but that took years of criticism. And Signal Desktop was initially a Chrome App, now it’s Electron. I get that Java is not the hippest technology for building desktop UIs, but they could have even reused code from the Android app.
  3. Promoted WhatsApp et al: Any encryption in WhatsApp is better than no encryption and I have no illusions that WhatsApp’s usage would have decreased without it, so them supplying their encryption module to WhatsApp is cool. But WhatsApp is still a proprietary app. It could just send a decryptable copy of your message to Facebook’s servers. Calling that end-to-end-encrypted is a lie and I would have expected the Signal devs to at least publish a statement that this is a step in the right direction, but far from perfect.
  4. Closed-off ecosystem: They don’t allow forks to connect to their servers and they don’t want to federate with other servers (https://github.com/LibreSignal/LibreSignal/issues/37#issuecomment-217211165). So, while Signal is technically open-source, you cannot self-host the server or fork the client without losing the ability to communicate with most users.

As for Session, it does solve almost all of the problems named above:

  1. Use of phone numbers: Replaced by very easily changeable IDs.
  2. Too comfortable with Google: It is a fork from Signal, so it still uses Electron for the desktop app. I don’t fully understand yet, how they handle notifications, so if Signal’s current use of Google Cloud Messaging is something you disagree with, that’s something worth investigating in Session. But they do offer an APK on their webpage, not just in the Google Play Store, and according to their FAQ are working to get it on F-Droid.
  3. Promoted WhatsApp et al: Different dev, so obviously can’t hold that against them.
  4. Closed-off ecosystem: Their backend is basically already a federated network of servers/nodes and you can just host your own node and join it. As these are therefore operated by many people, they can presumably also not just disallow forks from connecting to the network.
SnowCode
link
21Y

But actually Session is draning all the battery super-fast. I don’t know why it consumed so much in background.

@Mek101
link
1
edit-2
1Y

It’s probably google android seeing it’s not using google services for notifications, and so marking it as a battery drainer. Nearly all FOSS apps that don’t rely on google services for notification tell you that android may mark them for high battery consuption.

SnowCode
link
41Y

The fact is that my battery actually drained super-fast. Until I freeze it. So it really used a lot of battery.

Dessalines
admin
link
71Y

Its good, obvi its impossible to get everyone to agree on what they consider to be the best privacy-related software, but overall they do a good job. The only one I wish they didn’t recommend, is signal (US based, phone number identifiers, not server OSS or self-hostable).

@k_o_t
mod
admin
link
7
edit-2
1Y

it’s meh, in general it’s ok, but there are issues, some of them documented by this post

it’s important to keep in mind that these people aren’t evil (very unlikely at least), they’ve just made some mistakes…

@aeroplain
creator
link
5
edit-2
1Y

deleted by creator

@k_o_t
mod
admin
link
3
edit-2
1Y

Very often the two [privacy respecting and intuitive and easy to use] directly contradict each other, so I guess they had to make a choice between them…

@aeroplain
creator
link
5
edit-2
1Y

deleted by creator

@Zevena
link
51Y

reddit r/privacy loves it

Ephera
link
31Y

Probably because they have a big presence on Reddit at /r/privacytoolsio…

@aeroplain
creator
link
4
edit-2
1Y

deleted by creator

@Panzerfaust
banned
link
41Y

Good. Could be better.

@TheAnonymouseJoker
link
11Y

This is enough to put me off: https://old.reddit.com/r/privacytoolsIO/comments/frz365/privacytools_delists_the_great_cloudwall/fm08anu/?context=10000

I have plenty evidence about the garbage dictator moderators there.

@aeroplain
creator
link
2
edit-2
1Y

deleted by creator

@TheAnonymouseJoker
link
1
edit-2
1Y

When they lock down comments, it does not instill trust in others. If you wanted to embarrass me, you could have also put the full context to destroy my argument.

Surprised how people here let it slide away so happily.

get your facts right before spouting nonsense

What is the nonsense about informing people of legitimate issues about privacy recommendations? And who are these suckers downvoting me? Fans of PTIO?

He came off as extremely rude for what was a simple questioning in the first place. And for questioning, I was downvoted equally as he was upvoted by coincidence, which threw me off, hence my commentary. I thought privacy community advocates freedom of transparency?

@aeroplain
creator
link
2
edit-2
1Y

deleted by creator

@TheAnonymouseJoker
link
1
edit-2
1Y

The problem is, one of their heads drafted this garbage, which should not even be a considered thought in the first place for a privacy page. This page is fully formatted down to spelling errors and presentation, and is ready for deployment.

Why is iPhone, a closed source phone from top to bottom, a consideration for privacy in the first place, that too drafted by one of PTIO’s heads, when there is enough evidence that Apple spies and sells data?

My cross question was surely loaded, now that I think of it, but that feels like ignoring the elephant in the room, something I was trying to point out.

Also look at this: https://old.reddit.com/r/privacy/comments/e9t4ck/a_user_here_threw_ad_hominem_at_a_wikileaks_tweet/fanoabd/

Also, r/privacy (and r/privacytoolsio) moderator trai_dep and r/privacy moderator ourari have a habit of “recommending” iPhones to everyone on privacy communities (see here). Check their comment history. Do you not feel this is ridiculous?

@aeroplain
creator
link
2
edit-2
1Y

deleted by creator

@TheAnonymouseJoker
link
21Y

The problem is that Apple’s promise is hollow, and that their privacy claims are marketing stunts. Even their FBI-sponsored San Ferdandino publicity stunt was fake: https://www.aclu.org/blog/privacy-technology/internet-privacy/one-fbis-major-claims-iphone-case-fraudulent

Apple also complies with 90% of government data requests: https://www.businessinsider.com/apple-complies-percent-us-government-requests-customer-data-2020-1/

There is plenty other evidence I have compiled in a concise manner here.

Competence is fine, and for that I gave them their due in the very locked comment thread I linked (you can read them). And in the meanwhile I have learnt to be more articulate in my approach. That thing angered me so much that I may have let it out a bit (something you can understand). It rarely happened back then, and does not happen now. However, locking every single comment still feels suspicious to me.

A place to discuss privacy and freedom in the digital world.

Privacy has become a very important issue in modern society, with companies and governments constantly abusing their power, more and more people are waking up to the importance of digital privacy.

In this community everyone is welcome to post links and discuss topics related to privacy.

Some Rules

  • Posting a link to a website containing tracking isn’t great, if contents of the website are behind a paywall maybe copy them into the post
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