@Arcadius
link
11M

POP OS and Twister OS

Lessgoo
link
16M

Fedora with gnome 40

@throwaway284921384
link
410M

Debian Stable. Old, but it works and that’s all I want my computer to do

@grtcdr
banned
link
310M

settled on Arch Linux, after distrohopping a thousand times, it’s minimal yet it feels complete…

@mesamunefire
link
310M

Ubuntu for laptop, Manjaro for desktop.

I like Ubuntu’s driver support and I can go anywhere (pre-COVID) without worrying as much if a usb device is going to work.

Manjaro is awesome for steam, itch.io, GOG, etc… Most of our games work in Linux now and its been a seamless experience.

@daojones
link
110M

Crazy, this is exactly what I landed on as well. I install Elementary OS on family computers.

@xe8
link
210M

Started with CentOS, then Ubuntu on servers. I finally started to get comfortable in Linux on desktop with Pop!_OS. Now I’m getting into Arch and exploring i3wm and xmonad.

@Reaton
link
210M

Arch, I like its simplicity (imo if you know a bit about linux there is nothing that hard in Arch)

@throwaway284921384
link
310M

Arch is good for customization. But I value my time more and so rather have something that works to keep it simple and hence use Debian

Mr.Toto
link
110M

I started with Ubuntu, then I tried fedora, and now I’m switch to ElementaryOS because this simplicity, but i really like Debian. In the future y like try Qubes.

@StXh
link
110M

Tinycore linux

@PureTryOut
link
61Y

Alpine Linux. Originally to dogfood myself the packages I maintain for postmarketOS, but I’ve grown quite fond of it and the developer community around it. I run it on my laptop and desktop and servers now, coming from Gentoo.

@plato
link
61Y

ElementaryOS. I don’t use the Pantheon desktop, I just don’t want to distrohop

@yogthos
link
31Y

I found ElementaryOS to work pretty well, and it’s easy enough to install different window managers on it as well. I’ve had it for a couple of years, and it survived multiple upgrades without a hitch. This is the biggest selling point for me, as I’ve had most Linux distros shit the bed on upgrades. At the end of the day I want a distro that just works where I don’t have to keep playing a car mechanic with it.

@Czernobog
link
21Y

I feel ya

@early_adapter
link
51Y

Arch and Guix

@joonazan
link
6
edit-2
1Y

How is Guix? I’ve stopped configuring my Arch after installing Nixos on one machine. Configuration feels much more meaningful in Nix, as you can use it on many machines and it won’t rot.

Nixos isn’t quick to learn, sadly. My main complaint is that there is no popular and good way to structure you configuration that could be given to new users.

I’m kind of concerned about security in Nix. Is Guix even worse because the scripts are Turing-complete?

EDIT: I hate that the nix language is mostly used to glue together shell scripts. Can you avoid shell scripting in Guix?

@early_adapter
link
61Y

I have Guix on one of my laptops. Currently experimenting with it. I’m not yet proficient enough to go all-in but one of these days I will.

Guix is not quick to learn either. I am fully fluent in Scheme but there are so many aspects to Guix that you need to be master before being comfortable with it that it takes time. But I see it as time well invested.

If by ‘shell scripting’ you mean bash, zsh and similar, then yes you can avoid them in Guix. It’s all in Scheme. For me that’s a huge win but YMMV.

I’m not sure I understand your security concern about Turing completeness. Many scripting languages, including bash and zsh, are Turing complete.

@joonazan
link
41Y

There is a security problem if packages can alter other completely unrelated packages. Nix has some of that. The worst case would be that in Guix one package can trivially infect everything in your system.

No shell scripting sounds great! I’m also very interested in GNU Shepherd.

How is running nonfree software? In nix I gave up on running some ML model because Cuda was a pain to get working.

@early_adapter
link
31Y

Guix is fully funcitonal. Each package lists its dependencies and depends only on them. In that way, completely unrelated packages have no effect.

As for nonfree software, the Guix maintainers do not encourage it but there’s a whole channel of nonguix software.

@Atemu
link
21Y

I think the problem is rather that, when building a system derivation, you can override packages (e.g. Firefox) with any Nix derivation (e.g. Google Chrome or other malware) from many places.
All of this is still purely functional and I’m pretty sure Guix has similar functionality.

This isn’t as big of a problem though IMO, your configs should be in VCS which guarantees their correctness and you should only be activating system closures built from trusted sources like Nixpkgs.

@early_adapter
link
11Y

you can override packages (e.g. Firefox) with any Nix derivation (e.g. Google Chrome or other malware)

I see what you did there :winking face:

So yes, the choice is yours to build whatever system derivation you want, even if you shoot yourself in the foot doing so.

@fishinthecalculator
link
31Y

I use Guix as a daily driver on my laptop, coming from Arch and Debian.

What I like the most about Guix is the hackability of it all. In my (about one year long) experience the consistency of iterfacing with a single API and syntax to almost everything in a system is a breath of fresh air after years of copypasting snippets from the web to the most disparate files under /etc.

Of course Scheme has a little steeper learning curve w.r.t. PKGBUILDs but imho it’s much easier than to learn the APT packaging system, that requires you to understand the purpose and syntax of many different DSLs.

@Atemu
link
11Y

My main complaint is that there is no popular and good way to structure you configuration that could be given to new users.

There’s been work on a GUI configuration.nix generator/editor which has the potential to make configuring NixOS more user-friendly than any other Linux distro out there.

@baka
link
51Y

void linux, musl

@deauthorized
link
41Y

linux mint, runs team fortress 2 well enough

@qu4k
link
11Y

… and that’s all you really need :)

@deauthorized
link
21Y

nothing could be more true than this

@Atemu
link
4
edit-2
1Y

NixOS. Once you go declarative, you never want to configure anything imperatively again.

Here’s the configuration common to all my desktop machines if you want to get a taste of what NixOS is like.

@mindtree
link
31Y

I’m with you, running NixOS+GNOME on a Razer Blade Stealth and haven’t been happier! I switched from Arch ~7 months ago - it just feels like a whole other league of portability and reliability.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Linux is a family of open source Unix-like operating systems based on the Linux kernel, an operating system kernel first released on September 17, 1991 by Linus Torvalds. Linux is typically packaged in a Linux distribution (or distro for short).

Distributions include the Linux kernel and supporting system software and libraries, many of which are provided by the GNU Project. Many Linux distributions use the word “Linux” in their name, but the Free Software Foundation uses the name GNU/Linux to emphasize the importance of GNU software, causing some controversy.

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