Lessgoo
link
14M

Fedora with gnome 40

@mesamunefire
link
38M

Ubuntu for laptop, Manjaro for desktop.

I like Ubuntu’s driver support and I can go anywhere (pre-COVID) without worrying as much if a usb device is going to work.

Manjaro is awesome for steam, itch.io, GOG, etc… Most of our games work in Linux now and its been a seamless experience.

@daojones
link
18M

Crazy, this is exactly what I landed on as well. I install Elementary OS on family computers.

@throwaway284921384
link
38M

Debian Stable. Old, but it works and that’s all I want my computer to do

@grtcdr
banned
link
28M

settled on Arch Linux, after distrohopping a thousand times, it’s minimal yet it feels complete…

@Reaton
link
28M

Arch, I like its simplicity (imo if you know a bit about linux there is nothing that hard in Arch)

@throwaway284921384
link
38M

Arch is good for customization. But I value my time more and so rather have something that works to keep it simple and hence use Debian

@xe8
link
18M

Started with CentOS, then Ubuntu on servers. I finally started to get comfortable in Linux on desktop with Pop!_OS. Now I’m getting into Arch and exploring i3wm and xmonad.

Mr.Toto
link
18M

I started with Ubuntu, then I tried fedora, and now I’m switch to ElementaryOS because this simplicity, but i really like Debian. In the future y like try Qubes.

@StXh
link
18M

Tinycore linux

@PureTryOut
link
61Y

Alpine Linux. Originally to dogfood myself the packages I maintain for postmarketOS, but I’ve grown quite fond of it and the developer community around it. I run it on my laptop and desktop and servers now, coming from Gentoo.

@plato
link
61Y

ElementaryOS. I don’t use the Pantheon desktop, I just don’t want to distrohop

@yogthos
link
31Y

I found ElementaryOS to work pretty well, and it’s easy enough to install different window managers on it as well. I’ve had it for a couple of years, and it survived multiple upgrades without a hitch. This is the biggest selling point for me, as I’ve had most Linux distros shit the bed on upgrades. At the end of the day I want a distro that just works where I don’t have to keep playing a car mechanic with it.

@Czernobog
link
21Y

I feel ya

@early_adapter
link
51Y

Arch and Guix

@joonazan
link
6
edit-2
1Y

How is Guix? I’ve stopped configuring my Arch after installing Nixos on one machine. Configuration feels much more meaningful in Nix, as you can use it on many machines and it won’t rot.

Nixos isn’t quick to learn, sadly. My main complaint is that there is no popular and good way to structure you configuration that could be given to new users.

I’m kind of concerned about security in Nix. Is Guix even worse because the scripts are Turing-complete?

EDIT: I hate that the nix language is mostly used to glue together shell scripts. Can you avoid shell scripting in Guix?

@early_adapter
link
61Y

I have Guix on one of my laptops. Currently experimenting with it. I’m not yet proficient enough to go all-in but one of these days I will.

Guix is not quick to learn either. I am fully fluent in Scheme but there are so many aspects to Guix that you need to be master before being comfortable with it that it takes time. But I see it as time well invested.

If by ‘shell scripting’ you mean bash, zsh and similar, then yes you can avoid them in Guix. It’s all in Scheme. For me that’s a huge win but YMMV.

I’m not sure I understand your security concern about Turing completeness. Many scripting languages, including bash and zsh, are Turing complete.

@joonazan
link
41Y

There is a security problem if packages can alter other completely unrelated packages. Nix has some of that. The worst case would be that in Guix one package can trivially infect everything in your system.

No shell scripting sounds great! I’m also very interested in GNU Shepherd.

How is running nonfree software? In nix I gave up on running some ML model because Cuda was a pain to get working.

@early_adapter
link
31Y

Guix is fully funcitonal. Each package lists its dependencies and depends only on them. In that way, completely unrelated packages have no effect.

As for nonfree software, the Guix maintainers do not encourage it but there’s a whole channel of nonguix software.

@Atemu
link
21Y

I think the problem is rather that, when building a system derivation, you can override packages (e.g. Firefox) with any Nix derivation (e.g. Google Chrome or other malware) from many places.
All of this is still purely functional and I’m pretty sure Guix has similar functionality.

This isn’t as big of a problem though IMO, your configs should be in VCS which guarantees their correctness and you should only be activating system closures built from trusted sources like Nixpkgs.

@early_adapter
link
11Y

you can override packages (e.g. Firefox) with any Nix derivation (e.g. Google Chrome or other malware)

I see what you did there :winking face:

So yes, the choice is yours to build whatever system derivation you want, even if you shoot yourself in the foot doing so.

@fishinthecalculator
link
31Y

I use Guix as a daily driver on my laptop, coming from Arch and Debian.

What I like the most about Guix is the hackability of it all. In my (about one year long) experience the consistency of iterfacing with a single API and syntax to almost everything in a system is a breath of fresh air after years of copypasting snippets from the web to the most disparate files under /etc.

Of course Scheme has a little steeper learning curve w.r.t. PKGBUILDs but imho it’s much easier than to learn the APT packaging system, that requires you to understand the purpose and syntax of many different DSLs.

@Atemu
link
11Y

My main complaint is that there is no popular and good way to structure you configuration that could be given to new users.

There’s been work on a GUI configuration.nix generator/editor which has the potential to make configuring NixOS more user-friendly than any other Linux distro out there.

@baka
link
51Y

void linux, musl

@deauthorized
link
41Y

linux mint, runs team fortress 2 well enough

@qu4k
link
11Y

… and that’s all you really need :)

@deauthorized
link
21Y

nothing could be more true than this

@Atemu
link
4
edit-2
1Y

NixOS. Once you go declarative, you never want to configure anything imperatively again.

Here’s the configuration common to all my desktop machines if you want to get a taste of what NixOS is like.

@mindtree
link
31Y

I’m with you, running NixOS+GNOME on a Razer Blade Stealth and haven’t been happier! I switched from Arch ~7 months ago - it just feels like a whole other league of portability and reliability.

Hal
link
41Y

Ubuntu, CentOS (and a little RHEL).

@jlsturbo
link
41Y

arch linux btw

@verdigris
link
41Y

It’s been Arch with Sway for a few months, I’m gearing up to try Gentoo though.

@SirLotsaLocks
link
41Y

Manjaro KDE. I distrohopped for a couple months after I switched to linux in january, from elementary to ubuntu, to ubuntu with kde, to kubuntu, then finally leapt to manjaro and I now have everything I could ever want.

@k3a
link
4
edit-2
1Y

Mostly ArchLinux (KDE work desktop, laptop, HTPC), Alpine ans Debian (Docker containers) but also Gentoo linux (other laptop and server but I don’t recommend it on server :P). The main reason is flexibility. I can choose what software and what dependencies to install or even compile from source. In contrast to most other distros where a small network CLI utility depends on Qt5, CUPS, Cairo and Python.

@fruechtchen
link
41Y
  • laptop: voidlinux, because of libressl and linux, mostely. and because i was curious to try an systemd alternative.
  • server: openbsd. because of security features and libressl.
@jaidedctrl
link
3
edit-2
1Y

haiku (not linux, but c’mon, unix counts) and opensuse on laptop for the past several months— before that, openbsd and parabola for years.

@obifoe
link
31Y

Linux Mint MATE. I’ve been using LM since 2015.

@don
link
31Y

It’s fun to play with all kinds of distros but when I have to set up a box for the mother-in-law xubuntu is my first choice. Xfce is very low on resources and there is a repo for pretty much anything out there.

@stevo
link
31Y

I’m distrohopping on my pinephone between Phosh’s on postmarketOS, Arch and Mobian. Pinebook uses arch. When I get my PC upgraded I will do a complete transition from Manjaro to Arch.

@MegageM
link
31Y

btw

@Qaz
link
31Y

KDE Neon, and Ubuntu Mate on some older hardware

@Micalet
link
31Y

Manjaro and others to test and fail safe.

@Echedenyan
link
31Y

Devuan and Debian.

vendion
link
31Y

Arch Linux at work, and FreeBSD for pretty much everything else.

@konky0418
link
31Y

Currently dual booting gentoo and Opensuse tumbleweed, literally just installed tumbleweed and I’ve had gentoo for a couple of months.

@JohnFKennedy
link
3
edit-2
1Y

Been using Linux Mint for a couple of years now on two different laptops. Friend gave me an old T440P and I put Linux Mint on it, haven’t used anything other than ubuntu, which I disliked for reasons I can’t remember. Loving Mint

@sgtnasty
link
31Y

Manjaro i3 (for my old ThinkPad), CentOS for my file server and Fedora for my ThinkPad Extreme and ThinkCentre.

@rek2
link
21Y

blackarch GNU/Linux with wayland/sway amdgpu. vim. tut, gomuks, etc

@hburb3ri
link
21Y

Arch, but my true love lies with Gentoo. I just became impatient with the compile times.

@roadrunner56
link
21Y

My first distro was vanilla Ubuntu Gnome. I then switched to Manjaro KDE because I wanted to try a rolling release distro with a DE that was lighter and more customizable than Gnome. I really liked KDE, but the rolling release model was just not for me. I then switched over to Kubuntu, which I’m still on.

@EmbarrassedActive4
link
21Y

Manjaro but will likely move to mint, just wanna use something smh

@lecagot
link
21Y

macOS at home, Manjaro at work.

@AndreK4
link
102Y

Manjaro, although thinking about Arch+i3wm when I get a new machine

@ProtoDrew
creator
link
62Y

been using manjaro as well. Loving it

@k_o_t
admin
link
9
edit-2
2Y

Void™

@bnaw
link
62Y

Same here. Void together with sway.

@RoundDuckKira
link
2
edit-2
1Y

deleted by creator

@oriond
link
92Y

Debian

@dreamland
link
8
edit-2
2Y

Arch, effectively (started as Antergos). In the past I’ve used Gentoo.

@Restioson
link
72Y

Pop!_OS

@plato
link
21Y

POP POP

@k_o_t
admin
link
42Y

the worst name of all time :)

@SirLotsaLocks
link
21Y

I wouldn’t say worst but I do get that it isn’t as sleek sounding as arch or void.

Dessalines
admin
link
22Y

Hrm never heard of it, I’ll take a look.

@wesley
link
62Y

Been using Manjaro on my laptop and my desktop for a while now, but I am in a hopping mood so that might change soon.

@Ziln
link
6
edit-2
2Y

openSUSE Tumbleweed returning back to the first distro I ever used way back in 2002 when it was called SuSE Linux its had few name revisions in its time.

@ProtoDrew
creator
link
32Y

wish I could get that working on my machine but it really resisted every step of the way for me

@kuarup
link
62Y

EndeavourOS (pure Arch )

@ajz
link
52Y

Interesting. (And this looks kind of funny : target audience == distro hoppers) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EndeavourOS#Target_audience

@randomrhino
link
62Y

Which isn’t too bad. Many distro hoppers end up using arch. The problem is, that many hoppers try to go more and more minimal without losing too much comfort. Arch is THE way to go. It’s simple to install and use. It is not necessarily bloated with a lot of useless shit. It gives the user the freedom to design the distro just in their favor.

I am not saying, that this isn’t possible with other distros. But in my opinion, Gentoo, Debian, LFS can be used with the same intention, but they end up being way more time consuming to setup. Arch is a nearly perfect trade off between usability & minimal OS. And if you can cope with the rolling release system and systemd, then you’ll be happy with Arch.

After years of struggling with distros I finally found my passion in Arch. I customized my system quite a lot to be kind of a power user. My OS is pretty much perfectly fitted to my needs.

For server-use, I am still a fan of debian. Easy to setup, and no rolling-releases. Software is well tested. Currently, I am checking out Alpine Linux on one of my servers. So far, I am satisfied with it as well, but old habbits die hard. And it’s not that easy to get used to Alpine.

@ajz
link
12Y

+1 I like Arch Linux a lot too (but without Systemd), and I’ve tried Alpine Linux on servers. Has very nice pros but one con was that I couldn’t manage the software and OS upgrades very well. Went back to Debian and Ubuntu where I love the unattended-upgrades package, and the “apt upgrade” “apt dist-upgrade” features.

@randomrhino
link
32Y

Yes, as I said, I am mostly using Debian. It’s an amazing and incredibly stable server system. I mainly digged into Alpine, to try a new system, that wasn’t too popular a couple of years back. I mean, if you go for well known server systems as Debian, Ubuntu, CentOS, then of course, you will be satisfied. But trying things, that weren’t a trend a couple of years back might surprise you with great features, that other distributions doesn’t offer. That’s my hope with Alpine. But sadly, I have too little time to dig into it

@orangelamp
link
52Y

I’m on Stock Debian but seriously considering moving to Ubuntu because it gets more support on stuff like stackexchange

@nyex
link
52Y

i’m a new manjaro user after almost 15 years of using ubuntu. loving the simplicity >.<

Dessalines
admin
link
42Y

Manjaro is great, definitely deserves to be one of the most popular ones.

@alexbuzzbee
link
52Y

In the process of switching from Void Linux (a systemd hipster distro) to Gentoo.

@ajz
link
42Y

In the past I was interested in Void Linux because it uses LibreSSL (OpenSSL is apparently so messy), but I moved on, partially because this distro with their “off-beat” package manager seemed too obscure to me (A not too small community is nice for Q & A) to use it as my daily drive. btw, it does not use Systemd (That was another reason I was interested in it) -> https://voidlinux.org/usage/runit/ And, that reminds me. I still want to play with Bedrock Linux again, which has a fascinating concept : https://bedrocklinux.org

@lemmy
link
42Y

Currently using fedora because it ‘just works’. Manjaro and stuff i’ve always had problems with nvidia drivers and stuff

Tucumano 88
link
42Y

PuppyLinux also AntiX

@muesli
link
42Y

Arch, btw.

(just couldn’t resist)

@nutomic
admin
link
42Y

Manjaro

@ajz
link
42Y

Arch Linux (btw - Without Systemd https://artixlinux.org) and also busy with FreeBSD and OpenBSD. In the past I’ve used Debian, Ubuntu, Slackware.

@AgreeableLandscape
mod
admin
link
42Y

openSUSE Tumbleweed currently. I’ve also used Ubuntu, Debian, and Manjaro.

Dessalines
admin
link
42Y

Arch btw. Have used lubuntu, mint, manjaro, eOS in the past. U?

@ProtoDrew
creator
link
42Y

switching from ElementaryOS to OpenSuse Tumbleweed rn

@Lofenyy
link
32Y

Arch as my current daily driver (laptop) but I’m likely going to switch to Trisquel netinstall soon. I’ve already migrated my desktop to Trisquel Mini.

@AndreVallestero
link
32Y

Alpine on my main laptop, Manjaro ARM on my Pinebook Pro, Arch on my desktop.

@nollo
link
32Y

Debian on my work desktop, Ubuntu on my home desktop, and Manjaro on my laptop.

Been trying to get Debian on my work laptop too but it’s a cheapo 32-bit notebook designed to only run Windows 10, and it’s been resisting the installation every step of the way. Soon it will learn that the Debian text installer wins (almost) every time!

@u03c6
link
32Y

Arch Linux on my main machine, Ubuntu on work notebook

@Cfheofzf
link
32Y

Manjaro - xfce and xubuntu on a couple of laptops, and thinking about using Pop! on my desktop

@Tommstein
link
22Y

Arch. Current install is nine years old.

@lxs
link
02Y

Windows 10 at home and Windows XP at work.

@Atemu
link
11Y

I’m not sure which is worse

@EldritchBoat
link
6
edit-2
1Y

deleted by creator

@lemmywinks
link
1
edit-2
1Y

deleted by creator

@soda
link
3
edit-2
1Y

deleted by creator

@developred
link
3
edit-2
8M

deleted by creator

@kylejj
link
3
edit-2
6M

deleted by creator

@fturco
link
11
edit-2
8M

deleted by creator

@artifuchs
link
1
edit-2
1Y

deleted by creator

@lainon
link
1
edit-2
7M

deleted by creator

@LucasDondo
link
6
edit-2
1Y

deleted by creator

@wesley
link
12Y

So what you are saying is you used to use arch btw?

@k_o_t
admin
link
52Y

It seems I cannot escape the btw arch meme here, so I will pour all my effort into fighting it. Here’s your downvote, good sir!

@wesley
link
32Y

Aww I apologize. Wasn’t trying to annoy anybody. Sorry. :(

@LucasDondo
link
3
edit-2
1Y

deleted by creator

@smudge
link
3
edit-2
4M

deleted by creator

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Linux is a family of open source Unix-like operating systems based on the Linux kernel, an operating system kernel first released on September 17, 1991 by Linus Torvalds. Linux is typically packaged in a Linux distribution (or distro for short).

Distributions include the Linux kernel and supporting system software and libraries, many of which are provided by the GNU Project. Many Linux distributions use the word “Linux” in their name, but the Free Software Foundation uses the name GNU/Linux to emphasize the importance of GNU software, causing some controversy.

Community icon by Alpár-Etele Méder, licensed under CC BY 3.0

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